Preheating a pot


What water is used to preheat the teapot?
Is it the same water used for the infusion? Then how is it possible to get the right temperature, knowing that this water is cooling in the kettle while the teapot is rinsed?
If not, is the kettle used twice, once to preheat and once to infuse, which seems the right thing, but lengthen much more the preparation? Or should I have 2 kettles?
I use most of the time a metal pot, so preheating is absolutely necessary, given the heat conductivity of such pots.
GLau, novice
Reply to
GLau
Hi GLau,
I don't think that matters. You can even preheat your vessel under the tap of hot water.
No, because it gets a bit dirty. That depends how long/where you store the pot, but rising is also to get rid of the dust/oil that may be left in the pot and cups. You can use it to rinse the cups and keep it aside to rinse everything after drinking tea (well in the desert they save water that way).
You can rinse your pot with water at 95 degree C and then infuse the tea with the rest of water at 90 deg. C. Rinsing doesn't take such a long time. Well that depends at what temp. you want to brew that tea.
You never though of putting the kettle back on the stove/hot-plate/brasero/whatever while you rinse ?
About the traditional black iron that were used in Asia, they were used directly to boil the water, and then the tea leaves were thrown into the pot and stirred. You still see people that prepare tea that way in the countryside in China and Thailande. They can't afford a kettle + a pot.
Kuri
Reply to
cc
cc put his brain into words:
I thought purists never exceeded the wanted temp., in order to keep water sufficiently oxygenated.
Thanks, GLau
Reply to
GLau
GLaucclk6l$pfi$ snipped-for-privacy@news-sop.inria.fr7/9/04 04: snipped-for-privacy@no.spam.inria.sophia.fr
GLau,
First, I pour some hot water into the pot. Second, I pour this water out. Third, I put in the tea leaves. Fourth, I pour more hot water in. And so on.
I don't think the several seconds that it takes to rinse the teapot will allow the kettle to cool enough to make much difference.
No.
There is no need for two kettles.
Please consider changing to a ceramic pot. This will give you much more control over the temperature of the tea. Even the cheapest ceramic pot will be better than a metal one, in my opinion.
A more important question might be the quality of the water you use. Be sure to use a high quality water. Otherwise, poor water will ruin your tea.
Michael
Reply to
Michael Plant
Michael,
I do not want to launch a troll, but I like black teas -- especially strong ones -- in metal pots. The main advantage is that such pots keep temperature during a long time.
Nonetheless, I must confess I also use this pot (my only one) for green and oolong, which is *bad*, and will soon buy myself a new ceramic one.
GLau, learning every day
Reply to
GLau

Ah...this topic is discussed often. I think it just depends on how you like your Tea...I, for my side, think that water that did not boil provides a flat tasting Tea. Then again, only 2 years ago, I used do it vice versa...
try, taste and find out for yourself... Patrick
--
"But please remember: this is only a work of Fiction.
 The truth, as always, will be far stranger"
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Reply to
Patrick Heinze
GLauccm3d1$6vp$ snipped-for-privacy@news-sop.inria.fr7/9/04 08: snipped-for-privacy@no.spam.inria.sophia.fr
If you are happy with it, then of course keep it. I only asked you to "consider."
Not "bad," but perhaps not practical.
Michael, likewise
Reply to
Michael Plant
The Tao Te Ching suggests that to become smart, learn something new every day. To become wise, unlearn something every day.
-DM (Becoming wise at an increasing pace, if my declining memory is any indication)
Reply to
Dog Ma 1
The Tao Te Ching suggests that to become smart, learn something new every day. To become wise, unlearn something every day.
-DM (Becoming wise at an increasing pace, if my declining memory is any indication)
Reply to
Dog Ma 1
The Tao Te Ching suggests that to become smart, learn something new every day. To become wise, unlearn something every day.
-DM (Becoming wise at an increasing pace, if my declining memory is any indication)
Reply to
Dog Ma 1
The Tao Te Ching suggests that to become smart, learn something new every day. To become wise, unlearn something every day.
-DM (Becoming wise at an increasing pace, if my declining memory is any indication)
Reply to
Dog Ma 1
The Tao Te Ching suggests that to become smart, learn something new every day. To become wise, unlearn something every day.
-DM (Becoming wise at an increasing pace, if my declining memory is any indication)
Reply to
Dog Ma 1
Dog Ma 1nHyHc.76452$ snipped-for-privacy@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net7/9/04 11:18spamdogma snipped-for-privacy@att.net reply w/o spam
Aha. I cast my lot with the unlearned.
Reply to
Michael Plant
I don't know how long you've been lurking but you will receive plenty of good advice from the regulars at time contradictory. There is no wrong or right just advice however based on lots of personal experience. A year ago when a glass pot shattered in my hands I switched to a cheap Chinese stainless steel pot. I discovered I liked the 'scalding' action on black teas. Better yet I don't have to be awake in the morning when I make tea. I'd recommend two more metal pots for oolongs and greens. They will eventually develop a patina which is also something new I learned about metal. It's a better uniform patina than clay or ceramics although those are quicker to form to seal material. You also can't go wrong with cheap ceramic but if you look can find clay cheaper. The first step in tea branches into many forks and converges at your personal preference which over the ions is a moving target. I feel a quantum reality check coming on which can't be. If I understand this right you have a country woman living in Japan who posts here.
Jim
> Michael, > > > Please consider changing to a ceramic pot. This will give you much more > > control over the temperature of the tea. Even the cheapest ceramic pot > > will be better than a metal one, in my opinion. > > I do not want to launch a troll, but I like black teas -- especially strong > ones -- in metal pots. The main advantage is that such pots keep > temperature during a long time. > > Nonetheless, I must confess I also use this pot (my only one) for green and > oolong, which is *bad*, and will soon buy myself a new ceramic one. > > > GLau, learning every day
Reply to
Space Cowboy

There's no need to fear! Trolling is a deliberate act.
So do I.
Metal pots don't keep their heat for a long time. They just feel hot when you touch them.
If you brewed your tea in a perfect insulator, the tea wouldn't ever cool, and the vessel's exterior wouldn't ever be warm. Metal, being an excellent thermal conductor, takes the heat from the infusion, and radiates it into the environment, thereby facilitating quicker cooling of the tea.
Does this matter? If you like the tea you're having, it doesn't matter a bit, does it?
This means you aren't one of the Living Dead.
Reply to
Hamilcar Barca
--
"But please remember: this is only a work of Fiction.
  The truth, as always, will be far stranger"
 Click to see the full signature
Reply to
Ole Kvaal
"Dog Ma 1" writes:
Is there a good reason not to try to do both?
/Lew
--
Lew Perin / perin@acm.org
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
Reply to
Lewis Perin

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