Using cans past their "best before" date

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I've just discovered a couple of cans in the bottom of the cupboard -
both nearly a year after their "Best Before" date.  One is a can of malt
extract, the other is a wheat beer kit.

Does anyone know if I should just chuck these out, or are they still
likely to be able to make drinkable beer?

Any suggestions appreciated

Cheers
Robert

Re: Using cans past their "best before" date
I had several cans that were outdated quite a bit.  I used them and wished
that I hadn't ~ it produced some awful tasting stuff that I just dumped.  As
a matter of fact, one of the cans that I opened smelled and looked so bad
that I sent it down the tubes.


"Robert Fraser" <"rf at paradise net nz"> wrote in message
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Re: Using cans past their "best before" date
Thanks, that's good to know.  I'll have to be a bit more careful in
future :-(

Gene wrote:
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Re: Using cans past their "best before" date
To the best of my knowledge ( which I do admit is not that much)  the
best before usually refers to the yeast in the package.
I have used some expired cans before - using fresh yeast instead of the
original one and the beer came out pretty good.


Hippocampus

"Who Dares Wins"

Robert Fraser wrote:
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Re: Using cans past their "best before" date
On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 13:58:02 +1300, Robert Fraser <"rf at paradise net
nz"> wrote:

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I recently tried to brew an old kit, with a best before date over 4
years old.  I decided to try brewing it - if nothing else I might
learn something.  The kit never fermented out to anything close to
what it was supposed to - I think the target FG was 1.008 but it
stopped at 1.024 or so.  (Initial gravity was where it was supposed to
be.)  Fermentation was never vigorous, but it wasn't dead, either.

Figuring the yast might be too old, I bought a fresh batch of
champange yeast (figuring it might do better in the presence of some
alcohol), rehydrated it, fed it some sugar water to hopefully get the
population up, dropped in some yeast nutrient to boot.  Fermentation
activity in the starter water was very good.  I then pitched that into
the wort/beer.  Fermentation restarted and the gravity dropped but it
eventually quit at 1.018.  The "beer" tasted a little odd... not
infected or anything... just a harsh sharp taste which I think some
would attribute to oxidation.  (Not having tasted a known oxidized
sample, I have no reference to know for sure.)  I didn't think this
batch would improve much with time and bottle conditioning, so I
tossed the batch.  (I wasn't really interested in bottling everything
then having to dump it all.)

Subsequent to this event, I have read that some believe that the
extract can oxidize in the can over time.  I tend to believe this to
be the case, given my experience.  I do believe the beer would have
been "drinkable" in the sense that the beer wasn't bad and wouldn't
harm you, but it wouldn't be an enjoyable beer.  YMMV.

Steve


Re: Using cans past their "best before" date

And if you can't enjoy it, why drink it just to be rid of it!

<freebeer-at-rogers-dot-com> wrote in message
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Re: Using cans past their "best before" date
On Sat, 22 Jan 2005 13:58:02 +1300, Robert Fraser <"rf at paradise net
nz"> said in alt.beer.home-brewing:

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Depends on your taste buds.  Some people consider Corona in clear
bottles, or Budweiser, "drinkable beer".

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