Aerating vs. oxidizing wort?

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Hi everyone,

In a number of books on homebrewing there are many cautions about not =
letting the wort "splash or foam" during transfer from your brewing =
vessel into a bottling vessel because of "oxidation".=20

On the other hand, I've also seen gadgets specifically for the purpose =
of pumping pure oxygen into your wort to aerate it as it's fermenting.

1.  Is wort aeration a good idea?:
2.  if so, is it such a good idea that you should do it with every batch =
or is it only important for certain types of brew?

Again, there's a good wort aerator design outlined in Brew Ware by =
Lutzen =
(http://half.ebay.com/cat/buy/prod.cgi?cpid=3D1197683&meta_id=3D1) by =
I'm wondering if someone has  a different opinion on a) to use or not =
use and b) a better design.

Glen
Maryville, TN

Re: Aerating vs. oxidizing wort?
O.K. here it is.  You want to get a LOT of oxygen into your wort
before you pitch your yeast.  This is so that the yeast can use it to
multiply.  As soon as the O2(oxygen) is gone from the wort the yeast
starts to eat sugar, and change it into Acl. and CO2.  You MUST get a
lot of O2 into your wort or the ferment will not as good.

Now if you get O2 into your fermented beer, it will cause a bad taste.
So do not splash the beer when you rack from primary to secondary or
botteling bucket.  Also do not splash it when you bottle it.

Glenn

On Sun, 6 Jul 2003 11:44:10 -0400, "Glen Leslie"

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the wort "splash or foam" during transfer from your brewing vessel into a
bottling vessel because of "oxidation".
Quoted text here. Click to load it
(http://half.ebay.com/cat/buy/prod.cgi?cpid=1197683&meta_id=1) by I'm wondering
if someone has  a different opinion on a) to use or not use and b) a better
design.
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Re: Aerating vs. oxidizing wort?
Quoted text here. Click to load it
letting the wort "splash or foam" during transfer from your brewing vessel
into a bottling vessel because of "oxidation".
Quoted text here. Click to load it
pumping pure oxygen into your wort to aerate it as it's fermenting.
Quoted text here. Click to load it
or is it only important for certain types of brew?
Quoted text here. Click to load it
(http://half.ebay.com/cat/buy/prod.cgi?cpid=1197683&meta_id=1) by I'm
wondering if someone has  a different opinion on a) to use or not use and b)
a better design.
Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: Aerating vs. oxidizing wort?
sorry-- # 22
"alebert" <noemail.com> wrote in message
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of
batch
Lutzen
b)
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Underperforming wort
I just did two all grain batches.

#1's  og was 1.062
It consisted of 13lb English 2 row Malt, infusion mashed @ 158 for 60min.

#2's og was a dissapointing 1.04
It consisted of 13lb American 2 row Malt, infusion mashed @154 for 60 min.

I was expecting #2's to be > 1.07.
Was it the grind, the malt, or the process?

Thanks

Dale


Re: Underperforming wort
Thank you Thomas,

Source of water = tap
Water treatment = none (both cases)
Volume result = 5.5gallon
Mash thickness = 1.5qt per Lb of grain on 1st(158deg),  1.3qt per Lb of grain on
2nd.(154deg)
American 2-row ...... I'll remember tomorrow.

The crush was done on two different machines.
...........
So having the Beer Store Vendor crush the grain is sort of like an uncontrolled
crap shoot.

Thanks again.
Dale


"Thomas T. Veldhouse" wrote:

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Re: Underperforming wort

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uncontrolled

Yes indeed!  Many do not know squat about crushing malt.  If somebody
changed the setting on their mill, they may not even notice.  It really
depends who you buy from.  I have seen the mill at Northern Brewer and it
looks like you will get properly crushed grain from them, if you care to try
them out.

Tom Veldhouse



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