Pu-erh tea preparation


Hello --
I've got hold of some 'pu-erh yunnan tea' - how does one infuse etc ? Presumably they can be steeped multiple times ?
--
regards, chris
Reply to
Chris Stiles
Chris snipped-for-privacy@random-node.example.org10/31/03 19: snipped-for-privacy@example.org
Chris,
Assuming this is an oxydized pu-erh, and we can probably say that, use water right off the boil, do a quick rinse of the leaves -- that is, quickly pour off the first steep down the drain -- and brew as long as you will until the flavor and aroma are right for you, in other words, to your taste. Pu-erhs are among my personal favorites. Note the "earthiness" of the tea; it's a good thing. As for amount of leaf, that's basically up to you, but I usually give it somewhat more than half the number of grams as there are ounces of water. Experiment. I like my pu-erhs on the strong side, but not everyone does. Hope this helps a little.
Michael
Reply to
Michael Plant
Michael Plant writes:
Hi Michael --
Actually its moulded - in the form of mini 'tau-chas' (sp?) wrapped in tissue paper.
I presume boiling water still though. Is this a tea that can be infused multiple times ?
--
regards, chris
Reply to
Chris Stiles
Chris Stiles writes:
That would be tuochas, I think.
Yes yes yes!
/Lew
--
Lew Perin / perin@acm.org
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
Reply to
Lewis Perin
Chris snipped-for-privacy@random-node.example.org11/3/03 10: snipped-for-privacy@example.org
Good. Makes things simple. Just figure your mini tuo-cha thing will serve for a cup's worth, and yes, by all means steep multiple times. If you like it, you'll want to graduate away from mini t-c's to loose leaf or bigger pu-erh cow pies. (Figuratively speaking, I hasten to add.)
Michael
Reply to
Michael Plant
You probably already know this but you should remove the paper before steeping.
(I wasn't sure when I saw my first mini) --Tom -oo- ""\o~ ------------------------------------ "Homo sum, humani nil a me alienum puto." Terrance
Reply to
Tom
Michael Plant writes:
Great. Thanks for the help. I saw some bigger pu-erh nests when I was at one of the Whittards Tea Zones over the weekend, so I'll pick some up on a return visit. It does indeed have a nice earthy taste.
BTW, does anyone know what do they use to mould the tea together ? I saw the legend 'contains animal product' on the side of the boxes containing the larger nests [which interestingly looked as if they had been imported directly from china, rather than being branded specially for Whittard].
--
regards, chris
Reply to
Chris Stiles

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