Granny's Beer

Have a question or want to show off your project? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View
Found in a Cook-book from 1967.

  Before botlling and filtering, boil corks, bottles,
  and a clean kitchen towel for 15 minutes.

  In 19 quart of water add 12oz hop and 1 little bag of
  Kneipp (roasted barley for making coffee-like beverage,
  1/2lb). Cook in covered pot for two hours. Remove from
  heat, filter through a sterilized kitchen cloth, add 1lb
  table sugar, cover and let it cool down.

  In a lukewarm wort add 1oz yeast and let it stand
  covered for 4-5 hours. Remove white foam. The beer is
  ready to bottle.

  Fasten corks with rope and let the beer ripen in a
  basement or other cool place for three months.

Comments please. Any suggestions for improvements (ale or
lager yeast, hop, table or candy sugar, etc.) ? I'd like to
try this before getting into serious brewing. But, this is
also serious, right ? I mean, it's in the real cook-book.
How does it taste ? Did someone try this ?


Re: Granny's Beer
Olix wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Sorry, converting from metric measures 3,5 dekagram hop, I
got it wrongly 12oz. The correct result is 1,2 ounce.

Re: Granny's Beer
What the hell!  Try it!  You'll have a great story for the other
homebrewers.

Don't have high expectations, however.

Olix wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Re: Granny's Beer
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Try that recipe and you'll NEVER get into serious brewing!  Seriously.  It
will suck.
Start here:  http://www.howtobrew.com/


Re: Granny's Beer
I dont normally take the role of a beer snob but...

I have to agree with Ken here on this one.  That sounds primitive even for
1967.  Are you sure you dont mean 1867?  I kid, but seriously, that will not
taste much like anything you've ever had (if you're lucky).  If you want to
get into brewing, find a store near you or go on line and buy a kit.  Read
some of the links on the basics of brewing that will certainly be posted
here.

Making beer that is drinkable and more interesting than anything you will
get commercially is the easiest thing in the world.  The only question is
crazy you decide to get and how complicated you want the process to be.

Good luck.

Quoted text here. Click to load it



Re: Granny's Beer

Quoted text here. Click to load it
Snipping done.

What do you mean 1867. My Dad and I made pretty good beer back then. We
didn't have all the new fangled gadgets we have today but we made some
pretty good darn beer. We still brew some of the old recipes today.
BTW: My APA is ready and I have been "testing" it. It is 6:06 PM , please
ignore any of my posts from now until tomorrow.
Tom



Re: Granny's Beer
Olix wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it
Just shy of five gallons of water, with one pound of sugar and some
roasted barley for flavor, fermented in the bottle? That sounds like a
soda-pop recipe along the lines of root-beer or ginger ale.
Whatever it is, it isn't beer.

Karl S.
--
And whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant.
Matthew 20:27 KJV

Re: Granny's Beer
Olix wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it


I really doubt this is a real recipe for anything.  More authentic
old-timey crap beer would be made with a 3 pound can of Blue Ribbon malt
syrup (hopped), a malt can of white sugar, enough warm water to make 5
gallons, and a cake of bread yeast.  Cover to keep the flies out, and
bottle in a week or two when the bubbling stops.

Not that I would ever condone such a thing,
Bob

Re: Granny's Beer

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Some stories in my family say that bottling was not necessary.  They just
ladled it out of the fermenter.

I have my great-grandfather's bottles!



Re: Granny's Beer
Quoted text here. Click to load it

They liked their beer flat?

Re: Granny's Beer

Quoted text here. Click to load it

They liked it alcoholic.



Re: Granny's Beer
zxcvbob wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

If it's got canned extract, it can't be that old, at least not in
paleozymurgical terms.

Speaking of old times, has anyone ever read [the Finnish folk epic] The
Kalevala?  I've been reading it, and it seems a wife's domestic duties
include malting of grain (in the sauna) for brewing.

--
Theodore M. Kloba * heytud@yahoo.com
http://www.geocities.com/heytud/

Site Timeline