Beer at home, easy or difficult?

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How tough is it to learn this well enough to make decent beer? Is it cost
effective?

Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
homebrewing ranges from very easy (all extract) to about as complicated as
you want to make it.

is it cost effective?  i don't homebrew to save money, and probably when you
factor in the cost of equipment, ingredients and time, is more expensive
overall than just running out and picking up something commercially
produced.  i do it for the variety, quality and satisfaction that comes from
"doing it yourself".

bob p

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Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?

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I'll add a bit more... if you like typical American Bud/Miller/Coors
style beers (<$5.00/sixpack), then it is probably not worth it.  If you
like styles with a lot more flavor/character (ie. imports/microbrews)
($8.00+/sixpack), then I find it is quite cost effective.

I hesitate to put numbers in here because they vary a LOT, but: with
extracts, homebrewing might cost up to $20 - $30 for a 5 Gallon batch,
which makes 2 cases.  So, $20/8 = $2.50/sixpack and $30/8 = $3.75/sixpack.
Plus you'll have basic equipment (maybe $75) cost to spread out over X
batches.  Beers with more flavor (more ingredients) cost somewhat more.
That doesn't add in your time/water/etc... and it doesn't subtract out
the value of a fun/interesting/addictive hobby.


Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
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you
from
You have also to take in mind that the more you get in the hobby, the more
you want to upgrade your equipement. I know people who strated doing kits
whit equipement costing around $50 but are now making all grain beers and
using Stainless Stell equipement made for them by professionnal that cost 3
or 4 thousand $$ (the kind where you set mash temp on a digital keypad, open
a few valves, push a button and check the beer making itself). It take a lot
of batchs to make it a sound investement.

For myself, i putting my equipement to go all grain slowly together, i have
now an electrnic scale, a valley mill grain mill and an immersion chiller
that i made. I can use all that to make extract beers but it will be realy
usefull only when i will go all grain.
--
Altair (:-o)>=® (supprimer/remove nospam@ pour répondre/to reply)
"The History of every major Galactic Civilisation tends to pass through
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can we eat? Why do we eat? and Where shall we have lunch?"
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Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
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when
expensive
comes
3
open
lot
have

To learn more about homebrewing, the best online book is:
http://www.howtobrew.com --
Altair (:-o)>=® (supprimer/remove nospam@ pour répondre/to reply)
"The History of every major Galactic Civilisation tends to pass through
three distinct and recognisable phases... characterised by the questions How
can we eat? Why do we eat? and Where shall we have lunch?"
Douglas Adams.



Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
Altair wrote:

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But that equipment is a choice, not a requirement.  I use a 48 qt.
cooler, a 7 gal. AL pot, a converted SS keg, and a propane burner.
That's it...cheap, easy, effective.

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To see the easy, inexpensive way to do all grain, see
www.hdb.org/cascade/dennybrew.

    -------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
Denny - this link apears to be bad....

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more
kits
and
cost
keypad,
a
chiller
realy



Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
MaddMaxx2000 wrote:

Sorry, my bad typing...try

www.hbd.org/cascade/dennybrew

    ---------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_dot_g_dot_conn_at_ci_dot_eugene_dot_or_dot_us

Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
The original poster has had lots of good advice but I'll throw in my two
cents. My best advice would be to hook up with a local club. You can
brew with someone else to learn all the tricks and you can usually
pickup inexpensive equipment as other brewers upgrade.

As for the economy of home brewing it all depends on how much you drink.
The break even point for me is about 1.5yrs. So like the others said, do
it for the hobby.

Personally I'm into it for brewing beers that I can't purchase. One of
my favorite beers is mac-and-jack brewed in seattle, wa. It isn't
available in the bottle so my only choice is to drink it at $3-4/glass
or learn to brew it myself.

Dave

Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?

Altair

Can you provide a list of sources (web sites, etc.) where more advanced
equipment like you
mentioned can be purchased?

Thx


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when
expensive
comes
3
open
lot
have
How



Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
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If you are not afraid of the price, the best place i know is:
http://www.stainlesssteelspec.com You can check  "The Brewing Comerade BC-50"  for homebrewers. They are based
around Montreal, Canada but most of their production are sold in USA.
--
Altair (:-o)>=® (supprimer/remove nospam@ pour répondre/to reply)
"The History of every major Galactic Civilisation tends to pass through
three distinct and recognisable phases... characterised by the questions How
can we eat? Why do we eat? and Where shall we have lunch?"
Douglas Adams.



Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
OH Derric!

  where can I buy Bud or Coors for less than $5.99 a sixpack ?  It's been
six or seven bucks a sixpack here for long as I can remember.

I am heartened by the promising responses within this thread. My first batch
of Cooper's Lager is racked and bottled after a vigorous week of
fermentation at 76 degrees till on day five somebody  told me about
swamping. This lesson probably cost me my first batch as I see very little
activity as the bottles stand



warmest regards

              Yodar in orlando
Life is a lesson, live it and profit from it


--


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you
from


Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?

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batch

The beer will be great - you've done nothing wrong.
Red



Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
RedMan wrote:

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Sorry, but he did...no way you can make a decent lager by fermenting at
76F!  Lagers ferment at 45-55F, then are cold conditioned (that's
"lagering") at 32-35F for several months afterwards.  A lager fermented
at 76F will not have lagerlike characterisitcs.  76F is too high for
pretty much any beer but a few Belgians.

    ---------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_dot_g_dot_conn_at_ci_dot_eugene_dot_or_dot_us

Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?

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Denny,

"Lager" is a term used very loosely in Australia, where the Coopers kits are
made. Technically, to Lager a beer is to store and condition it under strict
temperature conditions - you are quite right. However, Coopers reccommends
fermenting their "lager" at 21 to 27 deg C, or 70 to 81 F.
http://www.coopers.com.au/files/HomeBrew_Instructions.pdf They even say
pitch the yeast at any temperature under 32 deg rather than wait to seal the
fermenter. I suspect this might be an environmental / climate thing - for
the first time this winter it is below 21 C in my brew room - I'm freezing!

This will be a very drinkable batch of beer, even if not competition
standard. I was hoping that the original poster would not get discouraged,
and would continue to make beer.

Talk of $4000 kits, which you have quashed, and strict adherence to
procedures and terms chases new guys away.

Love reading your posts, Denny.

Red



Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
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are
strict
the
freezing!
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Lots of kits use the term Lager when it shouldn't be used, a real lager use
a different type of yeast that is made to work in colder temp. The yeast
provided by Coopers for their lagers kits is the same that they provide for
all kits, it only have the name in common whit a real lager unless you
change yeast and make it at cooler temp.

As for the $4000 kit, i never said that it's a must for going all grain,
it's like a BMW or a Ferrari, you don't need one to go from point A to B but
if you ask how much it cost to go for A to B the answer is that it depends
on what transport type you use, you can use a bus tiket or a BMW and the
price will varry in consequence. The example of the $4000 kit was just to
give perspective of how large the options where.

I know the brewer of an excellent brewpub around here and his receipes are
elaborated and tested on top of his stove with basic and inexpensive
material. Same thing with beers by Bièropholie, a french speaking website of
beers lover who made some beers distributed locally (Calumet, IPA, Golding
Pale Ale, Imperial Stout and Na Zdravy) who where brewed at professionnal
outlet but elaborated on kitchen stove.
--
Altair (:-o)>=® (supprimer/remove nospam@ pour répondre/to reply)
"The History of every major Galactic Civilisation tends to pass through
three distinct and recognisable phases... characterised by the questions How
can we eat? Why do we eat? and Where shall we have lunch?"
Douglas Adams.



Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?


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use
for
but
of
How

Altair,
I actually think your signature says it all!
I think Cooper's call their yeast Ale Yeast, but that is probably another
misnomer.
Cheers,
Red



Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
RedMan wrote:

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Thanks, I was aware of that...it _still_ doesn't make it correct,
though!

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I hope not to discourage new brewers, either, just to help them do it
right!  IIRC, the poster was talking about fermenting at 76F...i've
certainly never made a batch of beer anywhere near that temp. that I'd
consider worth drinking (outside of a couple Belgians).  The poster
should try something cheap and easy like ptting the fermenter in a tub
of ice water...or maybe just develop a liking for the splitting
headaches fermenting at that temp will produce!  :)

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"strict adherence to procedures and terms"...I just figure you might as
well start off learning the correct things, so you can make beer good
enough to get you excited about the hobby...I've run across too many
people who didn't take the time to learn, then made crappy beer and gave
it up.  Besides, that way you don't have to "unlearn" anything and start
over.

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I love talking beer!  Just tryin' to help!

    ----------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_dot_g_dot_conn_at_ci_dot_eugene_dot_or_dot_us

Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
RedMan wrote:
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snip


76 degrees is a bit warm; the yeast might have produced some fusel fuels
that will give you a heck of a headache.  I suppose it also depends upon
the particular strain of yeast you used, but I try to never let my temp
get much higher than 72, and I prefer to keep it in the 68 to 70 degree
range as much as possible.

Bill



Re: Beer at home, easy or difficult?
so that fusel stuff is related to temperature?

--
billb

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about
very little
fuels
upon
temp
degree



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