ice beer/eis bock

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I was thinking about using my chest freezer to brew a lager/bock, then drop
the temp and remove some water ice.  Anyone knwo in general how much I
should remove?
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Rex Merdinus

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Re: ice beer/eis bock
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I'm not sure i understand your maths. If your starting gravity is 1.012, how
can it get lower by removing water that is 1.000??? It should go up not
down.
--
Altair (:-o)>=® (supprimer/remove nospam@ pour répondre/to reply)
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Re: ice beer/eis bock
hi
i like you.
you really believe the commercials.

No if you put alcohol into water
you do not just freeeze the beer to get the water out.
because it won't freeze until it all freezes.

look close at the bottle of HI test
bets is it says beer no where and says liquor.
Malt liquor is still liquor.

in canada we call it a beer and a shot.
profoundly,

so a shot of rye, is gonna kill something off. maybe you.
some yeasts are higher performing TRY only in small batches, wine yeasts.
they rate 6 to 12 percent no problem.
experimenting is half the fun of home brewing.

best of luck though
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Re: ice beer/eis bock
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Have you tried it?  Actually the water will turn to slush before the
alcohol freezes.  You can remove the slush, thus removing the water and
strengthening the beer.  In Colonial times this was done to alcoholic
apple cider during the winter and was called "Apple Jack."


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In the US, Malt Liquor is basically just a higher alcohol beer,
as far as I know.  It is called "Malt Liquor" just as a tax,
labeling deal to separate it from "Beer" - and some states
even classify "Ale" as different from "Beer" - all based on
the alcohol level.


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