Some more questions

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Okay, reading through Palmer's book (How to Brew) I think that I am
going into information overload.

I will shortly be visiting a shop while visiting my In-Laws so plan to
buy all my equipment then (within the next 7 days). From all the
Beginner Equipment Kits I have seen, it appears that the Fermenting Bin
has a solid lid however, in the guide, it mentions using an airlock. Is
this a neccessary piece of equipment? Is there an alternative?

Also, there is talk of needing to cool down the wort(?) as quickly as
possible. To begin with I will be using a malted extract so won't be
boiling everything at the same time (due to not having a big enough
container to do this). Will adding cold water, bringing up the volume
to the desired amount be sufficient in cooling the mixture down?

I will eventually buy a mashing bin/boiler and a cooler, but to begin
with I am looking for the minimum required kit to start me off.

Jeez, when I first decided that this was something I wanted to do, I
didn't realise just how much there was to look into :D


Re: Some more questions


PieOPah wrote:
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You need to have some way to lket the CO2 produced by fermentation
escape.  The airlock is a way to accomplish that.  It lets CO2 escape
via a kind of one way valve that doesn't allow air to enter your
fermenter.  Any method that accomplishes that will work.

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Cooling as quickly as possible is one of the keys to quality beer.
After the boil, put your kettle in a sink fuill of ice water to cool it
down.  AFter it'ss down in the 80ish area (F, sorry, I'm C impaired!),
add the rest of your water

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No problem, that's what almost all of us did.

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It depends on if you want to make beer, or if you want to make GOOD
beer!  LIke any hobby, the more info you have, the better off you are.

    ---------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Some more questions


Again thank you for you advice Denny :D

I am surprised that none of the beginners kits mention anything about
an airlock if this is a neccessary piece of equipment. I may look into
buying everything seperately (depending on the cost) so I know I have
everything I need!


Re: Some more questions


PieOPah wrote:
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I'd assume, judging by the equipment you mention, that you're in the UK
or Audtralia.  I'm not familiar with the Fermenting Bin you mention and
that might have a similar mechanisn built into it.  Here, many people
use plastic buckets to ferment in and there's a hole in the bucket lid
to allow an airlock to be attached.

    -------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Some more questions


Yeah I'm in the UK. The Fermenting Bins look like Plastic Buckets, but
from what I have seen, the lids don't appear to have any holes in them
(I am only looking at pictures, so I may be wrong!

When I am at the Brew Shop later this week, I will be able to have a
look at what is in stock (something I would prefer to do than buying
online). If I am left with no real alternative, then I will be buying
online.

If absolutely neccessary, I assume that it would be safe to put a hole
in the lid if one doesn't already exisit!


Re: Some more questions


1111700656.025457.286010@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
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Some shops sell a plastic bucket with a regular lid (no hole) and sell lid
with hole separately. If you make your own hole, make sure it's really round
and that the rubber bung (is that the good word?) will seal the hole
correctly. If there is a leak you will not be able to see when the
fermentation start.

Also, some people (i'm one of them) don't use an airtitgh lid for primary. I
just put the lid on top of the bucket (not sealed) to make sure that no dust
fall in the beer, i put a clean dish towel over the lid for safe measure. So
far i hadn't an infected batch (ok, i didn't do much batchs yet but so far
so good). Don't forget that lots of brewery do open fermentation for
primary.

You may think that you have an information overload but it's better to know
more before starting and get the stuff you need than being in the middle of
your first batch and realising that you just forgot something important. The
more you plan ahead, the easyer it will be when you actually do your first
batch. Also try to rehearst you brewing session in advance. That may sound
stupid but when you are in the action and your wort start boiling and you
have some sanitized equipement in your hand and the doorbell ring, it's then
you realise that you didn't prepare a sanitized place to put your sanitized
stuff and you have to start the cleaning over...

Making beer is not that complicated, it's a bit like music, the more you
know the easyer it is to pass over the details and really apreciate the
beauty of it.
--
Altair (:-o)>=® (supprimer/remove nospam@ pour répondre/to reply)
Définition :
Cellulaire : Appareil qui permet aux gens de croire qu'ils communiquent
puisqu'ils parlent.
Cellphone: Device that allow people to think they are communicating because
they are talking.



Re: Some more questions


On Thu, 24 Mar 2005 22:15:59 -0500, "Altair"


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The "bung" I had with my plastic fermenter appeared to be an ordinary
rubber grommet (same type used in electronics to keep wires from
chaffing where they pass through holes in the chassis)

Re: Some more questions


PieOPah wrote:

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You bet...that's exactly what I did.

    ---------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Some more questions


Am I to understand that you cool the wort, then add the rest of the
water? I have only made a few batches so far but have kept the rest of
the water in  the fridge and added it to the wort. I still end up with a
mix that is still to hot and needs to cool further.

Does the wort all pour out of the pot when it is cooled off?

I may try that next time.

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Re: Some more questions


Bchbound wrote:
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Yes, it does.  I prefer getting the wort unber 80F before I move it.
The warmer it is, the more easily it can pick up O2 which can lead to
stale off flavors.

    --------->Denny

--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Some more questions



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Who cares if the wort picks up oxygen when you transfer it from the
kettle to the primary fermentation vessel?  You NEED to get oxygen
into it at this point.  Without it the yeast can't reproduce
appropriately, and you'll end up with a lot less yeast cells trying to
do the fermentation - meaning it will either take longer to ferment,
or, more likely, that you will end up with a very sweet, low alcohol
beer.

You don't worry about oxygen causing your beer to degrade until AFTER
it comes out of the primary fermenter.


Re: Some more questions


NobodyMan wrote:
     --------->Denny
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Close, but no cigar..you don't want to get O2 in your beer until it's
below about 85F.  THEN you need a lot of O2 in order for the yeast to
synthesize the sterols they need for cell wall building.

    ------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Some more questions



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 I.E., even a drop of nonsterile water can contaminate.  If your
procedure will be to cool the wort down in a sink of cold water, then
to pour the wort into the primary containing the rest of your water,
it is easy to overlook the sink water dripping from the kettle.  To
address this, before pouring the cooled wort into your primary, set
the kettle down on a towel, making sure the exterior is dry, then pour
it into primary.  Of course, the water in your primary has first been
sterilised by boiling and cooling, right? Just hate to see an aspiring
brewer ruin his first batch by a moment of carelessness.  Good luck.

Re: Some more questions


msclvr wrote:

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It depends totally on your own water.  I've often used tap water to top
off a batch without any problems at all.

    ---------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Some more questions



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Right, but I was thinking of water that sits in the sink, being used
to cool the kettle of wort.  This water may be contaminated, even if
the water straight from the tap is fine.  Just a precaution I once
observed before I got into full-wort boils and immersion chillers.

Re: Some more questions


That was something I had never thought of. If I am cooling down my wort
in the sink, then unless I have previously cleaned the sink, then this
could potentially ruin a batch! Coming directly from the tap there is
less chance that there is a problem with the water....

Thanks for pointing that out to me :D


Re: Some more questions


PieOPah wrote:
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I guess this didn't occur to me since I always clean the sink before
doing this.  :)

    -------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Some more questions


shaking it up to get it into the sink is also not a really fantastic thing.
agitate, only until you add the yeast

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Re: Some more questions


I use a 7 gallon plastic bucket for my primary and seal it with a sterile
plastic garbage bag.  The bag is secured with a large rubber band.  It makes
a very good air tight seal and you can tell when your wort is active because
the bag domes up.  It is ready to transfer to the secondary when the bag
begins to fall.  I place the plastic bag over the bucket so that it fits
like a drum head.  In other words I don't use the bag as a bag but more as a
piece of material that I can stretch flat over the top of the bucket.  I
just happen to use plastic bags because they are handy.  Otherwise I would
use a sheet of plastic.

Doug


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Re: Some more questions


agree the comments below
except
the bucket and the garbage bag cover must both be food grade quality.
avoid PVC compounds as they contain trace amounts of lead, which could
transfer to your beer.
lead is a really bad thing to suck on.

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