Cost of batch - Page 3

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Re: Cost of batch


You could possibly get the base grains cheaper if you find a Brewpub near
you and talk to the brewmaster. That's what I did and I get my base grains
for $20.00 a 50lb sack.
Sometimes they will even kick down yeast if you talk to them nice enough.

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Re: Cost of batch


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What do you use as a base grain, whatever two row you can get?



Re: Cost of batch


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Thanks for the info. What do you use as a "base grain"? Just whatever
two row you can get? I'd like to learn a LOT more about all grain
before I try it for the first time. Seems that everything I read about
it contradicts what I previously read! What system do you use? I'd
like to do something akin to a combination mash tun - lauter tun, like
a round cooler with a manifold or false bottom. Then I'll need a wort
pot big enough for the whole five gallon batch, and would look into
getting two, to do a ten gallon batch! Also, I'll need to make a wort
chiller out of copper tubing. What length would you think that needs
to be? Thanks for any information!


Re: Cost of batch


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OK,
As for what grain I use, typically I pick an American 2row.  Usually I
get it from one of the online stores. Typically I try to find a
lightly kilned pale malt, because I have also adopted the decoction
mash technique with which I can turn the palest malt alone into a deep
amber if I want.

My mash tun is a 5.5 gallon Igloo round "Max" drink cooler.  I
transfer it all to my lauter tun which is made from an older
rectangular cooler (30-40 quart size, I don't really know) that I have
built a CPVC manifold system in, rather than a false bottom.  The
manifold is a series of 1/2 inch tubes fit together in a ladder shape
covering the bottom of the cooler spaced about 1 inch apart.  The
bottom sides of each of these is saw cut about 1/3 to 1/2 way
through.  I did it on the bottom because then the weight of the grains
above won't press the grains into the slots.  The manifold is
connected to a fitting I made also out of CPVC which replaces the old
drain valve on the cooler and leads to a ball valve and elbow down for
a spigot.  If, on the rare occasion I'm using a lighter grain bill in
the recipe I was concerned about haveing a too shallow grainbed, I did
leave the option of dropping a pot full of water into the cooler first
to reduce the area for the grains.  Seems to work really well.  I also
made a sparge sprinkler our of the extra CPVC by drilling some holes
(1/16th inch) through the sides of the tubing and a few connectors to
make a ring which I brace accross the top of the cooler.  I usually
use my bottling bucket to hold the sparge water and regulate the flow
with the attached valve.

The boil pots I use are ones I picked up from a restaraunt that was
closing up.  I have a 10 and a 15 gallon stock pot depending on the
batch.  The chiller is made from a 50 ft coil of copper tubing (3/8
inch)  20 feet are used in an ice bath coil which chills the water
down to near freezing before it reaches the boil pot, where the
remaining 30 feet are immersed.  The two coils are connected with
clear vinyl tubing.  The hot side gets a little soft if I slow the
flow down too much, but turning up the flow a little ensures that I
won't heat up that side too much.

My setup isn't pretty, but it works well.  One note, the only fittings
I glued in the lauter tun were the valve and trhough hull connections
so that I could pull the whole thing apart for easy cleaning
afterward.  After all with all the holes cut in it, I don't really
think I have to worry about it leaking.
D


Re: Cost of batch


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I'm thinking of using just a rectangular ice chest for both mash and
lauter. Is there any reason why I can't mash in the same vessel?
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I'm probably going to start doing 10 gallon batches once I get the
hang of all grain. But I may want to do some five gallon batches, so
I'll keep your idea of a pot of water to take up space in the cooler.
Will a 40 quart cooler be big enough for about any 10 gallon batch?
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I'm going to start on mine tonight!



Re: Cost of batch


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Mine's something like a 36 quart and I could easily triple my grain
load in it.  I usually do 5 gallon batches because I have three
fermentors which I try to keep in constant rotation, one in primary
fermentation, one in secondary fermentation, and one clean to take the
new batch.  I would imagine that the 40 quart could handle a ten
gallon batch with somehting like 25-28 pounds of grain in it.

Plenty of folks mash and lauter in the same can.  I don't because I
like to stir with vigor when I mix the mash. Doing that causes the
fines and the grain to get impacted into the openings of the lauter
system.  At least the one that I was using.  Transferring the grains
and barleyjuice to the second cooler is easy enough so I just never
saw the need to condense the system.
D


Re: Cost of batch


I use Cargill pale 2-row for mase grain I batch sparge in 1 10 gallon
Rubbermaid cooler.


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Re: Cost of batch



I'd say it isn't about cheap, it's about good. Cost irrelevant (within
reason).


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Re: Cost of batch



Without testing, why call copper bad? It's been used in brewing for
hundreds of
years.


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Re: Cost of batch


Copper isn't a problem, it's brass that contains small amounts of lead.
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Re: Cost of batch


wrote:
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As I said, I wasn't calling copper bad.  I was actually attempting to
point out something I observed and actually was wondering if anyone
else had some comparitive data.  I wasn't meaning to imply that the
copper was bad for us. After all, copper is an essential nutrient,
check you multivitamins.  I was pondering the effect on the yeast and
weather it inhibited their reproduction.  My experiential data implies
that it does, slightly, but it's in no way enough data to make a
judgement.  Last night I tried an experiment.  I brewed two identical
batches, one was in my CPVC constructed lauter tun, and the second was
in my buddy's copper manifolded tun.  Otherwise these batches were
identical recipies and processes, or at least as near as we could make
it.  I pitched the yeast, (cultivated from my private stock) in equal
quantities to each fermentor at 6:00 as the snow fell outside.  By
9:45 the CPVC batch had begun bubbling, and the copper batch didn't
start by the time I went to bed at 11:45 but was rolling along nicely
this morning when I went out to shovel snow off my drive.

Please don't think that I'm advocating my system over the anyone
else's.  If you make beer that's good. If you make good beer that's
better, but a lot of good beer is best.  I wasn't indicating that the
copper was bad for you or that it was not a time proven brewing
material.  Then again, why call lead bad, it was used in plumbing for
thousands of years.(rhetorical question, please don't bother to
respond to that, I know why lead is bad.)  If no-one experiments,
we'll never discover anything.

I'll let you know if there's a flavor difference between the two
batches.
D


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