Alochol

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 Is it possible to make the alcohol content higher using the Beer Machine??
The beer is good but seems to be low in alcohol.

Thanks



Re: Alochol


wrote:

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More sugar equals more alcohol (up to a point).  Add some corn sugar
(dextrose) or malt extract.  

Fermentation may be more active and the Beer Machine has to deal with
breaking down the foam so it won't plug the airlock - keep an eye on
it.


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Re: Alochol



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Just add a bit more sugar, an extra 250g in the small model should
help, but figure out what percentage your kit is giving and how much
you should reasonably add, or someone else might suggest a figure that
isn't just a wild guess as to what might be about right.

Use a pure sugar and it shouldn't affect the taste at all while adding
some alcohol.  Can someone tell me if table sugar is pure?  Or is it
something in there that makes people so reluctant to use it in brewing?  
You should be able to pick up a bag of dextrose anywhere that sells
home brew supplies anyway.  

Note that if the alcohol goes too high the yeast won't cope and will
stop fermenting.  Then you'll taste the unfernemted sugars.  Too high
is somewhere around 6 or 7% as I understand it.  The thing to remember
about the beer machine is that for the fermentation stage it's just a
small carboy as far as you're concerned, so anything you read on
homebrew information sites is going to apply once you adjust for size.

http://www.howtobrew.com taught me a fair bit about the theory and
practice of what I was doing.  No matter how simple to use your
equipment may be, it's nice to know just what's going on in there.

Apologies for things I've told you that you already know.
Abject apologies for things I've told you that are wrong, I'm sure the
nice people here will let us know about those.

peter

Re: Alochol



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"Pure" is relative and subject to a lot of hyperbole.  From what I
read table sugar (cane sugar) should ferment out completely as should
dextrose (corn sugar).  All the sugar turns into alcohol . . .

Digressing for a bit . . . regarding hype and the word "pure."  Ivory
Soap has been "new and improved" some hundreds of times since it was
introduced in the 1800's, yet it has always been "99.9% pure" (what?)
Do they really thing I'm stupid enough to believe they can fiddle with
the last .1% and make a real difference in the product?  All they
gotta do is fool some people into thinking the product is better
because the packaging has changed.

I stick with maltose, but that's mainly because there was a lot of
propaganda about cane sugar causing a cidery taste.  It is entirely
possible that maltose masks the cidery taste that would be present in
all beer except for the masking effect.  Frankly I don't know.

I make very good beer using all maltose, so, for the time being,  I
plan to continue making all maltose beer.  The difference in cost?
Not significant compared to good beer, the labor of love, and the
spiritual sanctity of food.  but that's just an opinion . . .

Read the theory, listen to the experts, all you want;  in the end do
what works for you.  This is art and science.  Learn the science;
practice the art.  Or, to express it another way: there are no
experts.

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Some yeasts are supposed (advertised) to go to 20% (distiller's
yeasts).  Champagne yeast tolerates ~10% with no problems.  Now . . .
if you brew with maltose and use a champagne yeast, that doesn't mean
you get champagne.  You get some bastard of a brew that may be good
but don't expect to match some other style just based on ingredients.
Ditto: baker's yeast pitched into wort doesn't yield bread, but makes
pretty good beer, but it may not pin down the style you're trying for.
In the 2-6% range it is dependant on the yeast and sugar- almost
anything works - outside that you may need to let it ferment longer
(below 2% who will ever know?)

Regarding carboys and sugar and percents of alcohol:  I figure on
about .8% per pound of fermentable sugar in five gallons of liquid.
(or did back when I used a hydrometer)
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Excellent site.  

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No need for the disclaimer.  Some of the experts just need to realize
we should all advance the art of homebrew.  No one has all the
answers, no one controls all the variables - not to mention the most
important variable:  One's individual taste!

Unless we all start brewing in passivated stainless steel with
ingredients from the same place, and time,  with equipment that came
off the same cookie cutter . . .

Thomas Edison had something to say about that.  He wrote something
like "you read about an expert's knowledge and trust it because of the
name associated with it, but when you do the experiment, you find that
the idea isn't supported by the experiment."  (not verbatim - too lazy
to look it up, and I really don't think T.E. was a scientist, just a
guy trying to make a buck from other people's discoveries, like Bill
Gates, half a brain and a lot of showmanship and greed)



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Re: Alochol



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99.44%



Re: Alochol


said in alt.beer.home-brewing:

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The cidery taste is mainly due to old kits that, coincidentally, told
you to add sugar.  (It's cheaper to get the alcohol content up that
way than for them to add more extract.)  It's the "old" part that
makes the beer cidery-tasting.  Sugar, whether malt, corn sugar, milk
sugar or table sugar, won't do it.  Using anything other than malt
*will*, however, make the beer "thinner" tasting.

Re: Alochol


Hi,
I think the problem with adding maltose up the alcholol level that is alters
the malt - hops balance? That is with just pure maltose you a re altering
the taste.

To me rather than add some of the more expensive spray malts with hops, I
have been buying two cheap kits in tins (like coopers) and combining them
into one brew.
I have found it to be very effective especially for stouts and draughts.

Try adding mash grains to a kit too. I found that to be a easy way to
fortify the guts into it.


Cheers


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Re: Alochol


On Mon, 2 May 2005 19:41:37 +1200, "Hataitai"

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No.  If you have a wort that's short on malt, adding malt will bring
it up to where it should be.  One would assume that you have the
correct amount of hops added at each stage.

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Yes, you are.  Water needs to have its taste altered if you want to
turn it into beer.  Otherwise you could just make Budweiser (by adding
a few drops of yellow food coloring to water).

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Or just start with malt and hops.  There's no need to spend the extra
money on a kit, when all that's in a kit is malt and hops.  And, by
using your own malt and hops, you know what you're getting.

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People add sugar (of one sort or another) to increase the alcohol
content.  Mashing specialty grains doesn't do that, it just adds
flavor and/or color.

Re: Alochol


Hi,

I thought that the originator of this thread was just replacing added sugar
in the recipy with malt, i.e. not adding more malt, hence my advice.

Yes adding malt will alter the taste which is the purpose of brewing , but
most people prefer to retain the hop taste as well.

Lastly given the nature of the question gave the impression that the
originator of the thread was inexperienced, I would never recommend to a
begiiner that they try this until they have kits working well, followed by
what that person was doing which was experiemting with ading taste.

Cheers



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Re: Alochol


 Thanks to all of you for the information it is very helpful ....



Re: Alochol


You can also add malt extract or any other fermentable sugar.  Some are more
desirable than others.  I knew one fellow who used molasses.  Actually
wasn't that bad.  Using a lot of sugar can make your beer sour.  Using Malt
extract avoids this.  A cup or two of sugar shouldn't be a problem but using
it in quantities of more than 50 percent is going to effect the taste.  Also
beer that has a lot of alcohol doesn't taste all that great.  The Alcohol
taste overwhelms the beer.
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