Re: Bud commitment commercial

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   It's been awhile, but some years ago I read a well-researched
article about American Light Lager.  One thing I remember to this
day is the assertion that most of the big and regional brewers,
including Anheuser-Busch, slowly and significantly cut hop bittering
rates at least from the early 1960's to the (then) present day.  I
don't recall the specifics, but it was on the order of 20 IBUs
(International Bittering Units) then to the 10 to 12 range now.
For reference, the average human perception threshold for detecting
bitterness is about 10 IBUs.
   But you may dismiss that as mere hearsay. Here's something you
might find more convincing:

   The roster of America's most infamous falsehoods grew longer
   this week, thanks to the St. Louis-based maker of Budweiser
   and Bud Light.  ...in 2005, Anheuser-Busch's head brewmaster,
   Douglas Muhleman, stated, "The recipes for Budweiser and Bud
   Light have not changed."

   But in a front-page story in yesterday's [April 26, 2006] Wall
   Street Journal, Anheuser-Busch chairman August Busch III and
   Muhleman admitted to having made several changes over the last
   20-plus years to their flagship Budweiser and Bud Light brands,
   after vehemently denying it for months.

   In written statements to the media last November, Muhleman repeatedly
   claimed that Anheuser-Busch had not changed the recipe for its beers.
   In a Nov. 11, 2005, statement, he said, "To suggest that we have made
   a formulation change in the way we brew our beers is a marketing ploy
   and is simply false. The recipes for Budweiser and Bud Light have not
   changed." Three days later, he reiterated the point: "It's a winning
   formula and we haven't changed it."

   The Wall Street Journal story delved into the adjustments the country's
   largest brewer has made over the years to enable its products to appeal
   to the varying palates of a mass audience. But as consumers have become
   more willing to make active brand choices to meet their individual tastes,
   Anheuser-Busch has found itself vulnerable to smaller and more distinctive
   brands. The publication's focus on the challenge facing Budweiser and Bud
   Light resulted in a stark about-face from Anheuser-Busch.

   Moreover, for all its devotion to consistency, Anheuser concedes Budweiser
   has changed over the years. It quietly tinkered with its formula to make
   the beer less bitter and pungent, say several former brewmasters...," the
   Journal reported yesterday.

   Later, the article reports: "Mr. Muhleman... says the company didn't set
   out to make the beers less bitter. He calls the change 'creep,' the result
   of endlessly modifying the beer... this is a change over 20, 30, 40 years,'
   says Mr. Muhleman... 'Over time, there is a drift.' "
--

Joel Plutchak                "Beer doesn't stain, if it's a light pilsner."
$LASTNAME at VERYWARMmail.com      - Sheldon Miller

Re: Bud commitment commercial



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Their first change from the lager recipe Aldolfus brought back from Germany
was to add rice (later it was claimed this added to "drinkability").  
America 6 row barley does not produce enough starch to convert to sugar as
compared to British 2 row.  The second was a substitution of hops
varieties.  Next came pasteurization.  After prohibition, it was deemed a
bit to strong a drink and the alcohol content was cut to help increase
audience acceptance.  After WWII it was cut again as returning GIs were
used to drinking the watered down crap the Army provided.  In the 70's, it
was cut again, but this time they called it a light beer.  This was made to
appeal more to women.  It is also no longer aged in wood barrels, so forget
the "Beechwood aging" as that is a myth.

Today their recipe consists of American 6 row, rice, water, yeast and an
assortment of hops.  The goal is no discernable hop taste or smell, no malt
taste and no adjunct flavor, and a consistency on each batch, bordering on
dullness.  It is a beer only for the reason that it is made from cereal
grains (wine being made from fruit).

To be fair, both Miller and Coors changed their recipes for many of the
same reasons, with the exception of rice malt.

Re: Bud commitment commercial


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C'mon...that's no recipe.  Unless you can back up your claim to
knowlege about the contents of their original recipe and all of the
changes and the latest one, don't bother. Good grief.

Re: Bud commitment commercial


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   You do the same, to prove your point.  Quotes from news
articles and from Anheuser-Busch brewers themselves have
been provided as counter evidence.  You have only your own
assertion.
   Or just keep on with your conspiracy theories.  Your
choice.  It's as simple as that.
--

Joel Plutchak                "Beer doesn't stain, if it's a light pilsner."
$LASTNAME at VERYWARMmail.com      - Sheldon Miller

Re: Bud commitment commercial


No Poster wrote:

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Um, no, it isn't.  The beechwood aging process has nothing to do with
barrels.  It has to do with adding beechwood staves to the beer to
assist in clarification, by creating attraction sites for flocculating
yeast and other particles.  A-B doesn't claim that their beer is aged
in beechwood barrels.

The facts will set you free:
http://www.allaboutbeer.com/columns/abletter.html
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That's the reason that ANY beverage is considered a beer, sport.  Since
Bud has malted barley, water, yeast, and hops, along with the rice
adjunct, yep, it's a beer.

You're not going to claim that the only good beers are adjunct-free,
are you?  Or that only good beers have discernible hop bitterness?

Re: Bud commitment commercial


No Poster wrote:

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A-B have never in my lifetime claimed to age in wood barrels. And
Beechwood aging is not a myth. Beechwood is still added during the
lagering process. Its use, if I remember correctly, is more as a yeast
flocculator than a flavor component.

Do they leave the impression in their advertising? Of course.
Advertising is an exercise in putting the best possible spin on reality.
  It's really not much different than Stone pretending that drinking
their beer makes you something special.

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Nearly all brewers adjust their recipes. Look for more of it with the
current hop shortage. It's not just a big brewer thing. Nor is it
inherently a bad thing.

Re: Bud commitment commercial


plutchak@see.headers (Joel) wrote in

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And that's only to what they will admit.  They have changed it several
times.  It is one thing if the recipe stayed the same, but the ingredients
themselves modified (soil differences, climate, genetic mutation, etc).  
But the recipe has changed.  Get a bottle of Budvar and taste from where
Bud came.  They are not even close.


Re: Bud commitment commercial


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Budvar is a different recipe.  I suspect it may have
been the result of trying to sell Bud under the German
'purity laws' which had nothing to do with purity.

In most of sub-Saharan Africa, beer must be made with
grain Sorghum rather than malt.  So everything brewed
there tastes different than it would on tap here.

Dick


Re: Bud commitment commercial


No Poster wrote:

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A-B's Budweiser was originally brewed BEFORE Budevoicky Pivovar started
brewing.  It's kinda hard to base your product on one that came a few
years later, isn't it?  A-B based the "Budweiser" name on the town's
brewing tradition, not on any particular beer, and back when it was
first introduced, it wasn't the only "Budweiser" brand produced in the
USA.

Re: Bud commitment commercial


No Poster wrote:

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Of course they're not. They've never been the same beer. Nor did A-B's
Budweiser come from Budvar's Budweiser. They're two entirely different
beers, just as Michelob and Anchor Steam are two entirely different beers.

And, as pointed out elsehwere in the thread, A-B brewed a beer called
"Budweiser" years before Budvar was produced.

-Steve


Re: Bud commitment commercial



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Which dates are being used here?  1265, 1532 or 1895?

Re: Bud commitment commercial


No Poster wrote:


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1895. The company that brews Budvar was founded in that year. Earlier
years are irrelevant as 1) light lagers did not exist in either year and
2) "Budweiser" is simply the German word for denoting "from Budweis".
It's the same as calling something "Londoner".

A-B started selling a beer called Budweiser in 1876. If Wikipedia is
right, they registered the trademark two years later. A different
Budejovice brewery sold a Budweiser beer in the States a bit before A-B,
but that's not the same company as Budejovicky Budvar.

Really, the only (and better) case to be made is that "Budweiser" is a
generic description just like "Pilsner", and that A-B's product is a
poor example of the style, much as Miller Lite's a poor example of a
pilsner.

Re: Bud commitment commercial


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   Actually, there is a place and history behind American Light
Lager, and anybody who wants to really learn about beer can
find something positive in it.
   For example, I've toured the main Bud plant several times
now, both public tours and one private tour given by one of
their brewmasters where we saw their really sweet research
pilot plant (they have *two* pilot plants). After the public
tour, you end up in their tasting room and can taste several
of their beers and other beverages. One very illuminating
thing to do is to taste Budweiser and Michelob side by side.
Bud is made with rice and a higher percentage of 6-row barley,
while Michelob is made with no rice and more 2-row barley.
The difference in character of the grain flavor in those two
beers, consumed as fresh as they can be right at the breewry,
is very educational, and can give you a real appreciation for
the ingredients that go into beer in general.

(But since all I do is bash big brewers, don't believe a
word of the above. ;-)
--

Joel Plutchak                "Beer doesn't stain, if it's a light pilsner."
$LASTNAME at VERYWARMmail.com      - Sheldon Miller

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