Cider measures

I notice that both Aldi and Lidl are selling ciders from Devon at £1.29 a pint (568ml)
Is there any reason why bottles of cider can still be sold in imperial measures, whereas beer is almost always sold in 500ml bottles?
Reply to
M Platting
> I notice that both Aldi and Lidl are selling ciders from Devon at > £1.29 a pint (568ml) > > Is there any reason why bottles of cider can still be sold in imperial > measures, whereas beer is almost always sold in 500ml bottles? Some beer is also sold in pint bottles. The breweries that do not sell it in that size do so out of choice not of necessity. -- Andy Leighton => andyl@azaal.plus.com "The Lord is my shepherd, but we still lost the sheep dog trials" - Robert Rankin, _They Came And Ate Us_
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Reply to
Andy Leighton
> I notice that both Aldi and Lidl are selling ciders from Devon at > £1.29 a pint (568ml) > > Is there any reason why bottles of cider can still be sold in imperial > measures, whereas beer is almost always sold in 500ml bottles?
It's bloody Magners. That is sold in pint bottles (the marketing material refers to this) so all the other cider makers trying to jump on the Magners bandwagon do it too.
Beer and cider can be sold in bottles of any size so long as the size is stated. Most beer is in 500ml bottles because the drinks industry has discovered people don't discriminate between 500ml and a pint, so they might as well supply 68ml less beer for the price. The 'Magners market' is a special case.
Paul
Reply to
Paul Sherwin
> > It's bloody Magners. That is sold in pint bottles (the marketing material > refers to this) so all the other cider makers trying to jump on the > Magners bandwagon do it too. >
Pint glass half full of ice means that the pint of Magners won't fit in. Bottle stays on table, instant free advertising.
I hate Magners and those who drink it. People who drink a fashion statement and have no discernment at all about what they're drinking. Other drinks that irritate me:
1. Caffreys. I've heard more than one person say of a pub "ooh, they do a lovely pint of Caffreys in here". Akin to saying "they do a lovely can of Carling here".
2. Budweiser, the American sort. Why??
3. Becks. All those lovely German beers and what do people drink? Just about the only one with no taste at all.
4. Guinness Extra Cold. Pint of stout and remove the flavour, please!
5. Fosters. All lager really, but there's something particularly foul and metallic about Fosters.
That's better.
Reply to
WolfWilf
Yea, bloody Magners drinkers. Why if you like cider do you choose to chuck loads of ice on it? Its the muppets who are lead by adverts and T.V commercials. Still now the weather has changed I am sure they are all back to Stella or other flavour of the month lagers. > >> >> It's bloody Magners. That is sold in pint bottles (the marketing material >> refers to this) so all the other cider makers trying to jump on the >> Magners bandwagon do it too. >> > > Pint glass half full of ice means that the pint of Magners won't fit in. > Bottle stays on table, instant free advertising. > > I hate Magners and those who drink it. People who drink a fashion > statement and have no discernment at all about what they're drinking. > Other drinks that irritate me: > > 1. Caffreys. I've heard more than one person say of a pub "ooh, they do > a lovely pint of Caffreys in here". Akin to saying "they do a lovely can > of Carling here". > > 2. Budweiser, the American sort. Why?? > > 3. Becks. All those lovely German beers and what do people drink? Just > about the only one with no taste at all. > > 4. Guinness Extra Cold. Pint of stout and remove the flavour, please! > > 5. Fosters. All lager really, but there's something particularly foul > and metallic about Fosters. > > That's better. > > >
Reply to
Ade

Becks is at least quite hoppy. I think less deserving of your crit. However it isn't high on my list of things to drink if there are better alternatives.
It's hugely better than American Bud for example, but then, what isn't!
Reply to
Bill Hewitt
On Mon, 1 Oct 2007 19:28:02 +0100, Paul Sherwin wrote (in message ): > >> I notice that both Aldi and Lidl are selling ciders from Devon at >> £1.29 a pint (568ml) >> >> Is there any reason why bottles of cider can still be sold in imperial >> measures, whereas beer is almost always sold in 500ml bottles? > > It's bloody Magners. That is sold in pint bottles (the marketing material > refers to this) so all the other cider makers trying to jump on the > Magners bandwagon do it too. > > Beer and cider can be sold in bottles of any size so long as the size is > stated. Most beer is in 500ml bottles because the drinks industry has > discovered people don't discriminate between 500ml and a pint, so they > might as well supply 68ml less beer for the price. The 'Magners market' is > a special case. > > Paul
It's great that cider in general has been boosted by the marketing of Magners. I bet that wasn't their idea when they approved the budget for it.
Reply to
Tim
> > I hate Magners and those who drink it. People who drink a fashion > statement and have no discernment at all about what they're drinking. > Other drinks that irritate me: >
But since the promotion of that awful product, sales in and interest of real cider and perry have rocketed fuelled no doubt by those same people you hate.
Brett
Reply to
Brett...
> >It's great that cider in general has been boosted by the marketing of >Magners. I bet that wasn't their idea when they approved the budget for >it.
Is Magners actually proper cider or is is a chemical concoction as in most ciders you get in large plastic bottles form supermarkets? The stuff from Aldi looks quite genuine - it does say no added sweeteners or flavourings.
Reply to
M Platting
> > Beer and cider can be sold in bottles of any size so long as the size is > stated. Most beer is in 500ml bottles because the drinks industry has > discovered people don't discriminate between 500ml and a pint, so they > might as well supply 68ml less beer for the price. The 'Magners market' is > a special case.
It seems to be mostly Charles Wells who sell beer in pint bottles. Sam Smiths' beers are mostly in 550 ml bottles which is only slightly less than a pint.
There are a growing number of lagers being sold in pint cans now, though.
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Reply to
PeterE
> > Becks is at least quite hoppy. I think less deserving of your crit. However > it isn't high on my list of things to drink if there are better alternatives. > > It's hugely better than American Bud for example, but then, what isn't! >
Intriguingly, over here in the states, Bud is offered as some kind of halfway premium brand, with all the big brewers offering cheaper (and to my mind scarier) offerings. Pabst Blue Riband and Natural Light seem to feature predominantly in this band. It may be of little coincidence that these cheaper beers seem far more widely available in the big college towns...
Reply to
Simon Cooper
> "Bill Hewitt" wrote in message > news:ext8x6ld0ro.fsf@duffus.inf.ed.ac.uk... >> >> Becks is at least quite hoppy. I think less deserving of your crit. > However >> it isn't high on my list of things to drink if there are better > alternatives. >> >> It's hugely better than American Bud for example, but then, what isn't! >> > Intriguingly, over here in the states, Bud is offered as some kind of > halfway premium brand, with all the big brewers offering cheaper (and to my > mind scarier) offerings. Pabst Blue Riband and Natural Light seem to > feature predominantly in this band. It may be of little coincidence that > these cheaper beers seem far more widely available in the big college > towns...
UK 'American' Budweiser is brewed in the old Watneys brewery in Mortlake in West London, and is indeed marketed as a premium brand. It's a 5% ABV bottled beer here, though is occasionally seen in the 4.3% ABV draught version as brewed in the Irish Republic.
It trades heavily on the 'American' aspect - an ad campaign a few years ago showed Bud being delivered on a huge Mack truck to some depot in the US - not many of those about on the M25.
It's a poor beer and the people who drink it are clearly undiscriminating idiots with more money than sense, but you'll find it in the chill cabinets of most British pubs.
Paul
Reply to
Paul Sherwin
> UK 'American' Budweiser is brewed in the old Watneys brewery in Mortlake > in West London, and is indeed marketed as a premium brand. It's a 5% ABV > bottled beer here, though is occasionally seen in the 4.3% ABV draught > version as brewed in the Irish Republic. > > It trades heavily on the 'American' aspect - an ad campaign a few years > ago showed Bud being delivered on a huge Mack truck to some depot in the > US - not many of those about on the M25. > > It's a poor beer and the people who drink it are clearly undiscriminating > idiots with more money than sense, but you'll find it in the chill > cabinets of most British pubs. >
We used to visit The Board in Hawes. They did nice pint of Riggwelter then. But the lad behind the bar, the son of the landlord, preferred Budweiser. As we used to tell him, brewed thru a horse. But to him it was exotic -- even though totally tasteless. The family soon after that lost the pub.
nick
Reply to
nick
> But since the promotion of that awful product, sales in and interest of > real cider and perry have rocketed fuelled no doubt by those same people > you hate.
OK, fair comment. But time will tell whether or not any boost in sales of the real stuff will be sustained.
Reply to
WolfWilf
> M Platting queried..... Is Magners actually proper cider or is is a chemical concoction as in > most ciders you get in large plastic bottles form supermarkets? The > stuff from Aldi looks quite genuine - it does say no added sweeteners > or flavourings.
According to my brother in law, who works in food analysis, Magners is a proper cider - made from apples.
Still can't see why anyone would drink it given it's lack of taste. Mark
Reply to
Mark Stowell
> > "Brett..." wrote in message > news:13g4tjd96qd34a1@corp.supernews.com... >> But since the promotion of that awful product, sales in and interest of >> real cider and perry have rocketed fuelled no doubt by those same people >> you hate. > > OK, fair comment. But time will tell whether or not any boost in sales of > the real stuff will be sustained. >
Surely ANY increase (and we are talking substantial figures) of real cider and perry is something to be celebrated.
Reply to
Brett...
> Surely ANY increase (and we are talking substantial figures) of real cider > and perry is something to be celebrated.
I find it difficult to believe that the Magners drinker would necessarily try real cider any more than a budweiser-out-of-a-bottle drinker is likely to try real ale. Can you evidence this substantial increase in sales of real cider and perry?
Reply to
WolfWilf
> "Brett..." wrote in message > news:13gacljoem3ls8f@corp.supernews.com... > > Surely ANY increase (and we are talking substantial figures) of real > > cider and perry is something to be celebrated. > I find it difficult to believe that the Magners drinker would > necessarily try real cider any more than a budweiser-out-of-a-bottle > drinker is likely to try real ale. Can you evidence this substantial > increase in sales of real cider and perry?
The news media keep doing stories about the cider producers needing to up production to meet demand. If you aren't in a cider producing region you may not have seen the TV items.
The cynical portion of my mind says Bulmers might just be upping the production of the tat end of the market, but given the increasing sales at beer festivals it seems cider is fashionable.
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Steve Pampling
Reply to
Steven Pampling
>> > The cynical portion of my mind says Bulmers might just be upping the > production of the tat end of the market, but given the increasing sales at > beer festivals it seems cider is fashionable. >
OK, it does seem that overall cider consumption is up, probably due to the Magners effect making bottled cider on ice fashionable this year. That's a bubble as quickly burst as blown though. The connection between Magners consumption and increaased sales of real cider and perry is less clear though. I wouldn't think the two are closely connected.
In jersey this summer, many of the young folks seemed to be drinking Brothers strawberry cider. I reckon that's more to do with the increasing popularity of pink drinks than anything else.
Reply to
WolfWilf
> > The cynical portion of my mind says Bulmers might just be upping the > production of the tat end of the market, but given the increasing sales at > beer festivals it seems cider is fashionable.
Bulmers have of course launched 'Bulmers Original' in pint bottles to exploit the Magners market. Ironically this is what Magners is called in Ireland. Bulmers reps have been pushing this very hard in pubs, offering big discounts if licensees agree to stop stocking Magners. Most licensees have refused to do this because the Magners brand is so strong and margins are so good, but they often stock Bulmers alongside at a slightly lower price or only stock Magners in 1.5 pint bottles.
I remember a local licensee taking his first delivery of Magners when the craze first started a couple of years ago. He was outraged at the wholesale price for what is basically a cheap cider made from sugar and apple concentrate and couldn't believe the retail price the rep was suggesting he charge. "Nobody's going to pay that, they'll just have a pint of Strongbow." He took a couple of cases and they sold out in a day.
Paul
Paul
Reply to
Paul Sherwin

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