American lager temperatures

Have a question or want to show off your project? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View


Since A-B is declaring Budweiser to be the "Great American Lager", when
will they serve it at proper lager temperatures?

Re: American lager temperatures


Quoted text here. Click to load it

I didn't realize  Anheuser Busch was in the business of serving beer,
no matter the temperature.  Where are the Anheuser-Busch owned pubs
located.


Re: American lager temperatures


John S. wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

A-B has a vested interest in making sure that its products are delivered
and served in as optimal a manner as is possible to ensure, and that
includes quality control by its reps and distributors at the point of
sale.

Re: American lager temperatures


On Jun 23, 1:29pm, yedyegiss <dee/gee/ess/0ne/3hree/zer0/zer0_@_gee/
maaiil.c0m> wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Uuuuhhh...yup...I agree.  And really the optimal temperature is really
not a hard and fast rule - pretty much what the final beer drinker
wants and can attain.

Re: American lager temperatures


1ba77580d7c4@x35g2000hsb.googlegroups.com:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I'm guessing you've never been to the Saint Louis airport.  There were A-B
bars in Chicago as well.

Re: American lager temperatures



Quoted text here. Click to load it

You sure about that? Breweries are not allowed to sell at retail in
most cases, and must sell through a distributor who sells to
retailers. There might be an occasional exception in one state or
another, but as far as I recall all 50 states have a three-tier
distribution system for alcoholic beverages. The exceptions that are
generally allowed are brewpubs. Breweries can usually offer tastes of
their beer as part of a tour, but they're not allowed to sell the beer
itself directly to customers.

-Steve

Re: American lager temperatures


stvjackson@gmail.com wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Although both Oregon and Washington states have three-tier systems,
small breweries in both states are also allowed to sell their products
on a retail B2C basis, and are allowed to self-distribute as well,
bypassing the middle distribution layer of the three tiers.  This is not
limited to brewpubs.  I know of several breweries where I can take my
own corny keg, party pig, growler, or similar container to be filled
and sold to me directly; these are production operations, not brewpubs.
Some of these operations will also sell me bottled beer to go, as well.

In the main, you're probably right, though.  I've seen A-B branded bars
in some U.S. airports, and suspect that it's some kind of brand
licensing deal between an independent operator and A-B, so that A-B gets
around no-direct-ownership laws.  But in Portland, OR's airport, local
brewpubs have their own outlets and are allowed to sell product there,
making it possibly the most craft-brew friendly airport in the country.

Re: American lager temperatures



Quoted text here. Click to load it


Well, now I have a reason to visit Portland....or at least the airport.

Re: American lager temperatures


Bryon Lape wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

If you like good beer at all, Portland ranks pretty high on the A-list
of beer-friendly cities in the USA.  Lots of of breweries and brewpubs,
and some great pub and restaurant venues as well, including a fine-
dining place, Higgins, that has as good a beer list as its wine list.

Combine it with a visit to Seattle and places in between (Vancouver
WA has some breweries and a killer bottle shop right next door to the
Salmon Creek Brewing Co brewpub, Olympia has a couple, Tacoma has
Harmon Brewing and Engine House #9 Pizza Co brewpubs, and there's
more, and ... it can all be done with the train!), and you've got one
of the best beer-touring trips in the USA.

Re: American lager temperatures



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Is there a more beer-friendly beer city in the US than Portland?  I think
not.






Re: American lager temperatures


Blake S wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

It's up there, but I don't have a problem with Seattle either.  Last
night was a good case in point:  Harviestoun's Ola Dubh, Flyer's Sick
Duck '07 and '08, Deschutes Abyss '08, Cantillon 50N 4E, Baird Brewing's
Yuzu ale, Reunion Red Rye, Reunion Imperial Brown, and Sierra Nevada
Monorail, as well as a taste of the missus's Kasteel Rouge (mmm,
Luuuuuden's).  Not at all a bad evening out.

But Portland continues to shine:  Hopworks Urban Brewery, Bailey's
Tap Room, and on it goes.  Every time I go to PDX, a new surprise
awaits.  Now I see there's a nostalgia-tinged event coming up:  the
Produce Row Cafe's 30th anniversary bash.  Should I go there and
point out that the place has been around longer than that?  Nah.  I
should go there and enjoy the festivities, and see if the old
Canadian and German beer bottles and cans that I put in the display
cabinet are still there.  They were last time I looked, a couple of
years ago.  I put them in the cabinet in 1977.

Re: American lager temperatures


Quoted text here. Click to load it

The point being you asked when A-B was going to serve their beer at
the "proper temperature".  That of course is an imposible task for any
brewer.  Indeed the "proper temperature" is determined most drinking
situations by personal choice.

Re: American lager temperatures


Quoted text here. Click to load it

   That statement is way too Beer Barney for my tastes.

   Believe it or don't, but many food items are made with a
particular serving temperature or temperature range in mind.
Try eating cold lamb stew complete with congealed fat sometime.
You'll get the point.  Similarly, if you take a tour of a
Bud factory you'll get the opportunity to try some of the
beers they brew. They most assuredly will serve it to you
at the temperature they feel is most appropriate. If you
then told them they were serving their beer at the "wrong"
temperature I suspect they would not react well.
--

Joel Plutchak                "Beer doesn't stain, if it's a light pilsner."
$LASTNAME at VERYWARMmail.com      - Sheldon Miller

Re: American lager temperatures


Joel wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

That depends.  If they responded as if they were admonishing a
particularly errant and misbehaving child, I'd consider that "well."
Mildly derisive laughter tainted with sarcasm would also work.

Re: American lager temperatures


On Jun 27, 9:55am, plutc...@see.headers (Joel) wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Carrying an argument to the extreme is certainly one way of stopping
discussion isn't it.

Re: American lager temperatures



Quoted text here. Click to load it

So, I take it that you don't recognize "whatever temperature the
drinker wants" is an extreme on one end of the scale in this
discussion?

-Steve

Re: American lager temperatures


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Actually no.  Extreme would be beer served hot, i.e. 150 degrees or 0
degrees.

Re: American lager temperatures



Quoted text here. Click to load it

I am certain there are taverns across the country who only
sell A-B products.  As such they get significant support
from A-B via their distributor.  I knew a tavern owner who
had A-B in his bar, but sold whatever thru his package
goods store that was part of the tavern.  He told me
he got most of his equipment either free or heavily
dicounted via his distributor.  For the record, I see
nothing improper in that.

Dick

Re: American lager temperatures


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Are those Anheuser Busch owned pubs?  Or simply privately owned pubs
that serve A-B products.

Re: American lager temperatures



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Well, I cannot say for sure who owns them, but they only serve A-B
products.  This is a similar model that Adolfus followed in the early days
when he paid tavern owners to only carry his product.

Site Timeline