priming by early botteling

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is their a formula ie: bubbles per minute at a given temp for early
botteling? this would make the wort finsh fermenting in the bottles thus
carbonating without adding any priming sugars.



Re: priming by early botteling
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As far as I know, if you try bottling early, you are playing with fire.
Every time I've done it, way too much carbonation.  But if you find out any
kind of formula that actually works, I'd love to hear about it.

--
Dave
"Just a drink, a little drink, and I'll be feeling GOOooOOooOOooD!" --
Genesis, 1973-ish



Re: priming by early botteling
tommyboy wrote:
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And what's the purpose of "carbonating without adding any priming
sugars"?  They don't add any taste, they aren't expensive to use or hard
to get, so what would you be accomplishing?  If you're set on doing
this, though, use a hydrometer to know what's going on.  Counting
bubbles doesn't tell you anything but how many bubbles there are...you
have no way of knowing if the bubbles stop whether the beer is done or
if it's a stuck fermentation.

    ------------>Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: priming by early botteling
Den, the purpose would be that by not using sugar it would be like
Krausening the beer. this would improve the flavor and the richness of the
head (smaller bubbles). I suppose i could have saved some of the wort at the
beginning (that, i do have a  the formula for) or add 3/4 cup dry malt
instead of sugar but i was trying to find another method...just for the fun
of it.

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Re: priming by early botteling
I generally add malt instead of sugar.


Ray


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Re: priming by early botteling
Den, the purpose would be that by not using sugar it would be like
Krausening the beer. this would improve the flavor and the richness of the
head (smaller bubbles). I suppose i could have saved some of the wort at the
beginning (that, i do have a  the formula for) or add 3/4 cup dry malt
instead of sugar but i was trying to find another method...just for the fun
of it.


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Re: priming by early botteling
tommyboy wrote:
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Wel,, I'm afraid I'm going to have to disagree. AFAIAC, CO2 is CO2, no
matter where it comes from.  My tests have convinced me that there is no
difference between priming with gyle (what you refer to as krauesening),
corn sugar, cane sugar, honey, dry malt, or force carbonation.  If you
think you can detect a difference, I'm not going to tell you that you
can't, but I encourage you to do an experiment.  Prime severla bottles
using different methods.  Put them all away to age for 2-3 months.  Then
have someone else pour them for you, so that your preconceptions don't
interfere.  See if you can tell which is which, or even if you can tell
any difference between them.  I couldn't, nor could several other
experienced tasters.

    ---------------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: priming by early botteling
Commercial naturally conditioned ales are primed in this way. The beer is
chilled to slow fermentation to a near halt and to allow solids to
precipitate and then bottled with the remaining amount of residual sugar to
finish bottle fermentation. The ales are stored for a minimum of 3 weeks at
normal temperature (20C) before being released for consumption. OT. Lagers
with a slightly sweet taste use the same process only they go filtration and
sterilisation to kill yeasts and to prevent any bottle fermentation and are
then carbonated.
Steve W

--
"Lagers - just another name for industrial swill"
--


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Re: priming by early botteling
QuickDraw Steve wrote:
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Where did you get this info?  It's 180 degrees from what I'm aware of...
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Some lagers...but not by any means all.  How about dopplebock?  Dunkel?
Helles?

    -------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_dot_g_dot_conn_at_ci_dot_eugene_dot_or_dot_us

Re: priming by early botteling


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I have a book on commercial brewing. Unfortunately, I misplaced it when
moving house but I'll find it and give more info. However, it also makes
common sense. You can't really rack 30,000 litres of beer and prime 80,000
bottles. Even bulk priming is out of the question as it involves racking and
stirring in sugar.

Steve W.



Re: priming by early botteling
QuickDraw Steve wrote:

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Well that's certainly at odds with every commercial brewer I know of who
bottle conditions thier beer.  Trying to prime by guageing when
fermentation is almost complete, without adding additional sugar, is a
real crapshoot.  Every commercial brewer I know of who bottle conditions
beer adds priming sugar.

    ---------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_dot_g_dot_conn_at_ci_dot_eugene_dot_or_dot_us

Re: priming by early botteling
Safety glasses and a mop wouldn't be a bad idea.

Avery
Brew on brother!

Re: priming by early botteling
tommyboy wrote:

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COOoould just use those nitrogen pellets, after you find a way to fit one
into a bottle, maybe talk to the McKenzie brothers on that one.


Re: priming by early botteling
Should I ask Doug or Bob?  "Take off you hoser ...... and a beer" :-)


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