Sugar content of Scotch

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How much sugar is in whiskey?  I have always thought that the
distillation process would eliminate the residual sugar in the mash and
that whiskey would be almost free of any sugar.  Does anyone know how
many sugar molecules escape during distillation?

Re: Sugar content of Scotch



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None to speak of...low carbers love the hard stuff because it has zero
carbs (although there are plenty of calories)

--
*************************
Wayne Crannell
Sherman, TX
"Anyone but the Cowpies"
*************************

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Alcohol is not a carbohydrate?


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Dave Hinz wrote:

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That's right, it's an... alcohol. :-)
--
Steve Loft, Glenlivet.

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Right, C2H6O if I'm not mistaken?  So at what point does a carb stop
being a carb?  Wikipedia says, in part:

Carbohydrates are chemical compounds that contain oxygen, hydrogen, and
carbon atoms. They consist of monosaccharide sugars of varying chain
lengths and that have the general chemical formula Cn(H2O)n or are
derivatives of such.

Ah.  Hydrate as in H2O, not H6O as in ethanol.  Go figure.  

It's been too long, or  not enough, since college chemistry class.
I'll go with "not long enough" actually.


Re: Sugar content of Scotch


Użytkownik "Dave Hinz" napisał:
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C2H5OH, actually.

Cheers,
Rajmund



--
http://www.whisky.pl http://www.bestofwhisky.pl


Re: Sugar content of Scotch


Rajmund wrote:
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Same thing, really. Dave was quoting the empirical formula.
--
Steve Loft, Glenlivet.

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Well, surely, that depends on your notation method.  Are you drawing it,
or describing the ratios?


Re: Sugar content of Scotch


Uzytkownik "Dave Hinz" napisal:

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Sorry, my mistake. I just didn't notice the lack of the last "H" in C2H6O,
only the "6" drew my attention. And for some reason or other, my chemistry
teachers always taught me there should be an "OH" at the end of alcohols.
Apparently, that is not necessarily the case as I've just checked.

Cheers,
Rajmund


--
http://www.whisky.pl http://www.bestofwhisky.pl



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No worries.


I've seen it done both ways.  My high school teachers did it one way,
and in college it was the other way.  

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Well, I'm sure either makes sense depending on why you're using the
formula.  For teaching, the trailing "OH" makes the structure more
recognizable.  If you're trying to figure out what you'll have after a
reaction, the other way probably makes more sense.

On a lighter note, I'm thinking of buying something in the $70.00 range
tonight, been out of SMS for a while at home.  Anyone got a suggestion
in the somewhat-peaty area?  Oban, Talisker, something like that?


Re: Sugar content of Scotch


Dave Hinz wrote:

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Talisker, Dave, definitely.
--
Steve Loft, Glenlivet.

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Can't go wrong with a classic.  I'm not up to a whole bottle of
Lagavulin, but I need something peaty this time.  Thanks

Dave


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In the religion of low carb, it is "something else" - lovely science,
that. Carbs, protein, and fat are all metabolized into sugars the body
uses for energy. The whole idea behind low carb (which has been around
for many decades before the craze that has just recently passed) is that
it is harder to metabolize protein than it is carbs and even more
difficult to metabolize fats. If you remove the majority of carbs, the
body works harder to use the remaining energy sources in protein and fat
and you set yourself up for easier weight loss. BUT, you can't just eat
unlimited steaks and three sticks of butter a day, as some would like
you to believe. Calories definitely DO count.

Alcohol is a fourth "fuel" that is used first, before anything else, by
the body, which is the reason, aside from high calorie content, that
alcohol consumption is strongly discouraged on most LC plans. A healthy
dram of SMS will stop LC weight loss dead in its tracks for a week.
This, among other things, is why I am glad to have lost my weight!
(almost five years)

--
*************************
Wayne Crannell
Sherman, TX
"Anyone but the Cowpies"
*************************

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Yabut, it turns into...

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I've always figured the way to go to lose weight, is to take in fewer
calories than you exert.  You know, eat less and move around more.  Hard
to sell books with that as a method, because it's too short and obvious.  
Also wouldn't sell because it tells people that it's how they're chosing
to behave that adds to the problem, which people really, really don't
like to hear.

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Because it gives the body an easy source of fuel, rather than burning
fat or whatever to get the energy?  Makes sense.

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I get a lot of exercise just keeping my property up.  Lots of trees to
trim, weeds to control, critters to keep out of the vegetable garden,
that sort of thing.  Move around more, isn't a problem, at least not so
far.  In the meantime I'll continue enjoying a bottle of SMS every 3
months or so which seems to be my rate.


Re: Sugar content of Scotch



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Not to belabor this discussion here, but yup. That's the little secret
that rabid low carbers won't mention. It's still about the calories. All
low carb does is reduce cravings and hunger by a lot...it was easier for
me to eat less, because it didn;t seem like I was eating less. Over at
alt.support.low-carb, they'll have you believe that protein calories are
somehow less harmful than carb calories....they love to say you can eat
more low carb than high carb calories...bull! Any diet works IF you can
follow it and stay with it.

Now to return to our regular programming....I really need some
Glenfarclas CS!

--
Wayne Crannell
Sherman, TX

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says...

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I've also wondered about where the sweetness in whisky comes from -
whether it's from sugar or some other substance that "fools" the tounge
the way sacharin and Nutrasweet do?  

Even if maltose doesn't survive fermentation and distillation I suppose
the oak could contribute some plant sugars.  It certainly contributes
vanillin which makes things taste sweeter than they are - that's one of
the reasons bakers add vanilla to cookies and cakes and such.

And if the whisky is aged in sherry or port casks it might aquire some
sugar from the previous occupants.

Beyond that it's still an open question as far as I know.

Bart

-----------------------------------------------------------------------


(How long will a bottle of whisky keep?)

If unopened - Ad Infinitum!   If opened - until temptation prevails.

------  Jas Milne
        in alt.drinks.scotch-whisky 28 Feb 2003



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When I first started reading Michael Jackson's whisky reviews he would
constantly talk about a malt's sweetness, and I would think, "Sweet?  Where
do you get sweet?!?  For chrissakes, it is WHISKY you are talking about."
But sweetness describes a lot of really luscious, malty whiskies I love
(when I was 10 years old I was addicted to Horlicks malt tablets available
at our local pharmacy--and in my teens I would never a touch a "shake" that
did not contain the precious powder that made it a "malted milk").


So there's no sugar?



Re: Sugar content of Scotch


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Hi Douglas,

I certainly taste sweetness in many whiskies, and as I said before
some of that sweetness might come from the cask.  I just don't know
if any of the sugars from the malted barley survive fermentation and
distillation.

Whether there is actual sugar in whisky is a question for chemists,
analysts, and the chromatograph boys.  I haven't seen any info on that.
I would be interested though, if I knew where to look.

Bart

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

When I took a sip, I knew it wouldn't kill me, either, but
there are just some things that you know you'll wish you
hadn't survived...

         (Regarding tasting an old bottle of Chiveas Regal)



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