End of planting time for hops is quickly approaching


For any of you homebrewers who have been 'sitting on the fence' waiting to decide if you will grow hops, the time for planting is quickly running out depending upon where you are located. The northern areas probably still have another month or so, but in the southern climes you need to get your rhizomes planted ASAP. In addition, the window for obtaining rhizomes is quickly closing; many suppliers are already out of stock, and growers such as myself are reluctant to dig up rhizomes once they have major growth of their plants. However, you might be lucky to find some rhizomes on "clearance" at some local homebrew shops, and based on some recent posts in our Grow-Hops group, it appears that members in the north, especially Canada, might still be able to provide rhizomes, as well. Here is our list of links to sources that you can check to see what they still have in stock:
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If anyone needs advice on any aspect of growing, harvesting, or storing homegrown hops, our Grow-Hops group currently has 2,840 members, which includes many experienced growers and several commercial growers as well, so we are undoubtedly the best Internet resource for information to assist you. If interested:
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It is not difficult to grow hops, and once they are established each plant should provide between one and two pounds of dried hops; considering the price of hops, that's a pretty good value.
Cheers.
Bill Velek
Reply to
Bill Velek

You can say that again, slight dusting of snow last night and guys are reporting their hops are still under a foot of snow. Good for outdoor lagering though.
Reply to
dshesnicky

["Followup-To:" header set to alt.homebrewing.]
My cascade and golding hops from last year haven't sprouted yet (Texas). I ordered/planted one rhizome of tettnang last week on a whim. I don't expect it to survive in Tx.
--
frater mus
Adequate Mousetrap Brewhouse
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Reply to
Frater Mus
Yeah but from what I've learned in another newsgroup its the beginning of the pot planting season. I've heard those flower tops make a wonderful adjunct to a batch of home brew - can't testify to that myself but thought I'd pass that along...
Reply to
AL

But interestingly, there are Canadian homebrewers looking for hop rhizomes and they can't seem to get them; probably because they haven't been able to be harvested yet. And of course I don't track the weather everywhere; I just know that for many homebrewers' locations, time is _starting_ to get short -- at least for ordering them from commercial sources because we're getting lots of reports that many sources are out of stock already. Here in Arkansas, I have some hop bines that are 7' tall now, so we are well beyond the start of planting, and the way our weather is here, if a brewer plants rhizomes three weeks from now, they might very well need to struggle a bit. My point is that if anyone is considering planting hops this year, I wouldn't wait any time at all to order the rhizomes (and by the way, I don't see them; I give them away for free).
Cheers.
Bill Velek, www.tinyurl.com/BVELEK => to my following homebrewer sites: Grow-Hops: Homebrewer's Garden: hops/barley/herbs, with 2,800+ members! BrewEquip: exclusively about brewing equipment, now has 1,200+ members! "Homebrewers" Team donated 216+ YEARS of computing to medical research!
Reply to
Bill Velek
Maybe so re the planting time, but I thought that stuff required higher temps than mere boiling in order to extract the THC; been told that it takes something like three or four hundred degrees. Basically, I've heard that adding it to beer for extra 'kick' is just an urban myth. Never tried it myself, so I have no personal knowledge. Don't know what it does to the quality of beer, either. Seems to me that it might be better to keep them separate; drink your homebrew and smoke a joint.
Speaking of that stuff, you do know that hops is in the same family as cannabus (sp?), don't you. Consequently, there have been a number of efforts to try to graft one onto another -- hops onto maryjane and vice versa. So far no THC in the resulting product.
Cheers.
Bill Velek, www.tinyurl.com/BVELEK => to my following homebrewer sites: Grow-Hops: Homebrewer's Garden: hops/barley/herbs, with 2,800+ members! BrewEquip: exclusively about brewing equipment, now has 1,200+ members! "Homebrewers" Team donated 216+ YEARS of computing to medical research!
Reply to
Bill Velek
[...]
sound advice! from the 70's - God made grass, man made booze - who do YOU trust?
yes
aaawww maaaannn, that's a bummer..
:)
Reply to
AL

I agree, draconian drug laws in the over the past 50 yrs have stifled research with marijuana in the US.
Reply to
barnabyr
It's just Prohibition all over again. What's really crazy is the cost. Here in California we have a budget crisis, which wouldn't exist if we weren't spending more on prisons than on schools. Personally I'd be a lot more upset if my kids started smoking tobacco than if they started smoking marijuana now and then on a weekend.
Reply to
Ben Crowell

taxing legal marijuana would add new revenue to the federal/state/ local government, free up prison space currently filled with non- violent offenders, and reduce drug violence in Mexico. What's not to like?
Roger
Reply to
barnabyr
Free up prison space, yes, reduce violent crime, maybe, but don't count on tax revenue. Pot can grow in nearly any region of the US and since the plant requires no particular processing before use, folks would just grow it at home along with their garden or house plants. There are more reasonable arguments in favor of decriminalizing than here are in favor of outlawing it, but using the tax revenue argument isn't very persuasive. Take us for example, we brew our own beer and are allowed to do so by law up to certain generous quantities so other than the sales tax we might pay for some of the ingredients and equipment there are no tax revenues on our home brew/wine. I'm curious - has anyone here ever been "audited" on their homebrewing?
Reply to
AL

Way less than 1% of the beer drunk in the US is home-brewed and escapes taxation. So, I would say that the tax on beer is pretty effective
Roger
using the tax revenue argument isn't very
Reply to
barnabyr

I can't see the effort of sticking seeds in a garden bed or house planter being comparable to the effort of making even the simplest kit beer. So I would suspect way more than 1% of the pot smoked would be home-grown as compared to home-brew consumption, especially if the taxation drove the pot price to cigarette levels. I just don't see the tax revenue argument holding water.
FWIW - bottom posting makes better usenet threads
Reply to
AL

Ever hear of home-grown tobacco? Most of the price of cigarettes is tax, but I've never heard of anyone resorting to growing their own
Roger
Reply to
barnabyr

snipped-for-privacy@ureach.com writes:
I suspect the vast majority of people are simply wayyyy to lazy to grow their own if the store-bought price is anywhere near reasonable....
-Miles
--
Cynic, n. A blackguard whose faulty vision sees things as they are, not as
they ought to be. Hence the custom among the Scythians of plucking out a
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Reply to
Miles Bader

For good reasons, primarily due to the climate, soil, space and labor requirements - or simply put, inconvenience. Raising tobacco is like farming, raising pot is like keeping house plants. Tobacco isn't exactly ready for use at cutting time, consider more space and appropriate environment for proper curing. Several steps are required to bring a tobacco plant to the finished product. Pot is ready to use as soon as a few leaves, or buds, are plucked & dried.
I'm not saying NO ONE would buy pot, but to argue that it will generate appreciable tax revenues, when growing the stuff at home is SO easy, is just not going to fly.
Reply to
AL
I remember a friend in college that freaked us out by making and drinking too much pot tea. It was the only time I ever saw someone pass out from excess on that stuff. So I suspect boiling does it OK.
Reply to
Bob F

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