Fermentation stopped?

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Hi,

I've just started my first ever batch. The fermentation started nicely on
Saturday evening, and bubbled away. However, today evening (2 days later)
it seems to have stopped almost completely. It was bubbling a lot just 8
hours ago. The instructions say it should take 2-6 days, depending on the
amount of sugar. I added a little more sugar than the instructions said,
so it should take longer. But it seems to be done just after 2 days. Is
this normal? Anything I should check?

TIA

--
Matta


Re: Fermentation stopped?
Matta wrote:
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It's certainly not impossible that it's done.  What temp is it at?
Higher temps make fermentation go faster, although if it gets too high
you'll experience some off flavors.

    -------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_dot_g_dot_conn_at_ci_dot_eugene_dot_or_dot_us

Re: Fermentation stopped?
On Mon, 10 May 2004 11:31:59 -0700, Denny Conn wrote:

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It's about 24 degrees (should be between 20-25). However, I did have it
open for about half a minute, tasted it, and now, an hour later it's
bubbling away again. Did the air help it? Should it be opened every now
and then so that the yeast gets air? I'm new at this :-)

--
Matta


Re: Fermentation stopped?
Matta wrote:

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Well, to start with, that's a LOT warmer than I'd recommend fermenting
for best results.  Your 24C translates to my 75F...in general, you want
to keep temps below 70F(21C) and better at 65-67F (18-19C).  You'll make
better tasting beer and get fewer headache inducing fusel alcohols.
Also, it sounds like you're fermenting in a bucket.  It's not at all
uncommon to not get a tight seal on the lid, allowing CO2 to leak out
around the edges instead of going through your airlock...it's not a
problem in any way other than the perception that nothing is happening!
Most likely, when you replaced the lid, you got a better seal and that's
why you're seeing bubbles now.  What was the OG?  Take a hydrometer
reading and see what it is now.  That's the only sure way to tell what's
going on.

    -------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_dot_g_dot_conn_at_ci_dot_eugene_dot_or_dot_us

Re: Fermentation stopped?
On Mon, 10 May 2004 12:18:43 -0700, Denny Conn wrote:

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Don't have a cooler place so it'll have to do for now. The lid hadn't been
touched since it worked last, but that might have been the problem. So the
fermenting process doesn't need air?
I actually don't have a hydrometer and didn't take the first reading. I'm
gonna get one, but this first batch will become something of a mystery ;-)
Should the beer be mixed or something before it's bottled? Or is it always
a good mixture? I wouldn't want to have some bottles with watery beer and
some with very strong beer.

Thanks for your help!

--
Matta


Re: Fermentation stopped?
)
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ack, no unless you want sediment and yeast to be thoroughly mixed
through your beer.  The alcohol doesn't float on top or sink to the
bottom, it forms a homogenous-solution, unlike say oil and water where
they would seperate, so the alcohol should be consistent throughout your
brew.

Are you racking to a carboy for secondary fermentation or just going to
bottle from the primary? Ssecondary fermentation is not necessary but is
generally recomended for better clarity, longer shelflife and a more
mature tasting beer.  Either way you are going to have to add priming
sugar before you bottle so it's carbonated (unless you are doing a keg
with forced carbonation) and i think it's generally recomneded you
transfer to another santized container before adding the priming sugar
so that when you mix it in you are not stiring up sediment. Generally
this would be from your carboy after secondary fermentaton into your
sanitised primary fermentor with the priming sugar solution.

hope this helps, and if i've made any errs i'm sure someone will correct
me soon enough :)

happy brewing

Re: Fermentation stopped?
On Mon, 10 May 2004 20:18:52 +0000, steve wrote:

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I'm gonna bottle it directly from the primary (and add sugar in the
process). This is my first batch, if I'll do more I'll think about buying
better equipment (so that I can do secondary fermentation, etc). Thanks
for the help.

--
Matta


Re: Fermentation stopped?
Matta wrote:

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Not once it's started.  It's a good idea to aerate your wort by shaking
or stirring (or something) when you first pitch your yeast, though.  The
yeast uses the O2 in the wort to synthesize sterols that it uses to
build cell walls for yeast growth.  Once fermentation has started,
though, you want to avoid aerating the wort.  It will give it a "wet
carboard" or sherry-like taste if you do.  But opening the fermenter for
a few minutes certainly won't hurt...it won't help, but it won't hurt!

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The action of fermentation will do all the mixing you need...you'll be
fine.  I highly recommend you get a hydrometer and learn to use it,
though.  They're cheap, easy to use, and can give you a lot of
information about what's going on in your beer.

    ---------->Denny


--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_dot_g_dot_conn_at_ci_dot_eugene_dot_or_dot_us

Re: Fermentation stopped?
On Mon, 10 May 2004 13:25:17 -0700, Denny Conn wrote:

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Ok. Thanks a lot for the info! The site (howtobrew.com) looks great,
thanks for the tip!

--
Matta


Re: Fermentation stopped?
I thought the wet cardboard/sherry flavours were due to HSA - so I thought I
just read somewhere.

Life begins at 49 - 49 twaddle, that is.

--

-- --
reply newsgroup or unscramble address. . . Steve W.
-- --
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been
the
I'm
;-)
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always
and



Re: Fermentation stopped?
Matta wrote:
 
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BTW, if you haven't seen it already, check out www.howtobrew.com for
some great info!

    -------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_dot_g_dot_conn_at_ci_dot_eugene_dot_or_dot_us

Re: Fermentation stopped?
Depends strongly on temp. and yeast strain also.  I usually ferment my ales
at around 70 deg. F (due mostly to the fact that I can't control the temp
and that is the temp in the house) and after a couple of days, most of the
action has ceased.  I leave them in the primary for a total of 5-7 days and
then put in a secondary for another couple of weeks or so, depending on how
the beer is clearing.  Very little fermentation goes on in the secondary; I
could put it in the secondary earlier but I like to have a bit more of the
solids drop out of it in the primary so I leave it there for a week.

I would wait a good week before attempting to bottle if I was not going to
use a secondary fermentation.  If the fermentation got off to a good start
and the temp was kept above 60 deg., chances are overwhelmingly in favor of
no problems.  Just let it go.


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