Ata Rangi

So, after babbling about Pinot and Ata Rangi, pulled last bottle of 2008 vintage from cellar.
With rosemary and garlic seasoning, roast lamb, potato, butternut and broccoli. Apple crumble dessert followed.
2008 Ata Rangi Pinot Noir, Martinborough. 13.5% Screw Cap. Deep dark red ( a characteristic of Martinborough IMO ) no age, rather muted nose. Soft entry but gained power and expression over time in glass. Good acidity cut with the lamb. ( Maybe Prof Lipton can explain the oleo~stearic fat differences between beef and lamb? ) Palate: earth, black cherry some earth, Alive and well but past best on this bottle.
Stemware: don't recall discussion on the NG about merits of various brands. I have Riedel, Schott Zwiesel but for this, first use of recent purchase of Zalto Universals. New to NZ but a favourite with some Aussie drinkers. Need to use a few times to get a feel for these, but notice in myself and others a certain reluctance to swirl and aerate in glass. The stems are so thin you think it may snap, and the bowl and wine are going to end in your lap.
Reply to
greybeard
> So, after babbling about Pinot and Ata Rangi, > pulled last bottle of 2008 vintage from cellar. > > With rosemary and garlic seasoning, roast lamb, potato, butternut > and broccoli. Apple crumble dessert followed. > > 2008 Ata Rangi Pinot Noir, Martinborough. 13.5% Screw Cap. > Deep dark red ( a characteristic of Martinborough IMO ) no age, > rather muted nose. Soft entry but gained power and expression over > time in glass. Good acidity cut with the lamb. ( Maybe Prof Lipton > can explain the oleo~stearic fat differences between beef and lamb? ) > Palate: earth, black cherry some earth, Alive and well but past best > on this bottle. > > Stemware: don't recall discussion on the NG about merits of various > brands. I have Riedel, Schott Zwiesel but for this, first use of recent > purchase of Zalto Universals. New to NZ but a favourite with some > Aussie drinkers. Need to use a few times to get a feel for these, but > notice in myself and others a certain reluctance to swirl and aerate > in glass. The stems are so thin you think it may snap, and the bowl > and wine are going to end in your lap.
Thanks for the note. I've only had Ata Rangi once, but quite liked. I should love for more- looks like 2016 available several places near me.
I use the Zalto Universals more than any other (well, maybe about same as Gabriel Glas Gold). They are handblown so despite being very thin are generally stronger than machine made (machines make stem and bowl separately and then attach, that's the weak spot). And I use dishwasher- it's safer!
Reply to
DaleW
> So, after babbling about Pinot and Ata Rangi, > pulled last bottle of 2008 vintage from cellar. > > With rosemary and garlic seasoning, roast lamb, potato, butternut > and broccoli. Apple crumble dessert followed. > > 2008 Ata Rangi Pinot Noir, Martinborough. 13.5% Screw Cap. > Deep dark red ( a characteristic of Martinborough IMO ) no age, > rather muted nose. Soft entry but gained power and expression over > time in glass. Good acidity cut with the lamb. ( Maybe Prof Lipton > can explain the oleo~stearic fat differences between beef and lamb? ) > Palate: earth, black cherry some earth, Alive and well but past best > on this bottle. Compared to beef, lamb has more conjugated linoleic acids (CLAs) but damned if I know how that would affect the flavor of wine. As an aside, despite my hearing many positive comments about Ata Rangi, two visits there (in '01 and again in '12) left me unconvinced. On the first occasion, my opinion was no doubt colored by the inability of the server to understand that the wine she was pouring was horribly corked (!!) I am generally well disposed to Martinborough Pinot Noirs, so it was surprising to me that I wasn't more taken with the wines of Ata Rangi. > > Stemware: don't recall discussion on the NG about merits of various > brands. I have Riedel, Schott Zwiesel but for this, first use of recent > purchase of Zalto Universals. New to NZ but a favourite with some > Aussie drinkers. Need to use a few times to get a feel for these, but > notice in myself and others a certain reluctance to swirl and aerate > in glass. The stems are so thin you think it may snap, and the bowl > and wine are going to end in your lap.
Echoing what Dale said, I've found the Zaltos to be quite sturdy given their very delicate appearance.
Mark Lipton
-- alt.food.wine FAQ: RIP cwdjrx
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alt.food.wine FAQ:  RIP cwdjrx
Reply to
Mark Lipton
> So, after babbling about Pinot and Ata Rangi, > pulled last bottle of 2008 vintage from cellar. > > With rosemary and garlic seasoning, roast lamb, potato, butternut > and broccoli. Apple crumble dessert followed. > > 2008 Ata Rangi Pinot Noir, Martinborough. 13.5% Screw Cap. > Deep dark red ( a characteristic of Martinborough IMO ) no age, > rather muted nose. Soft entry but gained power and expression over > time in glass. Good acidity cut with the lamb. ( Maybe Prof Lipton > can explain the oleo~stearic fat differences between beef and lamb? ) > Palate: earth, black cherry some earth, Alive and well but past best > on this bottle. > > Stemware: don't recall discussion on the NG about merits of various > brands. I have Riedel, Schott Zwiesel but for this, first use of recent > purchase of Zalto Universals. New to NZ but a favourite with some > Aussie drinkers. Need to use a few times to get a feel for these, but > notice in myself and others a certain reluctance to swirl and aerate > in glass. The stems are so thin you think it may snap, and the bowl > and wine are going to end in your lap.
stems: I was given a set of Luminarc stemware about thirty years ago. They must be pretty tough because I've managed to keep them intact!
Dan-O (with the butterfingers)
Reply to
Dan the Man

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