Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?

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On the 5th day in the primary ferementation had slowed to only one or
two bubbles per minute and I decided to put my "beer" into the
secondary.  There seem to be ALOT of issues and I am wondering if the
"beer" is salvageable.  First of all, due to all of the thermometers
in the house beginning at 70F, I have been unable to get an accurate
read on the temp since I cooled the wort and transfered it to the
primary.  Even then I guesstimated that it was around 50 - 55F.  At
any rate the original hydrometer readings before pitching was
SG - 1.0470
BALL - 12
AC - 6.1%

After being in the primary everyting dropped:
SG - 1.010
BALL - 3
AC - 1.5%

Also, I don't know what the beer SHOULD look like but it resembles
mud.  There was ALOT of sediment from the hops that I used.  I used
pellets with a "hop sock" in the boil but it seems that most of the
hops made it through the sock into the boil.

I have read some people talking about doing a second pitch.  Is that
feasable in my case?  Would that help?  Can anything help :-) ?????

Thanks in advance.

Re: Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?
You're fine. Your beer is essentially done fermenting. Your ABV is 4.9%
based on your gravity readings. Without knowing any else about your
beer, rule of thumb would put your final gravity at 11-12, so you
appear to be below that. You may drop another point or so before it's
time to bottle.

As far as the look of your beer. I would recommend on your next batch
get a mesh strainer/sieve and filter out your hops when you transfer
from the brewpot to fermenter. If you boiled those hops for the full 60
minutes, you should be fine. You got all your really going to get out
of them during the boil.

Just leave it in your secondary until everything settles out. Generally
it's recommended secondary should sit for 2 weeks. If it's really
mucky, you could let it sit for a week and transfer into a second
carboy and let it sit for another week. Only do this if you just can't
stand to leave it alone. It'll clear on it's own. If you don't have two
carboys, don't worry and just let it sit for 2 weeks. There's nothing
wrong with letting it sit longer too. If you've got a particularly cool
spot, the cool temps may help to precipitate the sediment faster.
Waiting is the hardest thing to brewing.


Re: Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?
On 14 Dec 2004 10:07:43 -0800, mike.flaminio@gmail.com wrote:

First, thank you for your response and helpfullness.  I do have a few
questions still, if you don't mind... some of these questions are
probable stupid but, remember that I am still a newbie at this.

Should there be ANY bubbling from the airlock while on the secondary?
At this point I seem to get one or two bubbles every 6-8 minutes.

If the fermentation is basicly done, what is the purpose of the
secondary?

Based off of your suggestions (and other responses), I should just
leave it alone in the secondary for a while and everything SHOULD work
itself out?

I do have a kegerator that is currently empty.  In regards to storing
it in cooler temps, would it do any good to keep it in there and, if
so, at what temps would you suggest.

Thank you again for your time and encouragement.

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Re: Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?
dantraveler wrote:

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Maybe...don't worry about it either way.  Bubbling is no indication of
anything but bubbling!  If you really want to know what's going on, take
a hydrometer reading.

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Clarifying and conditioning the beer.  A secondary is strictly
optional.  I usually do one, but I've made some fine beers by just
leaving it in primary for 3 weeks or so.  Don't worry about yeast
autolysis in that short time frame.

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Yes!  Time is your friend in brewing.  Work on the beer's schedule, not
the recipe's.

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There's nothing wrong with doing that, but it isn't strictly necessary.

    ----------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?
dantraveler wrote:

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Sounds like you've done everything right.  You might want to rack it to a
secondary fermentor if your worried about all that sediment, but otherwise
confirm that it's done fermenting, add the 3/4 cup of cornsugar per five
gallons and bottle.  You have a little ways to go if it's only the fifth
day, but beer has been known to not take very long at all to ferment.  It
doesn't sound completely done, furthermore there's stuff you can add to the
brew to get it to clear up too, although refrigeration has a tendency to do
that too.  They have various products you can add such as isingglass and
campden tablets, though I'm unsure of their efficacy.  I usually just let
it settle in the bottle.  I wouldn't worry about the hops, I've used them
before and they never left a rime on my mouth when drinking the beer.  I
would stop stirring it up and let the beer settle then bottle, but not too
early.
    -gcitagh

Re: Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?
I have moved it to my secondary (carboy) and as I did so tried to
strain the sediment through a wire strainer.  However, it did not seem
to do any good.  The strainer only caught a MINIMAL amount of the
sediment.

Thank you for your response and help.  I would appreciate your
opinions as I continue learning.

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Re: Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?
dantraveler wrote:
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Bad move with the strainer, I'm afraid.  You likely introduced a lot of
oxygen into the beer, which will make it prematurely stale.  The good
news is that it takes a while to set in, so if you drink it soon after
it's done, you'll probably be OK.  But don't do that again!

    --------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?
dantraveler wrote:
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When you siphoned the beer from the primary to the secondary, did you
accidentally stir up the sediment on the bottom of the primary
fermenter? Most of the "mud" you mentioned should have been left behind.
In any case, leaving it in secondary for a few days will allow the
sediment to settle back out, and you can siphon the clear beer into your
bottling bucket.

Karl S.
--
And whosoever will be chief among you, let him be your servant.
Matthew 20:27 KJV

Re: Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?
wrote

I do think that MOST of the sediment was left in the primary.
However, the color of the beer still looks like a nasty mud.

Thanks for you help. please feel free to pass on any and all
information you think I could use.



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Re: Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?
dantraveler@hotmail.com says...

Dude... RELAX!  You're falling into the "first time brewer trap" of over-
analyzing and worrying about things that will take care of themselves IF
YOU JUST QUIT MESSING WITH IT.  Sounds like you've done the right things
so far, so let nature take its course.

Most of any suspended solids will settle out in the secondary over the
next week or so.  I generally leave mine for at least 2 weeks before
bottling.  Yes, it will bubble a bit, but that should finish out,
as well.  You'll probably even get some futher fallout after botting, as
well.  So what?  It's all good stuff, and won't hurt you.

Next time, try some irish moss at the end of the boil.  Helps to promote
flocculation/knock-out of solids and proteins that end up suspended in
the brew.  Gives a clearer/cleaner look, but like I said, it's all good.

So again... RELAX!

bob p

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Re: Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?
I guess the fact that I want to understand what is happening is coming
across as worry.  I am RELAXED... My feeling is simply that IF it
doesn't work out this time I will try again.  In that regard, I am NOT
worrying.  I am simply trying to understand each step completely.  I
am sorry if my questions annoy but that is how I learn.  sorry to have
caused you any trouble...


On Thu, 16 Dec 2004 02:25:07 GMT, noone@nowhere.com

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Re: Newbie Question (continued) - subtitle: What DID I brew?
No trouble at all grasshopper...

A "bad" batch (one that doesn't EXACTLY hit the OG/FG marks, one that may
be a bit cloudy, one where a wild strain of yeast may have slipped in,
etc.) of homebrew is still better than the off the shelf stuff.  I've
never had a batch so badly ruined that it wasn't drinkable.  Some are
better than others, but their all good.  You just sounded like you were
obsessing a bit about the "nasty mud" stuff, and thinking that I was
annoyed sort of confirmed that.

Like I said, it's all good...

bob p

dantraveler@hotmail.com says...
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