Guiness clone question

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I have made many Guinness clones and they all taste great, except
there missing that little something. I have read that in the original
they use 3% pasteurized soured beer, and mix it in with the new. Has
anybody tried this? If so, how did you go about it.? Thanks.

Troy

Re: Guiness clone question
Troy wrote:

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who cares?!? Guiness is overrated.. I tried it once and all I got was some
kickass stout that was too pricey.  I'd like to know how to brew a
chocolate oatmeal stout.

Re: Guiness clone question
G_cowboy_is_that_a_Gnu_Hurd? wrote:

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That was certainly a helpful response to the question.  

michael

Re: Guiness clone question
Troy wrote:
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That rumor has been around for years.  I have never found anything to
give credence to it.

    ------------>Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Guiness clone question
I've read that too but cannot for the life of me detect any lactic or
sour quality in Guinness. All I ever really taste in there is roasted
malt and ... well, that's about all. I think Guinness is pretty
one-dimensional as stouts go - maybe that explains its popularity.

Let's see, to sour 3 percent of 5 gallons you would need to sour 567.8
ml. Maybe you could collect 500 ml worth of wort from your next batch,
let it sit in the open for a while until sour, then transfer into a pot
or something and heat to about 170 degrees farenheight, then add it to
your next Guinness clone. I would bet though, that much sour beer added
to your recipe would be QUITE nasty and I would also imagine that it
would taste nothing like Guinness but who knows?


Re: Guiness clone question
Yea that does sound nasty:) Thanks for the reply's.
Troy

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Re: Guiness clone question
I've read that too but cannot for the life of me detect any lactic or
sour quality in Guinness. All I ever really taste in there is roasted
malt and ... well, that's about all. I think Guinness is pretty
one-dimensional as stouts go - maybe that explains its popularity.

Let's see, to sour 3 percent of 5 gallons you would need to sour 567.8
ml. Maybe you could collect 500 ml worth of wort from your next batch,
let it sit in the open for a while until sour, then transfer into a pot
or something and heat to about 170 degrees farenheight, then add it to
your next Guinness clone. I would bet though, that much sour beer added
to your recipe would be QUITE nasty and I would also imagine that it
would taste nothing like Guinness but who knows?


Re: Guiness clone question
Troy wrote:
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I have made many Guinness clones and have yet to find the perfect one.
There are many varieties of Guinness and some of the lactic acid
"naysayers" may not have tried the versions that have the "tang."  I
don't taste the lactic acid tang at all in the Guinness draught bottles
or the Guinness draught cans, both of which I believe were developed
more for the American palate.  However, I definitely taste the lactic
acid "tang" in the Guinness extra stout bottles which are my favorites.
  I have never tried the Guinness foreign extra stout so I can't make a
claim to this beer's "tang" factor.  I am going to take my most recent
Guinness clone recipe and add some soured/pasteurized stout to it for my
next batch of brew.  I have added 20cc of lactic acid before in the past
and got fairly good results.  I am, however, curious as to what others
have done in order to achieve the "tang."

--
Ken Powers
http://PowersBrewery.home.comcast.net/
Re: Guiness clone question
If you want Guinness go to Ireland  If you want to brew stout , brew stout !
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Re: Guiness clone question
Hello, long time lurker, first time poster....

Have you tried milk?  That may just satisfy your dose o' lactose.

Kent

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Re: Guiness clone question
Troy, try "infecting" it with Brettanomyces.  I've done it and it works. The
bottled Guiness from Ireland has the classic leather, horse blanket
character that the shit that they're now brewing at Molson in Canada lacks.
A long time bottled Guinness fan who no longer drinks the shit brewed in
Canada.

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Re: Guiness clone question
Telesma wrote:
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Another nice addition is a few oak chips in the secondary fermenter.  To
give that slight "oaky" taste.

--
Ken Powers
http://PowersBrewery.home.comcast.net/
Re: Guiness clone question
my recommendation is NOT to do it. Used lactic acid or acid malt
(acidulated) instead. Setting out wort to sour from wild bacteria will prove
to give unpredictable results, at best. Rob

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