wort chiller

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Just thought that I would say.  I have been homebrewing for a while now and
finally built a wort chiller.  Quite easy, and purchasing everything new
from Lowe's only cost about 25 bucks, using my exsisting water hose.

I normally put the lid on the brew pot and stick it in a keg bucket with
cold water to cool it.  Takes 1 to 1-1/2 hours to cool my wort.  With my new
wort chiller, took less than 10 minutes and I was able to pitch yeast, thus
being done.  I dont think it makes a difference in how fast you cool it, if
it is covered, but my yeast became active really quick.  Less than 24 hours,
and is active as hell.  Not the first time doing this batch, same recipe,
yeast, ect.

Just thought I would share,
Joe



Re: wort chiller
just started using one (wort chiller) myself, and wonder how i got along
without it before.

bob p

--
Why do you drive on the parkway and park on the driveway?
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and
new
thus
if
hours,



Re: wort chiller
Just picked up the hardware from Home Depot to put one together. They had
either 20 foot or 60 foot rolls of 3/8" copper tube in rolls. I opted for
the 20 footer.

How do you get the bottom end of the worm to come up through the middle of
the coil? Make a hole in the paint can mandrel or use a short chunk of 8"
PVC pipe to wrap the copper around?


I plan on clamping the input/output ends together (allowing for the
fittings) to reduce stress on the coil.

John

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recipe,



Re: wort chiller
I used a bucket to make the coils, then I rolled the bottom a bit on the
counter, then manipulated by hand.  It came out good, not kinked or
anything.

Joe

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now
new
with
my
it,



Re: wort chiller
Hello,
You can also buy, at the hardware store, pipe-benders of various sorts for
bending tubes of different thicknesses and materials.  Or borrow one from a
plumber friend for a bottle or two of homebrew :-)

-- Bill
P.S. I used a cornelius keg as a mandrell for my wort chiller.   Worked
great!


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had
for
of
8"
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along
With
yeast,
24



Re: wort chiller
"Joe" wrote:

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Actually, it can make a big difference.  My first beers (all extract-based)
developed a distasteful creamed corn aroma, usually shortly after bottling.
I'm convinced that this is because of the relatively long cooling time (I'd
let the beer slowly cool from about 85-70 degrees on its own).  After I
started chilling my wort (first in a sink of cold water with some stirring,
then with an immersion chiller) the aroma never showed its face again.

Viva la Chiller!

Brina



Re: wort chiller

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Hi

Quote from the course notes for the "Brewlab Advanced Home-Brewing
Technology" Course I went on last year here in the UK:-

"Cooling should be carried out as rapidly as possible to accentuate
the cold break of protein precipitation.  This is best done using a
heat exchanger or a length of copper coil immersed in the wort.
Relevant points to consider are;
Ensure all cooling vessels and apparatus are clean and sterile.
Arrange cooling system to cool to 20 degrees C in less than 30 mins".


Also a quote from the book "Home Brewing" by Graham Wheeler:-

"Force cooling of the wort after boiling has several benefits.  The
most important of these is that the wort is exposed to airborne
contamination for a shorter period of time and is cooled below the
optimum temperature for bacterial growth fairly quickly.  Another
benefit is that rapid cooling forces more potential haze forming
protein to be precipitated out of solution.........an important point
to bear in mind is that fast cooling the wort by topping up with water
will NOT cause the trub to precipitate; in fact the opposite is true,
the increased volume will encourage the protein to remain in solution.

Regards

KGB


Re: wort chiller
A short note on wort chillers.  If you are using a copper coil wort chiller,
moving it up and down very gently as it is cooling your wort will aid
greatly in the amount of time it takes to cool the wort.  The reason being
is that if it just sits there the liquid immediately surrounding the copper
coil will cool down but then begins to act as an insulator and slows the
cooling process.  If you move the coil up and down very gently you renew the
liquid in contact  the coil and allow for an accelerated cooling process.

Doug



Re: wort chiller
cc0112453 wrote:
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I was just shown this last weekend at an all-grain brewing seminar at
the local microbrewery.  Another great idea that had never occured to me
was to sanitize the chiller by simply letting it sit in the boiling wort
for the last 20 minutes of the boil.  I had always wondered how you got
something with so much surface area sanitized enough.

Denny


Re: wort chiller
Got a 2lb plastic pail from the local supermarket bakery. It is 8" diameter
at the base. I plan on cutting a hole in the centre and bending the pipe to
go up through the hole then winding the 3/8" pipe around the outside of the
pail using it as a mandrel. I figure it will take 41' of pipe for the coil
plus the in/out connections. This can be expanded to the depth of the
boiling pot. I am thinking of weaving nylon cable ties in and out of the
coil turns to hold the coil mechanically stable.

John


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chiller,
being
copper
the
process.



Re: wort chiller
Those cable ties sound like a cleaning nightmare to me. Be careful
with your sanitation.


Mike


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Re: wort chiller
might try copper wire instead.  10-12 gauge prob'ly would do it.  also,
someone else mentioned it, but i sanitize my chiller by putting it in the
boiling wort about 20 minutes before knockout, so i don't have to hassle
with all the nooks and crannys.

bp

--
Why do you drive on the parkway and park on the driveway?
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diameter
to
the
coil
the
renew
me
wort



Re: wort chiller
I thought about sanitation this morning, way too many nooks and crannies to
harbour wild life and off flavours.

Copper wire is mentioned in the following post, not a bad idea.

John

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diameter
to
the
coil
the
renew
me
wort



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