Yeast re-use

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Ok, here is my question. I had done some research previously on reusing or
saving the used yeast that settles at the bottom of the bottle after you
siphen the good stuff into secondary, I was told not to do it but recently I
had some good luck with it. About a month ago this is what I did. I used the
leftover stuff to brew my new batch of apple-honey mead. If I put my ear to
the mouth of the bottle it sounds like a small war is going on in there. The
question is. Is this going to be a healthy batch? Is it supposed to be
bubbling this damn fast for this long? If anyone has done this before please
let me know how your batch turned out because if this works out the way I
think it will I may not have to buy yeast anymore. The batch has already
been transfered into the airlock secondaries and is sitting. No bubbling is
visual but the pressure builds daily so I have to burp it. The color is
perfect amber and smells wonderfull. I tested its alcohol content to be
18-20 proof with a slight variation in each bottle. I drank 6 mugs and got
dead drunk, but I slept like a baby. Below is my recipe for reference. I
highly recommend this for anyone who likes the taste of honey apple. I used
RedStar wine yeast to make this batch and the leftovers are still alive
because I am now working on my third batch from the dead yeast and this
batch is going nuts. The meade is bubbling very rappidly.

5 pounds honey
4 Gallons apple juice from concentrate with 1 cup disolved table sugar
5 crushed apples then baked to caramalize, these are Fuji apples (the yummy
kind)
reused 1/4 of sediment dead yeast cells

The process was like this

I boiled to disinfect then disolved contents into pan then transfered into
my 5 gallon carboy. I will prime with 1 pound of honey after 3 weeks and let
it bubble away for another 2 weeks before air locking in my secondaries.
Total process is about 45 days before bottling. I will drink it right out of
the carboy though.

My last batch turned out a yellow amber color. It was very smooth and sweet.
This batch was about 18 proof.




Re: Yeast re-use


On Sat, 02 Apr 2005 18:57:01 GMT, "none"

I haven't had problems when reusing old yeast.  Putting fresh wort on
the remanent of the secondary yeast works for me.  Reusing the primary
yeast might be better - fewer mutations.  Many batches are better for
it - reused up to three times.

I've always had vigorous fermentation when reusing yeast - it is
always faster than any yeast starter I've made.

If it works for me - screw the experts - keep doing it (my motto).

I have to figure that all yeast in the world are just the descendants
of wild yeast.  Some strains lend their characteristics to different
locales and brews.  Some old breweries, that made great beer for
hundreds of years, never cultured or isolated their strains - just
kept the yeast going with fresh ingredients.

Did the pharaoh's brewers have clean rooms, or PhD microbiologists?  I
wonder how good their beer was - but they kept at it so it must have
pleased them - or the tap water was too terrible for words.

Healthy yeast is probably more desirable than a particular yeast when
all is said and done (and drunk).

Your recipe sounds good.  I'm not a meade fan, but appreciate the art,
and recognize the effort you bring to the craft

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Re: Yeast re-use


i make sour dough bread which is basically 7 year old yeast.
when you find a great yeast sure keep it going.
personally i think making beer and making sour dough bread go hand in hand.
the chance of cross contamination is incredibly high, but, no buddy
complains of a slice of bread and a beer.

i also heard that
smiling naked men are best stored in dark bedrooms.
but i would not know.

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Re: Yeast re-use


I have only recently been reading this group, newspapers are still my
preferred reading, but home brewing is my hobby,, and someone introduce me
to this newsgroup several months ago,, though I would give my two cents
worth!  Hope my experience with reusing yeast is of interest

I can agree, using the yeast cake for the next batch is possible, though it
does require more work than chucking in a new pack of dried yeast. I have
been making a Chimay clone and am now on my third consecutive batch, with
the original yeast,, started with a wyeast 1214 Belgian Ale Yeast, combined
with a yeast culture from the sediment of a Chimay Grande Reserve bottle.  I
started this original batch largely due to cost,, the wyeast cost over $11.
cad up here in the north,, and the chimay itself was $10 as well,, but
definately worth the price to me!

The first batch started slooooow,, and took an extended time to finish,
about 45 days,, in bottle fermentation also proceeded slowly,, I sampled a
bottle after three weeks and it was flatter than a pankake,, another two
weeks and it was beautiful. This is not too long to wait, and it was in the
middle of our winter, and quite cold in the house. I kept a portion of the
yeast from the primary and put up the second batch about two weeks after the
primary finished,, all grain supplemented with unpasturized local honey,,
and the fememetation from this mix, well,, it was surprisingly quick, and
this from a .090 gravity brew!    The benefit,,,,, it fermented and matured
quicker than the first batch, and was fully drinkable in just two months!

I have made Chimay clones from time to time over the past 20 years, and
though I love the speed of the ferment,, I will wait to see if the resulting
beer has the storage quaility remains the same as my past batches,, I have a
few bottles from over 4 years ago that I go to when the mood strikes,, and
like fine wine . it seems to improve with age.  I suspect it will be the
same with these batches.

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Re: Yeast re-use


When you store the yeast, how long is it good for and how do you store
it?


Re: Yeast re-use


wrote:

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I have no problem putting some of the dregs from the fermenter in a
sanitized beer bottle capping it and leaving it in the refer for
months (never went over four months and used a starter but there was
no problem, I think 6+ months might be OK).  Easy to do when racking -
just pinch the hose when the siphon starts sucking drub, and transfer
the end of the tube to a clean bottle.

Ideally the yeast should be fed to keep them active, but they last
cold in the dormant stage very well.  

It is easy to just take a bottle of homebrew that is leftover from a
year ago (assuming you have one) pour the beer off,  add some
water,shake it up to get the yeast in suspension, then pour that into
a starter solution.

Do it a day in advance to check the viability and get the yeast
multiplying.

http://groups.msn.com/NorthTexasHomeBrewAssociationHomePage/freezingyeast.msnw
Has an article on freezing yeast for use years later.


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Re: Yeast re-use


Hi,
I dont mean to be negative but why reuse yeast?
yeast is so cheap and there are so many kinds available depending on brew
type you want.


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Re: Yeast re-use


On Thu, 28 Apr 2005 19:17:13 +1200, "Hataitai"

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Yeast can run $10 a shot or, more commonly, $5 for most of the liquid
yeast.  Or you may just have an exceptional beer that you want to
duplicate.  Liquid yeasts tend to be more variable in character so you
may want to hang onto one.  You may want to combine two different
yeasts . . . I tend to get faster fermentation when reusing a shot of
yeast.

There are lots of reasons besides cost, but cost may be one
consideration.



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Re: Yeast re-use


Hataitai wrote:
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I agree with you in reference to dry yeast.  Liquid yeast is more
expensive, though, especially by the time you make a starter for it.
Saving a reusing yeast provides you with a higher cell count and saves
you money.  In addition, there are some hard to get strains I like to
use and it's much easier to save and reuse them instead of culturing
them from a slant every time.

    ---------->Denny
--
Life begins at 60 - 1.060, that is.

Reply to denny_at_projectoneaudio_dot_com

Re: Yeast re-use


yes yeast is so cheap
now lets do an experiment
go the brew shop and get the most expensive yeast and the cheapest.
go home and make one loaf of bread wih one package, and make another with
the second package.
cheap is a relative term
ya get what ya pay for
ALWAYS
well reuse.
life exists on this planet. but not even yeast can survive being on mars.
if i spend 17 dollars for a yeast, reusing it is normal.
75 cent yeast, is no big deal. so is the brew, no big deal.
that 17 dollar yeast will do things
comparing a lambourginie to a golf cart is not my idea, but it is the stated
question.
REUSE good stuff if ya got it.
dug88
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Re: Yeast re-use


the oldest recipe on this planet is
how to make beer,

well 4 thousand years ago they did not understand yeast.
the story of it is actually fascinating.

yeasts have been stored for hundreds of years, not as a package but, as a
working viable culture. in bread making sour dough bread making is (well in
my case) an 8 year old yeast.

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