Primary fermentation

Have a question or want to show off your project? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View


When doing primary fermentation, which do you prefer: air-lock or blow off
tube?

Re: Primary fermentation



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Neither.

I take the large o-ring out of the screw on lid and use that to secure a
piece of plastic wrap across the top of the fermenter. No hassles.
air-locks are a pain in the arse and a blow off tube is not much better.

--
Shill #2

24 beers in a carton. 24 hours in a day. Hmm...?

Re: Primary fermentation


On Sun, 22 Mar 2009 18:56:29 +0100, Government Shill #2 wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Or...
none at all, I use an open bucket as the yeast is a top fermenter it
makes its own lid, when over and gravity has stopped dropping (3-5 days)
it goes in a plastic barrel (king Keg) to condition/clear/mature then I
bottle - easy (well sometimes)

Re: Primary fermentation



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yeah, well, the plastic keeps bits out of it, but... why not?

Even easier is to put it into a post-mix soda keg and shove it into a
fridge. Drink in three days after it's carbonated from your CO2 bottle.

--
Shill #2

24 beers in a carton. 24 hours in a day. Hmm...?

Re: Primary fermentation



Quoted text here. Click to load it

I don't think I follow.

Re: Primary fermentation



Quoted text here. Click to load it


Like this
http://s462.photobucket.com/albums/qq341/govshill/?action=view&current=lookin.jpg
--
Shill #2

24 beers in a carton. 24 hours in a day. Hmm...?

Re: Primary fermentation



Quoted text here. Click to load it

So no C02 goes out?  Does this carbonate at the same time?

Re: Primary fermentation



Quoted text here. Click to load it

The CO2 escapes under the o-ring. It's not a perfect seal. The plastic is
just there to stop stuff falling in. The brew is protected from the
elements mostly by the layer of CO2 sitting on top of the brew. You can
also put *one* pin hole in the plastic if you want to. I used to do that,
but I don't bother anymore. No it doesn't carbonate it. I put the finished
brew into a 20 litre post-mix keg for that.

When it's going flat out the gas coming off makes the plastic bow up like
this:

http://s462.photobucket.com/albums/qq341/govshill/?action=view&current=P1010254.jpg

This is the beer fridge with kegs:

http://s462.photobucket.com/albums/qq341/govshill/?action=view&current=PC110103.jpg
The scale is under the keg so that I know when it's getting near empty.

--
Shill #2

Homer no function beer well without.
 Homer J. Simpson

Re: Primary fermentation


Quoted text here. Click to load it

If you do primary in a carboy a blow-off tube is a good idea.   There
are tales of airlocks getting jammed with hops and crud and enough
pressure building in the carboy to cause it burst or shoot a beer
geyser up to the ceiling.

Best case it makes a big mess (which I had happen once or twice)

Steve


Re: Primary fermentation


Quite interesting.  What's the highest gravity beer you've done with this
method?

Re: Primary fermentation



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Me?

My database says a 1050.

--
Shill #2

To alcohol! The cause of, and solution to, all of life's problems.
 Homer J. Simpson

Re: Primary fermentation



Quoted text here. Click to load it
That's quite high, what brew was it and what was the final sg?
Bertie


Re: Primary fermentation


wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Again the database tells me it was a Coopers Stout kit. Actually two
Coopers kits combined. Nothing else added. Final sg 1014. Volume 19 litres
(for putting into a post mix keg).

--
Shill #2

24 beers in a carton. 24 hours in a day. Hmm...?

Re: Primary fermentation



"Government Shill #2" < wrote in message
Quoted text here. Click to load it
About 5% that's ideal strength (for me). Over the years, I've tried a few
stout kits, but found that the mouthfeel was a bit thin compared to a good
pub draught. I hadn't thought of using 2 concentrates and holding the sugar.

I like Coopers standard larger, haven't tried their 'heretage' larger yet.
I'm trying Young's for the first time. I started a 'harvest pilsner' on
Thursday at 20C, still fairly active.



Re: Primary fermentation



Quoted text here. Click to load it

That's high?  The OG for the Irish Red I have in the primary 1.064.  That's
about average for me.

Re: Primary fermentation



:
Quoted text here. Click to load it


Do you get close to 1.000 FG on that one? Is Irish Red a recipe or a
concentrate kit?



Re: Primary fermentation


@mid.individual.net:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Recipe, but I do still use extract malt.

http://greycorner.com/~brainmuffin/deepredale.html

Re: Primary fermentation



"Bryon Lape"  wrote in message
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Thanks Bryon, saved to favs'.
Bertie

Re: Primary fermentation



"Government Shill #2"  wrote in message
Quoted text here. Click to load it



It's the same with breadmaking. There is the sourdough group, who make
artisan breads, using natural yeasts in the flour, but may take 3 or 4 days
to develop. The other group like myself, who use fresh or instant yeast
(wham bam) who are less patient. But each method has it's own unique taste.

Incidentally, ref your earlier thread reference to Coopers concentrates, did
you see their 'sparkling beer' kit? Have you tried it? I once tried making
Asti Spumanti, from an Italian white grape, but lost 90% of it, when the
bottles exploded. Fortunately it happened in the garage.





Re: Primary fermentation


wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it


No. I haven't yet. But I will.



Quoted text here. Click to load it


Sounds like you might have bottle a bit early. Before the fermentation was
complete. Either that or there was too much priming sugar in the bottles.
That doesn't happen with kegs. I LOVE kegs. :-)

--
Shill #2

Homer no function beer well without.
 Homer J. Simpson

Site Timeline