Coopers Home Brew

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Hi;
Friends in Australia tell me Coopers Home Brew is excellent - But they that
about anything Ozzish.

Any experience of it?

Regards
Bob



Re: Coopers Home Brew
: Hi;
: Friends in Australia tell me Coopers Home Brew is excellent - But they
that
: about anything Ozzish.
:
: Any experience of it?
:
: Regards
: Bob
:
:

You're definitely right about 'anything Ozzish', so, as a non-Aussie living
here, I can tell you that in my experience, Cooper's HB is alright (though
the main thing that I'm talking about is the yeast, as that's really what
separates most "kits" from others).  Not great, possibly not even 'good',
and absolutely not excellent.  That said, it's not bad either (and just fine
if you use decent yeast), but I'm known by my friends as being a bit of a
beer snob, so take this with the proverbial grain of salt.

Cheers,
Joe.

--


_____________________________________________________
Apparently, 1 in 5 people in the world are Chinese. And there
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younger brother Ho-Cha-Chu. But I think it's Colin.



Re: Coopers Home Brew
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Coopers is a wonderful brewery, turning out some classic, world class
products.

Yes, it's true that Ozzies are a bit (very) one eyed about anything Oz,
and are no different when it comes to their beer, Coopers in particular.

Interesting then, that the 'Old Man Cooper' studied all about beer
brewing at Birmingham University, in the UK.

THAT'S why his beer is so good!!!!

--
Ian

Re: Coopers Home Brew
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the brewery is wonderful, the red green gold and brown or something. very
nice beer. but he was asking about the home-brew ingredients, which from my
experience, are basically the same as any of the other $9-10 brewing tins.



Re: Coopers Home Brew
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Yes, I have to agree with you there. I was letting my enthusiasm for the
bottled beer cloud (get it!) my judgement.

Of course, if you want a top home brew, you have no choice but to source
your own malted barley, and mash it yourself. Do it right, and the
results are incomparable, and you will never go back to using kits
again!

I just wish we could get the Coopers Sparkling Ale here in the UK a
little more easily. That and the Matilda Bay 'Redback' wheat beer are
both very fine beers, as I remember.

Cheers,
Ian  
--
Ian McKay

Re: Coopers Home Brew
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understandable. your forgiven. but maybe not for the pun.

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how much more effort does it take to do it that way??? maybe i'll give that
a shot soon. i have final school exams in the next month then off for about
3 months, so that should be sufficient time to try out some new brewing
methods.

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yes, i am quite partial to the redback aswell. lovely drop. pity all you can
get is fosters hey.



Re: Coopers Home Brew
samuel mcgregor wrote:

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It takes a fair bit more time.  I can whip out an extract batch in 2
hopurs, but an AG batch takes about 5.  And that's after optimizng my
equipment and brewing space...figure 7 hours for a batch until you
become familiar with the techniques.  The results are well worth it,
though...you have access to a much broader range of ingredients, you
have more control over the process, and I really enjoy the whole brewing
process itself.

    ----------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Coopers Home Brew

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source
that
about

two hours??? i can do it in about 30 mins. is there something i am
missing???



Re: Coopers Home Brew
samuel mcgregor wrote:

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You're probably doping a no boil kit...I'm not.  Boiling for an hour,
cooling it down after, setting up and putting away...about 2 hours. As I
remember...it's been years since I've doen anything but all grain.

    ------------>Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Coopers Home Brew
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Once you have a routine worked out, you can mash, sparge, boil and get
25 litres ready for yeast pitching in half a morning. The satisfaction
is enormous, I can assure you!

You do need to give a little thought to the logistics of the process
though. Mash temperatures are critical, the closer you can get to the
temperature specified in your recipe the better. I use an electric urn,
originally designed for fruit preserving and bottling, and a hand held
thermometer!

After mashing, I have a system which works for me quite well whereby I
have a barrel of hot sparging water at high elevation, which gives a
good head of pressure to my sparging arm, and hence a good spin, whilst
at the same time I am running off the sparged wort out of my mash tun
(which is at an intermediate elevation) into my fermenter, which is on
the floor.

I urge you to try it, believe me, you won't look back!

Good luck.

--
Ian

Re: Coopers Home Brew
mckay@kremmen.demon.co.uk says...
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Which of the Coopers are you referring to - the original Thomas Cooper,
who started out as a stone mason and turned his hand to brewing at the
request of his wife? http://www.coopers.com.au/default2.asp and click on
History, then Brewery for a little more info.

Cheers
--
Quod subigo farinam

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Re: Coopers Home Brew
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What a great web site.

I will dig out the publication I read that bit of information about
Birmingham, but it may take me some time to find it, but I seem to
remember it was immediately post WW2. Who was Coopers MD at that time?

Watch this space!

 
Ian
London.

Re: Coopers Home Brew
I have used a few Coopers kits and first thing is to get rid of the
yeast, it is way too aggressive, I have used a safale yeast and had much
better results. I will soon be using some liquid yeast. The Coopers
wheat beer pack is good. I don't use sugar either I double the amount of
malt extract and get good results. Buy from your local brew shop as the
cans you find in supermarkets are generally old and close to their use
by date. This was noted by another poster too.

Re: Coopers Home Brew
Bob Hallsworth wrote:
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They seem to be great there, but they also do not seem to travel well.
A lot of cidery tasting beers have been traced to old extract in
Cooper's kits.

    --------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_dot_g_dot_conn_at_ci_dot_eugene_dot_or_dot_us

Re: Coopers Home Brew
On Sun, 26 Oct 2003 22:34:29 +0000 (UTC), "Bob Hallsworth"

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Aussie aussie aussie...OI OI OI

Re: Coopers Home Brew
Bob Hallsworth wrote:
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I find the kits a good starting base. I wouldn't follow the kit
instructions which recommend the addition of one kg of sugar and a final
volume of 22 litres. Without extras the beer is very plain
I usually add a kilo of dry malt extract, crystal grains or equivalent
and some extra hops for bittering, flavour and aroma to suit my tastes.
This results in a beer of approx 5% ABV (maybe a bit less) and medium SG
The yeast provided with the kit is OK, especially if you can only
ferment at higher temps maybe up to 25 degrees C. It actually seems to
hibernate at 18 or less (or work very slowly). Personally I've been very
happy with WLP002 English ale yeast when used with some of the coopers kits.
cheers
rb


Re: Coopers Home Brew

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that

Coopers is good as a basis for a beer but it does need some malt and hops to
get a good flavour. I also tend to add maltodextrin for a bit more body



Re: Coopers Home Brew

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that

Thanks all - I used to brew from raw ingredients, but my wife wasn't a fan
of the aroma that used to permeate the house. The one I liked best was
"London Pride" from a small book of recipes I had at the time. {18 years
ago - sigh}

{I didn't mind it at all!}

Bob



Re: Coopers Home Brew
Hi,

I have just made and sampled a Coopers Heritage Lager made with light liquid
malt and it came out great....better then I expected and my mates wanted
more so that is always a good sign. I have tried one other Coopers Draught
that I didnt particularly like.

Regards
David
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Re: Coopers Home Brew
G'Day Bob
I have been brewing Coopers kits for fifteen years now. They were one of the
original home brews on the market in Australia. I have made every product
they have on the market and have enjoyed them all. They are well suited for
kegging purposes. I have two kegs on the go, one with a Coopers beer in all
the time and the other I experiment with. As far as making the beer from a
Coopers kit, they are a no fuss brew to make. I guess you could experiment
with the basic kits until you make a consistent product, then you can start
adding extra's like hops, honey or what ever takes your fancy.
Oh yes, I am also a bit biased towards Coopers as I only work a couple of
kilometers away from their brewery.

Regards...Dave
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