Adding Yeast


I have a batch of California Common that I am going to bottle today. The thing is, this should have been done about a month and a half ago. (Been REALLY busy) I was thinking of blooming about 1/4tsp of dry yeast and adding it to my bottling bucket, much the same way I do when I make naturally carbonated soda from extracts. With the soda, I add anywhere from 1/2 to 1tsp but my beer already hase some yeast in it (of course). I just want to be sure. Anybody have any suggestions, comments, warnings, ect.? Thanks,
Reply to
DragonTail281

Adding "bottling yeast" is a very common practice, especially when bottling lagers that have lagered for extended periods, since the cold temperatures usually kills the yeast or makes it drop out of suspension.
You can still do this with ales that have been sitting around for a long time (such as in this case), since there's a good chance few active yeast are still buzzing around, so supplimenting with a little bottling yeast will not do any harm.
I'd recommend 1/4-1/2 tsp for a 5 gallon batch. Any more than this & you risk over carbonation & bottle bombs.
Kent
Reply to
blah

Thanks, I was pretty much thinking that. I ended up just adding 1/8tsp, just incase. Hopefully it will be carbonated enough. Thanks again, Michael Herrenbruck DragonTail Ale Drunken Bee Mead
Reply to
DragonTail281

Adding yeast at bottling time won't hurt anything, but is rarely necessary. I routinely bottle lagers that have been sitting at 33F for months and have no problem carbonating. Unless it has been sitting for years, I wouldn't bother. (But again, it won't hurt).
Note, assuming *any* live yeast, adding more will not affect the carbonation level at all - you could put a bucket load in there. The carbonation comes only from the amount of sugar added - NOT yeast count. One yeast or one billion yeast ... either will *eventually* convert all the sugar to the same carbonation level.
Reply to
Derric

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