best sanitation method?

Have a question or want to show off your project? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View


I've been doing the bleach solution (1 tablespoon per gallon of warm water)
since I started brewing and I have never had an infected beer. So in terms
of sanitation, that seems to be working fine.

What I do think I am getting are off flavors from the bleach.

Here is my procedure:
I sanitize my carboys for 30-40 minutes with this solution and then rinse it
out with cold water and allow to drip dry on my carboy stand on top of a
clean kitchen towel.

I use the same solution to sanitize my bottles using a pump spray attachment
to my bottle tree. Three squirts and I let the bottles drip dry. These are
NOT rinsed, though and when I am ready to fill, I just shake out any
residual sanitizer from the bottle and then fill em up. Should I be rinsing
out my bottles, too?

What do you use to sanitize?



Re: best sanitation method?


Joe Murphy wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
This sounds good, except when I used bleach, I rinsed with hot water a
few times and then let dry.  The theory being that the hot water will
dissipate the chlorine better, beside it dries faster.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
These should also be rinsed out,a couple times, again I would use hot water.

Quoted text here. Click to load it
I have both PBW, for cleaning, and a one step, no rinse (that I actually
rinse out), "Oxyclean" type sanitizer. (B-Brite I think) I used to use
bleach, but had a batch go bad, so I stopped. Besides I can use the PBW
on my stainless and not worry about ruining it.
Cheers,

--
Michael Herrenbruck
Herrenbruck Brewery

Re: best sanitation method?


Joe Murphy wrote:

<snip>

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I recently used Iodophor for the first time after 20 years of brewing.
With its ease of use and lack of off flavors imparted to the beer if not
drained completely, I kept thinking "where have you been my entire
life?" :-)
--
Bill

"Wise fool"
Gandalf, THE TWO TOWERS
-- The Wise will remove 'se' to reply; the Foolish will not--



Re: best sanitation method?


Trouble with bleach is its designed to cling to your u-bend...... Much
better to use one made for the job that rinses easier.

Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: best sanitation method?


wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it
The real trouble with using bleach is that it needs to be rinsed.
Unless you are using freshly boiled water to rinse with, you are
basically negating the point of using the bleach in the first place.


Re: best sanitation method?


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Rinsing isn't really a problem for most homebrewers.  I've used bleach
for years and rinsed with municiple water with no problems, ever (many
different locales thus far).

Most people's tap water is treated and has practically no "beer-harmful"
microbes in it.  Well water users are a different matter.

Anyway, sanitization just stacks the deck in favor of your yeast against
any competitiors.  NOTHING we use removes all beasties (unless you
autoclave/pressure cook).

So, unless you have proven that your tap water is high in beer spoiling
microbes, I recommend that you rinse and don't worry (RDWHAHB).

Derric


Re: best sanitation method?


On Tue, 13 Mar 2007 17:52:07 -0000, Derric

Quoted text here. Click to load it

This debate has been ongoing for years and isn't going to end with you
and I.  I don't rinse, but then again I don't use bleach.  I've NEVER
used bleach.  I've used iodophor since I started brewing.  I love the
fact that it sanitizes much quicker and does not have to be rinsed.


Re: best sanitation method?



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Agreed... I didn't want to start/continue the debate ... I just wanted
to let the original poster know that tap water rinses are used by a lot
of people and don't pose any undue infection risk in most locations.


Quoted text here. Click to load it

I've used bleach for 18 years with absolutely no problems.  HOWEVER, I
do agree that there are drawbacks to bleach that other sanitizers don't
have (but bleach has advantages too... cheap, widely available, probably
already at your house, etc.).  I recently got a bottle of StarSan and I
definitely like it for the short contact time and the no rinse - both
pretty big time savers over bleach.

Derric


Re: best sanitation method?


Joe,

I have aleways used bleach as a sanitiser & in concentrations much stronger
than you describe.
I always thoroughly rinse everything that has been in contact with bleach
solution in either hot water (we have  low cost hot water thanks to a highly
efficient solar water heater) or in filtered cold water which has passed
through our underbench system (0.5 micron particle filter then over
activated charcoal).
The free flowing hot water suits me best because the flow rate is higher.
However I do not normally bother to use the bleach sanitiser method on my
bottles, perhaps an occasional bottle which I think looks dirty or where I
can see a hint of a ringmark mark inside the top.
My bottles are thoroughly washed within 12 hours of use in the hot water &
allowed to dry upside down in my bottle rack which is normally left outside
in the sun for anything up to 3 or 4 days. My theory is that the Queensland
sun is strong enough to sanitise anything.
This works & I have never had any individual bottle taste off.
I used to occasionally get off flavours in my beer , but that was many years
ago, & whilst I never positively found the cause I believe it developed
during the brewing phase. My techniques are tighter & somewhat different
these days - no problems ever.
Except I am still chasing that elusive Heinecken taste & frankly I am still
miles away.

Pete


Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: best sanitation method?



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not to highjack this thread, but ...  I tried and tried to reproduce the
taste of Pilsner Urquell.  I made very good pilsners, but it was never
"quite the same."

Then one day, due to odd circumstances, I ended up leaving a bottle of
my latest attempt in the basement sink and forgot about it.  That sink
gets a slight amount of morning sun only.  A few days later I thought
I'd try the beer, so put it in the fridge.  Not so surprisingly, it had
that elusive taste of PU.

So, at least in the US, part of the standard taste of most imported
lagers is "light skunk."  I don't know how imports there are treated,
but it is difficult to get unskunked imported beer since most use green
or clear bottles and most get exposed to sunlight or florescent light.

You may want to take a bottle of your best attempt and put it in the sun
for a while.  If the bottle is brown, I understand that skunking happens
FAST, so pour it up into a clear glass and let it sit in the sun.

BTW, I liked the unskunked version best after all!  I imagine that it is
more like what PU would taste locally.

Derric


Re: best sanitation method?


Derric wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Not if you purchase carefully...around here, it's easy to get PU or
other imp[orts in pristine condition.
 
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Actually, brown filters out the part of the UV spectrum responsible for
the skunk.  Green and clear are the worst.

    ---------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60...1.060, that is.

Re: best sanitation method?


It may be related to the ph of the water. For the best results, bleach
should be used in water with a ph of 8.0. If you get too far away from that,
it won't be as effective.

Charlie Talley (founder of Star San) recommends a bleach solution of 80,000
ppm. That's about one ounce per five gallons (maybe two tablespoons). He
also recommends adding an equal amount of vinegar (though not together!), At
that level, he says it doesn't even need rinsing.

Charlie talks with James Spencer on the March 29 episode of Basic Brewing
Radio (http://www.basicbrewing.com/index.php?page=radio). It's a great
episode explaining how to use bleach effectively as a sanitizer.

John.


Quoted text here. Click to load it




Re: best sanitation method?
Why would you add vinigar if you want a ph of 8? Vinigar would take nutral
ph7 water down. If I remember my swimming pool days. high ph eg 8 makes
chlorine more effective but for a shorter period of time (chlorine disipates
quickly at high ph).  lower ph 6 - 7 is more stable.  I try to keep my ph
between 6.8 and 7.0 for disinfecting.
Quoted text here. Click to load it



Site Timeline