Russian Tea con't

Has anyone tried the Kusmi/Kuzmi/Kousmichoff teas? I saw them at a Williams-Sonoma store the other day but didn't buy any before I could investigate. I went home and did a web search and found that the company originated in St. Petersberg in 1867, then fled to Paris during the Bolshevik Revolution, and remains the only "authentic" Russian tea firm.
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Thanks, Bert
Reply to
Bert Fuller
Bert Fullerbejgr6$5of61$ snipped-for-privacy@ID-184524.news.dfncis.de7/10/03 06: snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com
Bert,
I enjoyed browsing through Kusmi's web site, and feel a certain kinship with him based on his description of his "Anastasia" tea (among others), to wit: "Kusmi Anastasia Tea is a Russian blend of Ceylon and China Teas scented with orange, bergamot, lemon and lime. Delicate, aromatic and lime-flavorful. Traditionally served neat. 4.4 oz." **Neat?** That's a term I've never heard applied to tea drinking, but often heard applied to another beverage for which Russia is justly famous.
Other curiosities: A scent of "buffalo grass" in the "Zoubrovska," and the use of muslin for the teabags. Buffalo grass????
The whole thing's intriguing.
Best, Michael
Reply to
Michael Plant
I don't know about their claim but the Israel label Wissotzky was founded in Moscow by Klonimus Wolf Wissotzky in 1849. They moved to London in 1907 then Palestine in 1936. I don't buy tea from high class department stores because it's more advertizing and packaging than substance and my bottom line too expensive. These types of stores have exclusive labels you can't find anywhere else. You know you're in a fru-fru store when you sample their tea from a coffee urn.
Jim
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Reply to
Space Cowboy
"Bert Fuller" writes:
I got a gift certificate to be used at a coffee/tea place last Christmas. The shop's bulk teas were stored in loosely sealed glass containers and the atmosphere was dominated by the smell of coffee being ground, so I had to choose prepackaged tea. What I ended up with was 2 Kusmi teas:
- Bouquet de Fleurs: *aggressively* scented, citrusy-floral, but nothing like an Earl Grey. I kind of liked it but would have liked it better with less scenting/flavoring, I think.
- Samovar: more or less like a Russian Caravan tea, I think (I don't have much experience with this type): smoky but less so than the Lapsangs I've tasted. I was happy to drink this for breakfast.
/Lew
Reply to
Lewis Perin
Julie C.eofPa.1581$ snipped-for-privacy@tor-nn1.netcom.ca7/10/03 11:13no-spanner@127.0.0.0
which, BTW, I drink neat.
Thanks, Julie.
Michael
Reply to
Michael Plant
Yes. It's my favorite brand of sented teas.
Their blends are scented with *exceptionaly good* aromatics originating from Grasse, a famous French flower center. Some of them are heavily sented ("Bouquet de fleurs"). Maybe too much. But they are never heavily *flavored*.
It took me some time before fully appreciating their subtle nuances, but now I think they are the best. The "Troïka" blend is a good starter.
Advice. You can buy Kusmi Tea in several kinds of packaging : - metal tins (extra small, 4.4 oz, extra big), - loose tea refills (3.5 oz boxes) - tea bags.
Don't buy the metal tins. They are pretty but twice as expensive as the loose tea refills and the covers are not properly sealed.
The story is true, but the "only authentic Russian tea firm" part is false advertising. Kousmichoff *was* a Russian tea compagny. Now it's 100% French. They can only have the pretense of making "historically correct" Russian style teas.
Reply to
Julie C.
Michael Plant wrote ...
Hmm, when I get through that bottle of Zubrowka I might just dry the blade of 'bison grass', chop it up and mix with some keemun and ceylon op and try it for myself ... what an incentive!
Reply to
The Immoral Mr Teas
"Julie C." writes:
Yes, I noticed that. Pretty strange for a company that puts so much effort into the way its product *smells*.
/Lew
Reply to
Lewis Perin
The French are the masters of scent and I don't mean daily hygiene. Personally I like to see what is adding to the scent\flavor of tea in the form of peel, petals, etc versus a chemical solvent passed as perfume. I like visiting the herbal stores and picking my own tisanes for tea. The popular French taste for tea is Vanilla. It's a scent and not a tea varietal otherwise tea would taste like grapes.
Jim
Reply to
Space Cowboy

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