Researcher under fire for allegedly faking red wine studies

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•By: Suzanne Murray


 
Some of the good news about the benefits of red wine could have been
fake news.

A University is accusing one of its researchers of publishing fake
studies that touted the benefits of red wine.

Dipak Das, a professor in the department of surgery and director of
the Cardiovascular Research Center at the University of Connecticut
Health Center, "is guilty of 145 counts of fabrication and
falsification of data," in as many as 11 scientific journals. This is
according to a university statement.

This comes after a three-year investigation into Das's work after an
anonymous tip alleging irregularities in his research.

The university sent letters to the 11 journals that published Das's
work and has declined $890,000 in federal grants awarded to him.

Das has published work on the benefit of resveratrol in red wine as
well as crushed garlic for the heart.  He is being dismissed from the
university.  His lawyer said allegations against him could be "easily
refuted" and said "charges against him involve prejudice within the
university against Indian researchers," said a statement quoted by the
website Retraction Watch.


Read more:
http://www.wcpo.com/dpp/news/local_news/researcher-under-fire-for-allegedly-faking-red-wine-studies#ixzz1jHuASe6T

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Re: Researcher under fire for allegedly faking red wine studies
•By: Suzanne Murray


 
Some of the good news about the benefits of red wine could have been
fake news.

A University is accusing one of its researchers of publishing fake
studies that touted the benefits of red wine.

Dipak Das, a professor in the department of surgery and director of
the Cardiovascular Research Center at the University of Connecticut
Health Center, "is guilty of 145 counts of fabrication and
falsification of data," in as many as 11 scientific journals. This is
according to a university statement.

This comes after a three-year investigation into Das's work after an
anonymous tip alleging irregularities in his research.

The university sent letters to the 11 journals that published Das's
work and has declined $890,000 in federal grants awarded to him.

Das has published work on the benefit of resveratrol in red wine as
well as crushed garlic for the heart.  He is being dismissed from the
university.  His lawyer said allegations against him could be "easily
refuted" and said "charges against him involve prejudice within the
university against Indian researchers," said a statement quoted by the
website Retraction Watch.


Read more:
http://www.wcpo.com/dpp/news/local_news/researcher-under-fire-for-allegedly-faking-red-wine-studies#ixzz1jHuASe6T
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