American Beer vs German Beer

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What are the differences? TIA



Re: American Beer vs German Beer


jimmy wrote:

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In some cases, quite a lot.  In other cases, hardly anything at all.  It
all depends on which beer(s) you have in mind.  So, which beers do you
have in mind?  Do you realize that the answer isn't quite so simple as
to fit into a few sentences?

One significant difference is that, in general, German brewers are bound
by restrictions on what can and can not be used in beer.  An edict that
was issued 490 years ago set some ground rules in Bavaria, and while the
current rules that regulate German brewing aren't exactly the same as
that old edict, it still survives as something that German brewers tend
to cling to in an attempt to tell consumers that their product is
"pure."

American brewers are not bound by the same edict.

Some German brewers can fall back on traditions going back centuries; in
a couple of cases, that tradition goes back nearly a thousand years.
However, the bulk of beer consumed in Germany is pale lager made with
cultured lager yeast, a tradition that goes back only to the mid-19th
century.

American brewers can't point to a domestic tradition going back that
far, for obvious reasons.  Most modern American mass-produced beers are
derivations of those German pale lagers which first became popular in
the 19th century.

There's more, but that would take a while.  Go read a book or three if
you really want to know more, or better yet, book a trip to Germany and
learn first-hand.
--
dgs

Re: American Beer vs German Beer



dgs wrote:

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Man the differences are huge.  Germany is probably one of the best
countries in the world for beer alongside the Czech Republic and
Belgium.
Of course the US has some great beers and breweries but is light years
behind Germany in choice and style.
Most US breweries offer versions of European traditional styles and
have made strides in quality.
However if you're looking for the best try Schneiderweisse or
Fransiskaner for the wheat beers.
Still for my money the Czech beers Budvar, Staropramen, Krusovice
Pilsner Urquell are the best .


Re: American Beer vs German Beer


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You're a troll, right?
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Re: American Beer vs German Beer



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Actually, I'd disagree. As much as I love a great number of German beers, I
do not consider it a utopia of choice or style. Germany is quite parochial
when it comes to beer, and there's a lot that's quite difficult to find
outside a very narrow geographic region. And with some notable exceptions -
to oversimplify, Dusseldorf, Colgone and Bavaria - it's pretty much
variations of pils.

Whereas the US has abundant ales of many variieties, lagers of not quite as
many varieties, etc. There's hardly a style of beer in the world that
doesn't have an interpretation in the U.S.; in contrast, I challenge you to
find a German-brewed interpretation of a pale ale or a Belgian dubbel.

-Steve



Re: American Beer vs German Beer


greenspot wrote:

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Not so much as you might like to think.

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Really?  Just which German brewer produces something like Dogfish
Head's 90 Minute IPA, Allagash Interlude, Russian River's Pliny the
Elder, Full Sail Black Gold bourbon-barrel stout, or Elysian's Bete
Blanche?

OTOH, I spent Saturday afternoon of the recent Labor Day weekend
drinking delicious locally-brewed Pilsner and Oktoberfest in ...
Oroville, Washington, up by the Canadian border in the Okanagan country.
Damn good they were, too.  And the last bottle of Victory's Prima Pils
that I opened was in great shape, and that beer stands up to any Old
World Pilsner lager quite nicely.

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And then some.  And some of those US breweries are pushing the
boundaries too.  Not all of the attempts are successful, but those
that are have made others all over the world sit up and take notice,
even in Germany (and Belgium).

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They're good for starters, yep.

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So you like nice Czech and German lagers and Bavarian wheat beers.

What else, though?  The grand thing about the revival of quality
brewing in the USA that's been going on for the better part of three
decades (if you count New Albion, longer if you count Anchor Brewing)
has resulted in an explosion of styles.  Meanwhile, German brewing has
become hidebound and mired in its own restrictions, while consumption
there continues to drop.  Clearly, they aren't doing everything quite as
well in Good Ol' Germany as one would like to think.  The unrelenting
wave of German brewery shutdowns and consolidations is proof of that.

To be sure, I delight in German beer and beer culture, especially
those parts of preserved or revived tradition that include Alt,
Franconian low-carbonation and smoked lagers, wheat beers, and a few
other old-fashioned specialties.  But even German brewers acknowledge
that their trade needs something of a kick in the backside to get it
going again.
--
dgs

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