Drat, no fermentation!

Have a question or want to show off your project? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View
DH and I are back to brewing after a long abscence. For this batch, we
wanted to forgo wasting a pool full of water by using the wart
chiller, so he added ice instead of water to the wort to cool it. We
cooled it down too far, though -- but then I looked at our yeast and
it was not fresh, so we decided to let the wort return to room temp
overnight, go get some fresh yeast and pitch it the next day.

From our local brew supply store we picked up some British Ale Yeast
from White Labs and pitched it into the 72 degree wart, after the tube
of yeast itself had warmed to room temperature (during which time we
couldn't help but shake it and look at it).

Here are are 24 hours later without a single bit of activity.

My questions:

1. Does something happen to the sugar molecules when you cool it too
low, or leave it sit overnight, so that the yeast can't get its party
on?

2. Should we try pitching another thing of yeast in it; could the
yeast have been dead?

3. Should we just trash it and start over?

Amy

Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Amy Young-Leith wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I had the same thing happen with white labs liquid yeast.  I just aerated it
by shaking the carboy or swirling as it were and waited.  Sure enough it
started right up in another 24 hours.  Relax, have a homebrew


Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Amy Young-Leith wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

No


It's possible the yeast wasn't very viable.  You should ignore the
marketing hypoe that says the yeast is "pitchable" and ALWAYS make a
starter.  Not on;ly does it increase the yeast population to a usable
amount, it;s a way to verify the viability of the yeast.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

No...24 hours isn't a long lag time, consdiering you underpitched it.
Did you aerate the wort?  If not, do that next time, too!

    ----------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Quoted text here. Click to load it
How about aerate immediately.  It's not too late, and would still help,
wouldn't you say?
Ken



Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Ken Anderson wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I think I'd be concerned that fermentation is already under way..at this
point, I'd just leave it alone for another day or so and see what
happens.  I've ruined beers by taking "corrective" action, so I'm a bit
gunshy!

    ----------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Quoted text here. Click to load it
I say this because I've given lagers (typical slow starters at 52F) a second
jolt of O2 18 hours after pitching.  Seems I read somewhere that it's an ok
thing to do.
Ken



Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Ken Anderson wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yeah, I've heard that, too, although I've never done it.  I think as
long as you're sure fermentation hasn't started, it's OK. Probably even
if there's been a little fermentation, the yeast would consume the O@
and you'd still be OK.  I know Dan Schultz does it, and he makes some
fantastic beers.

    ------------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Drat, no fermentation!

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I've waited days for that foam to surface on somewhat stale yeast.  No
biggie.



Re: Drat, no fermentation!
I hate to be picky but it's called wort (pronounced 'wart')


Sorry, I had to.....


Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Spanky wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Actually, it's pronounced "wert"...

    ----------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Denny Conn wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it
Depends if you've learned german high, or german low
-gc

Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Hmmm...  This reminds of a recent thread about changing light bulbs.    ; )



Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Really???

I feel a bit stupid now :(

If this is true I'll have to find a new LHBS, I have been grossly
misinformed......



Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Spanky wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

No need...a lot of people apparently mispronounce it!

Quoted text here. Click to load it

If that's the worst of the misinformation they give you, it's not bad!

    ------------>Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Drat, no fermentation!

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I wouldn't worry about the LHBS.  A lot of us on the 'Net have never
heard a lot of these words pronounced - only written!

Here is a basic explanation from this group back in 1997 (Google!),
plus some others of interest.  Note that wort is from Old English, not
from German!  The Old English spelling (wyrt) probably explains the
pronounciation:

    Wort is a liquid formed by soaking mash in hot water and then
    fermenting it to make beer. The word comes from the Old English
    wyrt, meaning root or herb and is akin to the Old High German
    wurze, or brewer's wort.

    Brewers remove trub, a haze that forms on wort during either
    its boiling or its cooling phase, from the liquid. Why? Well,
    a look at the word's etymological ancestry might explain: trub
    comes from German and is related to words meaning dim, murky,
    turbid, muddy, dirty, and dregs.

    Some brewing terms perform double duty. Wort that is fermenting
    is known as krausen. The same term is also used as a verb refering
    to the process of adding strong, newly fermenting wort to beer
    to produce natural carbonation. Krausen comes from a German verb
    meaning to curl back from the edge, a description of the beer's
    foam during this process.

    A beer made in one brewing is called a gyle, and fermenting
    wort added to ale or stout is also called gyle. Gyle is another
    Germanic word; it's derived from a Middle Dutch word for boil
    or ferment.

Derric


Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Derric wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it
<snippage>

Here's a good place to hear a lot of brewing terms pronounced (as well
as a lot of other great info!).

http://www.bodensatz.com/staticpages/index.php?page=20020410072601767
    ---------->Denny


--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Drat, no fermentation!
Derric wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

I'd always thought that too until I got jumped on by someone in this
group. Even http://www.beerhunter.com/styles/krausen.html supports that
notion of krausening

however

http://www.bodensatz.com/staticpages/index.php?page=Procedures-FAQ#kraeusening
suggests otherwise.

I've also read that 'krausening' or apparently the more correct
'Speisegabe' (ie late addition of unfermented wort [gyle!]) can be done
to also 'clean' up the beer. Apparently the late burst from the yeast
(due to the addition of more sugar) also allows the yeast to metabolise
other components (presumably not so desirable in beer) leading to a
better beer.
Can anyone add to this?
cheers
rb

Site Timeline