Good Eats


Did anyone catch the beer making episode of Alton Brown's GOOD EATS on the
Food Network?
He made it look pretty easy and it made me think I should try my first
batch?
Did he miss any points?
Thanks
Reply to
Brian Foster
Saw that episode and thought it was pretty good. There were some things he did/said (such as adding ice to cool the wort down) that made me (and others, I am sure) shake my head in surprise. However, it wasn't bad overall.
I would not use that episode as an instructional video, however. While he did outline the basic steps, I would also buy a good homebrewing book and do some reading before you give it a shot. "The New Complete Joy of Homebrewing" by Charlie Papazian comes to mind. I am not saying it's the only or the best one around, but it's what I got started on.
Enjoy.
Reply to
Glenn L.
I have seen that episode a few times. One thing I have a problem with is that he leaves the grains in the pot when he does the boil. This can give you a real astrigent off flavor in your finished beer. The show does give you a good idea of the basics. Another good suggestion would be to get the book "The Complete Joy of Homebrewing" by Charlie Papazian. Hope you decide to take up the hobbie. It can be rewarding and fun. Cheers,
Reply to
DragonTail281
If you want to get into all-grain homebrewing, then the above mentioded Charlie Papazian's book is probably a good choice. Another one would be to go to
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and read from there (or better yet, get the new edition as a book).
On the other hand if you want to start off easy and with as little equipment as possible, which is with beer kits, you should also check
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and
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(section "No-boil beer kits").
Reply to
hevimees
Yep! It's a pretty good episode. The homebrewing purist have a lot of problems with it, including some of his vocabulary and technique.
It absolutely IS EASY! That's the good thing about that episode. From reports in these brewing newsgroups, that espisode has started a lot of people homebrewing! Just check out
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for an excellent on-line book. You can also buy the newer edition of that book.
He mentions "all-grain" brewing, which you can advance to later, if you find you like the hobby. You can make homebrewing as easy or as hard as you want it to be!
Not really. He stresses sanitization, which is very important in the later stages of brewing. Most folks don't use ice to chill the hot wort (commercial ice is thought to contain unwanted bacteria), but instead use a "chiller" or just cold water. Also, most don't leave the specialty grains in the boil pot during the boil, that is thought to make the beer too "astringent." But the bottom line is to get started and then you can try it yourself every different way you feel like!
Derric
Reply to
Derric
I didn't see the show, but agree with the comments. I'll add to the list of books to get a hold of, but instead of a book take a look at
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and listen to the weekly podcasts and the videos available on that site. Jim Spencer does a great job on that show.
Another broadcast on the net is from the BrewCasters.
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Download from the archives.
Reply to
mike vore
I have seen the episode of Good Eats Called Amber Waves were Alton showed how to brew beer many times now. It’s probably not the best way to brew beer but for my first batch following the recipe Good Brew to a tee, I even left the specialty grains in the wort, because I did not know better then, it still turned out really good. The ice did not cool the wort enough to pitch the yeast like he said. However, That was just over a year and a half a go and at back in June I found a couple of bottles of that batch and tried them they did taste just as good as the several batches of beer that I have brewed since then. You can get the recipe from the Food Network I would say try it; it is worth a try it’s an ok Amber ale. Here is the link to the recipe
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,1977,FOOD_9936_20302,00.html.
Reply to
zweasel
I saw the same episode. Brown made it look so easy that it inspired me to begin brewing too. That was back in July and I have not stopped since. New Kegerator (Used, just new to me) $200 Ferment Fridge & Temp Control $55 & swap old golf equipment Wort Chiller $65 Assorted Brewing equipment $135
Having great quality draft beer around the house whenever you want it: Priceless
Seroiusly, anyone can get involved in this for a lot less than the cost of a new set of golf clubs...
Reply to
Brian Foster
I was wondering about using Ice to cool the wort, makes since, and it worked for me.
Reply to
dave
Same story for me. I'm an avid cook and love tinkering around in my kitchen. I've always been dimly aware of the possibility of home brewing but never really thought about it much. (Strange given my affinity for both cooking and great beer.) Alton Brown's homebrew episode made the light go on for some reason...I had no idea it could be so easy, fun, and affordable.
I'm fermenting my fourth batch in now....mostly extract brewing + steeping some specialty grains and adjuncts to improve the finished product. My 1st was an amber ale, the 2nd was a Dunklewiessen the 3rd was a Holiday spiced ale (which I just finished bottling and will gift out over the holidays) and I've got a 4th in the secondary....a Belgian Wit that is testing my patience. Along with a few neighbors who are in awe of how good a homebrew can actually be.....I'm completely hooked. I've got multiple requests for a Sam's Summer Clone which I'll likely try in the spring......meanwhile the weather here in New England has me thinking along the lines of hearty winter ales and a good Barleywine......with maybe a lager along the way since I've got a nice cool basement now.
Oh yeah......I'm an avid Sake fan as well......so a batch of Sake is on the list but may need to wait till spring as the ferment temps are a bit high.
Great hobby which I highly recommend!!
Reply to
Anatabaka

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