First Scotch recommendation

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A young lady of my acquaintance has no experience with Scotch whisky.
She lives too far away for me to let her taste my offerings.
I'm thinking of suggesting The Glenlivet 12 yo as a starter. Thoughts?

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
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Re: First Scotch recommendation


On 29 Jan 2006 10:04:36 GMT, n_cramerSPAM@pacbell.net replied:
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Glenlivet can be a turn-off because it's so... tasteless. It's a
good mixer and fills a need but not for getting someone interested
in the diversity of sms.

I'd recommend something sherry-based; Cardhu, Balvenie (pick a
style), Trader Joe's house brand...

By getting her to train herself, she can move to stronger, more
smoky or peaty, sms.

The Ranger

Re: First Scotch recommendation



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Depends... If she has got taste buds she would probably better appreciate
the finer nuances of the more cultivated Speysides.
It's the same with food, some people will pour ketchup, chilly sauce or
worcester on anything before they eat..., others are more fine-tuned.
:-)
Anders



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Ouch! I know these things are a matter of personal taste but I would never
describe Glenlivet as a mixer and would never use it as such. But, as they
say, each to his/her own.

It might be an idea if the OP were to tell us what drinks he knows that the
young lady is particularly fond of.



Re: First Scotch recommendation


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Good question. I'll ask her and get back to the group.

Thanks guys.

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
their families:
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Re: First Scotch recommendation


 n_cramerSPAM@pacbell.net wrote:

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If it's not too late yet, get an idea of what her tastes in food are. If
she has an adventurous palate -- likes spicy foods, is willing to try
new ethnic dishes, etc. -- you could try something like Lagavulin or
Talisker on her.

If she shies away from strange foods and exotic tastes, try something
safer, like a Highland or a Speyside.

Highland Park might actually be a nice test. If she remarks on how
smooth and heathery it is, stay with the highlands. If she notices and
likes the mild smoke and peat, something more assertive might be next.

bill

Re: First Scotch recommendation


n_cramerSPAM@pacbell.net wrote:
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To which the young lady responded:

"I like beer, but not crappy American beer. When it comes to mixed
drinks, I like cuba libres and southern comfort and sour mix. I like
margaritas and daiquiris, too, but those almost don't count as alcohol."

Based on that, I may have to offer her a Hot Toddy!

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
their families:
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Re: First Scotch recommendation


 n_cramerSPAM@pacbell.net wrote:

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The beer remark is telling. She has some taste. I'd start her with a
Highland Park 12. It's a crossroads between several major malt styles,
and a class act.

Remind her to drink it neat or with a tiny bit of spring water if
necessary. Listen closely to what she says about it to determine your
next recommendation.

bill

Re: First Scotch recommendation


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Did she mean that she dislikes "those American beers which are crappy", or that
she dislikes "all American beer, which is crappy"?

-- Larry


Re: First Scotch recommendation


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I would guess the former. She's prolly unaware of how many crappy furrin
beers there are.

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
their families:
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Re: First Scotch recommendation



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I've heard that there are good American beers from small breweries, even
very good ones if you know your beers, but when the talk is about the big
brands, Budweiser et al., my understanding is that they hardly taste of beer
at all...
Anders



Re: First Scotch recommendation


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Sad, but true. Any good breweries, bigger than a micro, get bought up by a
big one and their quality generally suffers. The original Budweiser, from
Checkoslovakia, is supposed to be very good. It has to be sold under a
different name here in the States.

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
their families:
http://saluteheroes.org/ & http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/
Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops. You are not forgotten. Thanks ! ! !

Re: First Scotch recommendation



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 Sam Adams puts out some tasty malted beverages, I'm a fan of their
Oktoberfest. Yuengling, America's Oldest Brewery, also has some tasty
stuff.. Not all European Beer is that hot either. I tried an expensive
Samichlas (sp?) given as a gift, and it was awful (IMHO).
 But back onto the subject of first dram: Aberlour 10, Dalmore Cigar Malt,
Macallan 12 or Lagavulin 16 should entice any "rookie" into a lifetime of
fine drinking.



Re: First Scotch recommendation


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I believe Sam Adams has also been bought out, but still maintains the
integrity of its character.

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I have the Aberlour a' bounadh, which is a tasty dram, indeed, and the
Lagavulin 16, which is also a delightful dram. I must pick up the Macallan
12 and the Dalmore, just for the sake of scientific enquiry, of course.

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
their families:
http://saluteheroes.org/ & http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/
Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops. You are not forgotten. Thanks ! ! !

Re: First Scotch recommendation



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Unless they didn't tell the stockholders Sam Adams has not been bought out.
They have bought a few of the smaller brewiers themselves.  With reguards to
whisky, I am ashamed to admit I started with a blend (Pinch) but moved
rapidly into single malts.(Lagavulin,Ardmore, Macallen (which I have never
developed a taste for-more for everyone else)).
MerryD



Re: First Scotch recommendation


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Maybe it was Anchor. I drink more than I read!

I, too, started with Haig & Haig Pinch, which I nipped from my Dad's stash
back in the late 40's. That Ardmore (17?) is a good dram, which I've gifted
several friends with, as well. I also like the Laphroaig and Ardmore. Clan
MacGregor is great for cooking, in things like Cock-a-Leekie, Seed Cake,
Mincemeats, Athole Brose and, of course, Haggis. Only a fine SMS should be
used for a Hot Toddy. IMDO

--
Nick. Support severely wounded and disabled War on Terror Veterans and
their families:
http://saluteheroes.org/ & http://www.woundedwarriorproject.org/
Thank a Veteran and Support Our Troops. You are not forgotten. Thanks ! ! !

Re: First Scotch recommendation


wrote:

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A lot of serious beer drinkers -- the ale crowd especially -- find anything Sam
Adams produces to be at the lower end of acceptably flavorful or hoppy. The
brews I've had from the Philly Sam Adams brewpub (no relation to the bigger
Boston firm) have been much more interesting.

If you want something really good from the US, in addition to the widely
acclaimed Anchor Steam and Sierra Nevada products, try some brews from Rogue or
Anderson Valley.

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Got to disagree here. I've visited Yuengling as well, and their brews are
universally weak. Dishwater class eastern bilge. Try your better local brewpubs
for something much better.

-- Larry



Re: First Scotch recommendation


pltrgyst wrote:
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Please define "weak". ABV?

--

Brett



Re: First Scotch recommendation


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I find Sam Adams ordinary - Boston Lager (! - it's really an amber or pale
ale) to be excellent on draught and miserable from a bottle.  It ain't real
ale, but that's really scarce everywhere, while Sam is available just about
everywhere - Sam Adams is to American independents as Greene King is to
British...

Their other offerings don't usually excite me, although my German wife likes
their Hefeweizen and I don't ming the odd hit of their Cherry Wheat.

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Living on the East Coast, I find Yuengling "Lager" an excellent universally
available thing, it's almost like good keg bitter.  For the price of it
(often the same as the real dishwater class "domestic" beers), it's hard to
beat.

Another refreshing thing in Yuengling's favour is that it isn't too strong.
American craft brewers have some kind of congenital inability to brew beer
below 4.5ABV (not that they usually mention the strength on the label or
pump), which rules most of them out as good session beers.



Re: First Scotch recommendation



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One problem is apparently the fact that domestic US malt tends to be
very bland. They need to use a lot more to bring up the flavour . The
UK brewers are very good at making tasty low ABV beers.

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