to avoid oxidation in 2ndry?

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After 2+ weeks in primary and no change hydrometer reading 2 consecutive
days , in food grade primary  (air tight lid) plans are to transfer by
siphon the "brew" to glass carboy 2ndy for 2+ weeks add't l settling/aging
before charging and bottling.

Question???
1) To avoid oxidizing brew should opening of sealed lid of primary be
avoided?
2) I am considering removal of airlock, insertion of siphon through same
grommet in lid and transfer to 2ndry to avoid oxidizing brew.  Comment?
3) Also, as an alternative, considering transfer of brew from primary to
2ndry by attachment sanitized tube to sanitized spigot into sanitized
sugar-charged glass carboy.  Comments?

Thanks



Re: to avoid oxidation in 2ndry?


Scott Streiker wrote:
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Relax, etc., etc.
First off, why are you adding sugar to the secondary?
You don't want to add the sugar (unless you are trying to up the
alcohol) until you are ready to bottle/keg.
If you add the sugar now, it will all ferment out and you will have to
add more at bottling time.
Second, opening your lid will not have an adverse reaction to your beer.
The layer of CO2 above the beer will protect it.
Same goes for removing the airlock.
As long as you transfer "quietly" (no splashing), there will be no problem.
If your primary is a bottling bucket (pail with a spigot), you can hook
a tube to the spigot and transfer (rack) that way.
Just remember to try not to splash the beer around too much.
Cheers,

--
Michael Herrenbruck
Dragon Tail Ale
Drunken Bee Mead

Re: to avoid oxidation in 2ndry?


To clear any confusion.. edit below...
After 2 + weeks in primary transfer and settle/rest in 2ndry THEN re-rack to
carboy with charging sugars before charging/

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Re: to avoid oxidation in 2ndry?


Scott Streiker wrote:
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Your secondary IS glass, right?

--
Michael Herrenbruck
Dragon Tail Ale
Drunken Bee Mead

Re: to avoid oxidation in 2ndry?



Some of my brews only fermet for a little over 2 weeks and then they are
ready
to go to the bottle.  MMMMM...... Brings up a question I need to
post.  I will
have to do that in a bit.
Anyways, what I was going to make a point of, is if the gravity is
unchanging
for a few days would it not be about ready to go straight to
a bottle and forget
the secondary?  I have done that several times and
the final product has always
turned out just fine.


--
dlihcsnatas

nothing like kicking back in a lawn
chair on a beautiful morning with a
mug of dark ale to start the day out right.
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Re: to avoid oxidation in 2ndry?


RE: feedback that does not utilize 2ndry...
Is not the promary point of racking to secondary to provide add'l aging and
clarification? Secondarily, is there not also add'l conversion by yeast?

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Re: to avoid oxidation in 2ndry?


dlihcsnatas wrote on 10/27/2006 9:41 PM:
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The secondary is for clarity and aging. You would notice a big
difference in those beers if you age them an additional 4-6 weeks. I
always found that the beers I bottled quickly always tasted better right
about the time they are all gone. That is, after they aged.

Jim

Re: to avoid oxidation in 2ndry?



Jim;12030 Wrote:
>
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You know I am a bit of a procrastinator on most everything but wanting
to try my
latest creation.  I think that you have shown me the light on
this Jim.  Reason
is that I have had a bottle or two that had gotten
tucked away in the back only
to be found several months down the road
after all the others from that batch
had already been drank and found
they seemed much better than I remembered them
being.  While the ones I
let age for only 2 months in the bottle was good the
ones that had aged
5 or 6 did seem better.
You have made me think that on the batches I have going now that I
better go for
secondary, but then there is that part of me that worries
about getting too much
splash or worse some outside organism in it and
the whole thing goes belly up.
I have been checking out conicals and
that is how I ended up on this site, but
when I finally get my hands on
one of these conicals I will be doing the
secondary.


--
dlihcsnatas

nothing like kicking back in a lawn chair on a
beautiful morning with a
mug of dark ale to start the day out right.
------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Re: to avoid oxidation in 2ndry?



The benefits of the secondary easily outweigh the risk especially if you
are
even moderately careful.


--
BierNewbie
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Re: to avoid oxidation in 2ndry?



Scott Streiker;12014 Wrote:
> After 2+ weeks in primary and no change
hydrometer reading 2
> consecutive
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This ain't wine my friend.  As long as you don't have the siphon tube
splashing
all about you are fine.  I would like to know what you are
making, and would
tell you you really should not go over 2 weeks in a
primary because you will get
some funky "yeast bite" from autolysis
(the dead yeast breaking down)  in the
secondary you can be good for up
to six or so but I have never secondaried for
more that 2 weeks, than
again I only make ale thus far, BUT, winters comin' and
I got a nice 40
degree root cellar!!


--
MadMaltMasher
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Re: to avoid oxidation in 2ndry?


Thanks to all the respondents who have added to my brewing education.   I am
enjoying brewing with an inquiring mind.
Attitude  there is always time to learn a lot while "relaxing...with another
homebrew."

First brew happening is a look-alike Listermanns kit  "Anchor Steam"
containing both malt extract and grains.  Yeast is a bottom fermenting type
for Ale.
Hops are Nothern.

The replies in this newsgroup and others re: brewing display a marked
dissimiliarity of experiences, advise.  Even the "all about" brew books by
various authors write dissimiliar explanations and methodologies.
As a result of theses dissimiliar "cults"
I'll continue this brew as follows:
1) Two weeks+ in Primary ( and then after hydrometer reading is stable two
consequitive days...
2) ...Transfer by slow sanbtized sipon, avoiding disturbing turb/sediment,
to sanitized glass carboy...
clarification and aging... Record F.G. and other pertinent observations
4) Transfer again to bottling bucket containing dissolved charging sugars
and from there immediately into sanitized bottles.  5) Test and record taste
and sensiometric, rheologic, morphological, high resolution scanning
electron photomicrographs, tongue scrapings, etc.

Yes, Virginia, there is a Santa Claus opps, I mean a "scientific appraoch"
complete with note and observations...This brew has been named KBOO GUD BRUE
to honor the early observations of the ill-fated attemp to establish a
colony on Roanoke Island off South Carolina  as described in the writing by
Thomas Hariot "Narrative of the First English Plantation"in which he stated
early brewing developments.
I expect to report results in 4+ weeks on this forum of insights/experiences
from initial  attempt to find a "best approach synthesized from various
online and print authors"

Oh yeah, for those who are encouraging with thier info and input  Thanks
For those who are casual and find 2ndry and re-racking and other tasks, as
they write, "anal".. Thanks for you thoughts.
Final observation, at this time, sip a beer and realize that "tongue in
cheek" exposes the largest surface area for the greatest number of taste
buds!

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