Beer label critique

I was hoping to get a couple of sincere critiques on a beer label I have designed for a local brewery. I was going for the Agri-Lithography look of old. In the early 1900's, produce crates had a very distinctive look about them, and since the brewery in located in the Salinas Valley, the Salad Bowl of the World, I figured that would be a good idea. What do you guys think?
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Reply to
Sandra
> I was hoping to get a couple of sincere critiques on a beer label I > have designed for a local brewery. I was going for the > Agri-Lithography look of old. In the early 1900's, produce crates had > a very distinctive look about them, and since the brewery in located > in the Salinas Valley, the Salad Bowl of the World, I figured that > would be a good idea. What do you guys think? > >
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I love 'em! Used to live in Salinas back in the 1980s, right on the southern edge of town by the broccoli fields. I remember the horrible fecking beer from the famously awful brewpub in Monterey. These labels look wonderful, especially if you do get greater color saturation on paper. Only criticism I would offer is that the different fonts for the different styles are distracting. I'd actually prefer one font, something fat but readable. But that's just me.
Hey guys...you notice that they have a "Hefe-Weizen" and an "American Wheat?" They get it.
-- Lew Bryson
www.LewBryson.com Author of "New York Breweries" and "Pennsylvania Breweries," 2nd ed., both available at The Hotmail address on this post is for newsgroups only: I don't check it, or respond to it. Spam away.
--
Lew Bryson

www.LewBryson.com
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Reply to
Lew Bryson
> I was hoping to get a couple of sincere critiques on a beer label I > have designed for a local brewery. I was going for the > Agri-Lithography look of old. In the early 1900's, produce crates had > a very distinctive look about them, and since the brewery in located > in the Salinas Valley, the Salad Bowl of the World, I figured that > would be a good idea. What do you guys think? > >
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I like them and I like the different fonts. Good work!
Reply to
jimbreckenridge201(nospam)
> I was hoping to get a couple of sincere critiques on a beer label I > have designed for a local brewery. I was going for the > Agri-Lithography look of old. In the early 1900's, produce crates had > a very distinctive look about them, and since the brewery in located > in the Salinas Valley, the Salad Bowl of the World, I figured that > would be a good idea. What do you guys think?
Nicely done. I like the color shifting and matching it to the color of the beer the label is for.
I'm not a fan of some of the typefaces, though, like the Nut Brown or the Bock.
If I were to be really nitpicky and evaluate these like I evaluate designs at work, I'd say that there's a bit of an issue with visual emphasis on the bottom half of the label. To me, the style of beer inside the bottle is more important than the trailing part of the brewery's name. "Brewing" overwhelms many of the beer variety labels. But, you've got a very nice balance there, and playing around with the relative weighting on the bottom half of the label could easily disrupt that.
As I said, it's being nitpicky. These labels are really very nicely done.
-Steve
Reply to
Steve Jackson
> I was hoping to get a couple of sincere critiques on a beer label I > have designed for a local brewery. I was going for the > Agri-Lithography look of old. In the early 1900's, produce crates had > a very distinctive look about them, and since the brewery in located > in the Salinas Valley, the Salad Bowl of the World, I figured that > would be a good idea. What do you guys think? > >
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Very nice. Might I suggest that the design be varied slightly on the Bock label, with a goat or three cavorting through the field?
Alan Follett
Reply to
Alan Follett
Very good but stick with the same font for each beer. I wish our British breweries would employ decent graphic designers.
BTW What's a Scottish Red?
Red beers are more associated with Ireland.
Reply to
Jeff Pickthall
>I was hoping to get a couple of sincere critiques on a beer label I >have designed for a local brewery. I was going for the >Agri-Lithography look of old. In the early 1900's, produce crates had >a very distinctive look about them, and since the brewery in located >in the Salinas Valley, the Salad Bowl of the World, I figured that >would be a good idea. What do you guys think? > >
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I think the overall design is very attractive, and that you'd done a nice job on the main type and the general layout. I do have a few suggestions, though.
I'm not at all keen on the typefaces you chose for the beer names, especially in conjunction with the primary typeface. The only one that reall works for me is the Scottish Red, which not only doesn't clash with the primary, but is even a little evocative of medieval Scotland to me. The Nut Brown is a good example of what doesn't work. The Chocolate Porter comes close.
The other substantive issue is to me is that you're using the same landscape on every label, so that the only variant is color. While having a cohesive product design is good, as a client I would definitely want to see more variation within the design.
More comps!
--Jeff Frane
Reply to
Jeff Frane
Nice looking labels. But what about alcohol percentage and stuff like that? "Sandra" schreef in bericht news:a339476d.0309102114.345d29a0@posting.google.com... > I was hoping to get a couple of sincere critiques on a beer label I > have designed for a local brewery. I was going for the > Agri-Lithography look of old. In the early 1900's, produce crates had > a very distinctive look about them, and since the brewery in located > in the Salinas Valley, the Salad Bowl of the World, I figured that > would be a good idea. What do you guys think? > >
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