when to rack to secondary (by eyeball...)

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My typical brewing schedule is to rack to primary, wait about a week and
then rack to secondary for another week.

However every time I rack to secondary it appears that nothing ever happens
in the airlock. Should I rack to secondary earlier in the process to
jumpstart a second fermentation process?



Re: when to rack to secondary (by eyeball...)



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What you do is fine, and probably what most do.  IMHO, the secondary is
more for clearing and aging than fermentation.  In fact, for most ales,
I don't even do a secondary anymore... just primary longer for the
clearing and aging, then bottle.  I've seen no difference in quality.

Derric

Re: when to rack to secondary (by eyeball...)



I agree...pretty much wait until primary is done and yeast has
fallen...then
decant off the yeast and you can leave it in secondary
for a while.


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harsley
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Re: when to rack to secondary (by eyeball...)



Fermentation *should* be done before racking to secondary. This is the
time the
beer starts to clear.


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Re: when to rack to secondary (by eyeball...)


If all you had to go by was airlock activity, how would you define a
complete fermentation? Right now I get a CO2 bubble every 12-13 seconds, a
considerable slowdown since two days ago, but fermenting nonetheless.

What I want to avoid is keeping the beer on the trub for too long and
getting off flavors. I also want to make sure that the remaining yeast is
active enough to give me carbonation during bottle conditioning

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Re: when to rack to secondary (by eyeball...)


At a rate of 12 - 13 seconds between co2 bubbles, I'd say it's safe to rack
to secondary.

Contrary to what others have said in this thread, I have always put my beer
in secondary for the past 19 years.

Leaving beer on the yeast in primary too long can give you off flavors, do
to the fact that the yeast that is dead (not all of it is dead but some of
it dies and some goes dormant) starts to decay.


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Re: when to rack to secondary (by eyeball...)



It takes a few weeks before autolysis.  An average rule of thumb for
ales is
7-10 days in primary or until fermentation slows to 1 bubble at
a minute+.
Which ever comes last.

Wild


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wild

::It is my design to die in the brew-house; let ale be placed
to my
mouth when I am expiring, that when the choirs of angels come, they may
say, \"Be God propitious to this drinker.\" -- Saint Columbanus, A.D.
612::
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Re: when to rack to secondary (by eyeball...)


That all depends on how warm your fermentation is... but hell, I know
nothing after 19 years of homebrewing.
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Re: when to rack to secondary (by eyeball...)


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I drop mine into the secondary as soon as the primary fermentation
starts to slow down and there isn't a thick 'head' of yeast on the
beer. This is usually about 4 days after I started the brew.


Re: when to rack to secondary (by eyeball...)


That is pretty much what I did.

I bottle tomorrow. When I tasted it last week it was already showing promise
so I think I'm in good shape.

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Re: when to rack to secondary (by eyeball...)



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You don't own an hydrometer?

All bubbles in an airlock indicate is that the secondary is
sealed.  

The 'secondary fermentation process' is for 'conditioning'.
Minimal fermentation should be taking place in the secondary.
See: http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter8-2-3.html
Dick

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