Hops question

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Hello!

After quite a few successes with recipes and kits, I'm ready to start
branching out on my own and experimenting with different types of
ingredients to come up with something unique to call my own. I've always
love to cook, and have become quite adept at inventing recipes that have
happily surprised my families and friends.

My first attempt is going to be a bock. In all the beer recipes I've used
before, the hops have been fuggle. I've read up on the different types
available, but wanted to ask to see if there's a type of  hops out there
that would be unique to use. I like to experiment and try new things, but
don't want to spoil a batch just because I picked the wrong type of
ingredients.

Any suggestions on branching out with hops? Are there some really neat
varieties out there?

Thanks for the tips in advance!
-Ryan



Re: Hops question
Ryan,

As far as unique varieties of hops, I couldn't tell ya.  One thing that I've
enjoyed experimenting with right from the beginning, though, has been spices
and fruits...just the right amount of cinnamon or somesuch can add an
interesting dimension to a beer's flavor.  I'm planning a pumpkin ale this
fall and a spruce and spice holiday ale this year, and I've tasted a couple
of very good hot pepper brews.  Still haven't had the courage to go for
garlic beer yet, but I hear it is quite do-able.  I've also used a couple of
herbs--for example I once read somewhere that mugwort got its name because
it was a flavoring ingredient used in beer.  I don't know how true that is,
but I've used it several times, and though I can't say whether it added
anything significant, I do know that every time I've used it I've very much
enjoyed the beers I've produced.  That could be chalked up to the other
ingredients, though, and I don't have my log book handy at the moment.  I
know of at least one book on medicinal/herb brewing. Just one final
note--read up on herbs before you use them.  I later found out--not the hard
way, thankfully--that mugwort (Artemesia vulgaris) has been traditionally
used, among other things, to promote fertility in women!  Be careful!

Jason


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Re: Hops question
Ryan Smith wrote:
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Bocks are hopped to such a low level that the type of hops doesn't
really matter much.  You can use any noble variety at just enough to
keep the beer from being cloyingly sweet.

    ---------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Hops question
<snip>  You can use any noble variety at just enough to
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OK, Time for my 'stupid question of the week.'  What is meant by a 'noble
variety' when referring to hops?



Re: Hops question
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I'm not taking this from the official beer lover's dictionary or anything,
but my general understanding is that noble hops are the original varieties
of European hops used in beer for hundreds, if not thousands, of years.
Noble varieties include Hallertauer, Saaz, Tettnanger, Fuggle... and I'm
sure there's two or three more that I am forgetting.  They each have unique
flavors and aromas.  Hallertauer is more floral, Saaz is spicy, and Fuggle
is described as earthy.  Something like that anyway.

One very popular variety of hops used in the United States, Cascade, is NOT
considered a noble hop, but in my opinion it is also unique, and is more
citrusy/fruity.  Perhaps in a few hundred years, it too will be considered a
noble hop?

The point is, there are nearly 100 different varieties of hops, each with
their own unique characteristics, but they are pretty much all derived from
the original noble hops.  Some people think noble hops are the best and that
the best beers should only use noble hops.  Other people know they can make
quality beers without using noble hops.  It's all a matter of preference.

--
Dave
"Just a drink, a little drink, and I'll be feeling GOOooOOooOOooD!" --
Genesis, 1973-ish



Re: Hops question
"David M. Taylor" wrote:

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Close, but no cigar!  Fuggles isn't a noble.  Add in Spalt and you've
got the 4 noble hops.

    ----------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Hops question
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anything,
varieties
unique
Fuggle

Oops!  Well I should get points for trying anyway.  :)

Shouldn't Goldings be on the list, too?  Or maybe we'll need to wait a few
hundred years for that, too.  :)

--
Dave
"Just a drink, a little drink, and I'll be feeling GOOooOOooOOooD!" --
Genesis, 1973-ish



Re: Hops question
Thanks guys. Ill add that to my brewing notebook

Dan Rock



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