My fellow Americans

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From www.saveab.com
My fellow Americans,

Like baseball, apple pie and ice cold beer (wrapped in a red, white
and blue label), Anheuser-Busch is an American original. Founded in
St. Louis, Missouri, AB represents the spirit of our country, giving
millions of Americans the "pursuit of happiness" through its high
quality products and thousands of great paying jobs. Generations of
Americans have grown up loving AB products and have appreciated its
committment to our communities.

Now, our city, our state, our nation and our workers are being
threatened with the loss of A-B to foreign investors.

With your help we can fight the foreign invasion of A-B. We will fight
to protect this American treasure. We will take to the Internet, to
the streets, to the marble halls of our capitals, whatever it takes to
stop the invasion.

Join us and join the fight! Sign the on-line petition today.

Make your voice heard.


Because "This Bud's for you and the U.S.A.!"

Yours in arms,

Re: My fellow Americans


On Mon, 16 Jun 2008 07:30:20 -0700 (PDT), Mister2u

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Budweiser is piss and uses bully tactics to run the little breweries
out of business.


Phil

Re: My fellow Americans


On Mon, 16 Jun 2008 18:47:22 -0400, Phil wrote:
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Bud is piss maybe, but that is just an opinion. And even if it is piss
it's 5.4%ABV piss. As to your other claim: can you cite any examples?
I've never heard of AB ever doing anything WalMart-y to the competition.
The sell cheap and advertise a LOT, but that's just business. How have
they stong-armed or bullied any micros out of business?

  Tom

--
TARogue (t a r o g u e (at) y a h o o . c o m)
   "So I hated life, because what is done under the sun was grievous
    to me; for all is vanity and a chasing after wind." Ecclesiastes 2:17

Re: My fellow Americans


On Mon, 16 Jun 2008 23:15:52 +0000 (UTC), look@my.sig (TARogue) wrote:

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There's Budejovickż Budvar.  AB sued Budvar for using 'their' name,
despite the fact that Budvar had been using it long before AB was
around.

AB sued Pete's Wicked Ale for copyright infringement when they
introduced Spuds MacKenzie.  PWA apparently had a pit bull on it's six
pack holder and AB took them to court over it.  This is despite the
fact that PWA had a pit on its six packs years before Spuds was
'born.'

There was a brewery (I can't remember its name) that came out with
Billy Budd Ale (after the Herman Melville character).  AB, once again,
sued for copyright infringement, saying that people would confuse the
two names.  BIlly Budd Ale disappeared.

AB sued A&B Distributors (a beer distributor) to change its name
because it was too much like AB.  THis lawsuit happened after AB
terminated its business relationship with A&B (which distributed
Budweiser for 35 years).  A&B Distributos ending up leaving the beer
business.

And then there's AB's tactics of 'convincing' distributors to carry
only their own beer.  But that's a story for another day....


Phil

Re: My fellow Americans


Phil wrote:

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No, Phil, they hadn't.

Budejovickż Budvar, founded 1895.

Anheuser-Busch, founded 1852 and incorporated 1875. They first brewed a
beer called "Budweiser" in 1876. An entirely different brewery sold a
beer called Budweiser BŁrgerbraŁ in the States a few years before A-B's
Budweiser. But that brewery had no connection to Budvar, and it was
already becoming a generic name much like Pilsner.

Nor did A-B sue Budvar. They companies reached an agreement in 1911
establishing territories for use of the name.

There have been trademark defense lawsuits in various markets since
then, initiated by *both* breweries.

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If Pete's never bothered to trademark their logo, the rules of trademark
law are such that A-B would be in the right to pursue defense of their
mark. A later competitor is not responsible for a predecessor's failure
to register their mark, and failure to either file a mark or defend it
can cause courts to determine that the claim to the mark had expired for
the original company.

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Entirely reasonable conclusion, and nearly an open-and-shut case in
trademark law. Had someone come up with Billy Budd Drain Cleaner and A-B
sued, they'd have lost and had no grounds. But having a phonetically
similar name selling the same product is going to result in losing a
trademark case nearly every time.

I'm not by any means asserting A-B are all sweetness and light. But if
you're going to present a company as evil, it'd be good to have accurate
facts, as well as understand how trademarks actually work.

-Steve

Re: My fellow Americans


On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 03:30:05 GMT, Steve Jackson


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Pete's did trademark the logo.  Apparently Budweiser's lawyers never
bothered to look into that.  They figured they would just drive the
little guy bankrupt with legal fees.

The capper to this story, however, is after the court sided with
Pete's, Budweiser sent them a letter givibng them permission to use
the logo.


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Does this mean that Budweiser has the rights to the character?

No one would confuse the two beers....except maybe those who believe
Budweiser's advertising; they have no taste.


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My argument was off the top of my head.  I wasn't going to research
this.


Phil


Re: My fellow Americans


Phil wrote:

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Nope. But they do have a right (and, in the way trademark law works,
obligation) to defend their mark against anything that's similar.

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You'd be surprised at how many would confuse it. I see it in consumer
research all the time.

The other thing with trademark law is, a failure not to defend your mark
can cause you to end up losing it. Let's say A-B didn't defend their
mark against Billy Budd. Sometime in the future, a court could decide
that another similarly named beer was legit because A-B didn't care
enough to defend their mark in a similar situation. It would hardly be
unprecedented in the history of trademark law.

-Steve

Re: My fellow Americans


On Wed, 18 Jun 2008 01:07:06 GMT, Steve Jackson


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A&B distributed Budweiser for 35 years before Budweiser pulled the
carpet out from underneath them.

It's not necessarily a case of just going to court anymore.  The big
guy has the resources to run the little guy bankrupt through bullshit
legal procedings.  Right or wrong has nothing to do with it.


Phil

Re: My fellow Americans


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25 years ago when I drank lagers, I won a beer
tasting competition correctly identifying 13
out 15 beers.  My only fault was failing to
distinguish between Coors and Millers.

While I haven't had an industrial light lager
in the last 10 years, I believe I could still
distinguish Bud from Coors and Millers.  Bud
tastes like water that was used to cook corn
while Coors and Millers have no taste at all.

Dick

Re: My fellow Americans


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It looks like everyone should read this, it's a good perspective from
both companies, Czech Budvar and AB

http://www.american.edu/TED/budweis.htm
at least we can stop arguing who knows more about what, when this says
it all..

Cheers...

Re: My fellow Americans


On 7/12/2008 8:23 PM cmlemay@gmail.com ignored two million years of=20
human evolution to write:

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It's poorly written, sloppy, and plays fast and loose with facts.
Here's an example.

"The (then Czechoslovak) company named Budejovicky Budvar was founded in
the town of Ceske Budejovice in 1895. The beer, however has been brewed
in Budejovice ever since the 14th century."

This is unmitigated bullshit.  The style of beer brewed by Budejovicky
Budvar, a pale lager, was developed in the 1840s.  While C. Budejovice
has been a brewing town since the 14th century, Budvar-Budweiser most
certainly hasn't been brewing since then.  Muddying the waters like this
is pointless.  Also, there was no such thing as a "then Czechoslovak"
company or anything else in 1895, as those lands were part of the
Austro-Hungarian empire.  Czechoslovakia didn't exist until after
World War I.

There's another brewery in town, Budejovicky mestansky pivovar a.s.,
that *also* markets a beer called "Budweiser B=FCrgerbr=E4u," too, and th=
is
isn't even mentioned, mostly because the brewer hasn't pressed the issue
so much with A-B, and sells its beer under names like "Crystal" and
"Samson" in the USA.

Re: My fellow Americans



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It must be nice to live with your head in the sand.  Take a look at what
they did to Redhook.  They are the Microsoft of the beer world.  It is
about time they have done to them what they have done to so many other
breweries.

Re: My fellow Americans


No Poster wrote:

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Do tell.  What *did* they do to Redhook?

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They've created a near-monopoly on beer?  They own some crazy 80% share
of the market?  They have crazy-high profit margins?  Really?

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What have they done to other breweries that should be done to them?

Re: My fellow Americans


On Tue, 17 Jun 2008 09:40:28 -0700, yedyegiss


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AB has bought out smaller breweries, only to shut them down.  While I
don't see this happening, it would be poetic justice.


Phil

Re: My fellow Americans


Phil wrote:
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Cite?  When's the last time A-B did that?  They've bought into several
craft breweries, but all are still up and running (and doing relatively
well, thanks, in part, to being part of A-B superior distribution
chain).  They did buy the *brand names* "Rolling Rock" and "Latrobe
Brewing Co." in '06, and the owner of the brewery, InBev, sold the plant
in a separate deal, to City Brewing.  The brewery is up and brewing,
among others things, some Samuel Adams beers.

Perhaps you're talking about A-B purchase of the American Brewing
Company in Miami, FL- in 1958?  They ran the brewery for several years,
but anti-trust regulators made them get rid of it.  It was bought by the
National Brewing Co. and closed in 1975.

All the big breweries that specialized in "gobbling up" the small
breweries are gone. Falstaff, Heileman, Stroh, Pabst (survives in name
only- no breweries), Carling, National, Associated. Mostly because they
wound up with a lot of pre-Prohibition era, inefficient, high labor
cost, inner city breweries trying to compete with A-B's modern,
automated "beer factories".   In some respects, the government's trying
to regulate A-B's growth was the best thing that ever happened to them,
in that they built new, rather than purchase old, breweries.

Re: My fellow Americans


No Poster wrote:

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They gave wider distribution to an already-mediocre beer? Wow. Pure evil.

-Steve

Re: My fellow Americans



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Is this a bait for you know who?





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Re: My fellow Americans


wrote:


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I can't think who you know who is at the moment, but no.


Phil

Re: My fellow Americans


No tot mention Budweiser sounds so very unamerican as... well I think yanks just
wish they were European.



Phil wrote:
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Re: My fellow Americans


Mister2u wrote:

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Baseball: based on the English games of rounders and cricket, and
references to "baseball" in British literature before American
independence.

Apple pie: recipes for apple pie exist in British literature since at
least the time of Chaucer, and the Dutch have published recipes going
back to at least the 17th century.

A-B: started by German immigrants, using brewing processes and styles
they'd learned in the home country, whose flagship product is named
after a famous Czech brewing town.

So, yes, Anheuser-Busch is as much an American "original" as baseball
and apple pie. That is to say, not at all.

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The American spirit of claiming American origin to stuff invented
elsewhere? Yeah, they represent that.

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You need to sound less like a press release.

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Were you concerned about the foreign invasion of Modelo when A-B bought
up half the Mexican brewer? Were you concerned about the foreign
invasion when A-B bought up more than a quarter of Chinese brewer Tsingato?

Oh, yes, it's ok when Americans do it, but it's not ok when Americans
have it done to them. Again, you're right: A-B is very much
representative of the American spirit.

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No.


I am. I couldn't care less who owns A-B. Nor do I find international
commerce a grave threat to the country, whether beer or most anything else.

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You can have mine. Can't stand the stuff.

-Steve

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