I usually avoid "this critic is imcompetent" posts, but....


I just got the new Wine Spectator (hey, don't yell at me, I don't pay for it, Zachys does). So I'm flipping through, paying more attention to the flops than the supposed winners. James Laube's worst wine in the CA Cabernet & Blends category this isssue is the 2001 Havens Bourriquot. "67: Dense and leathery, with more earth and barnyard flavors than fruit, tasted twice, consistent notes "
Ok, so that doesn't jibe with my experience. This is a wine I really loved. In general disagreeing with critics doesn't bother me. But 67 points? Barnyard flavors? This may not be the most fruit-forward of CA reds, but there's a good backbone of fruit there.
Laube seems to lately be going out if his way to pick fights- the WS consistently awards 80-84 pts to pure dreck, and then Laube gives scores in the 60s to Montelena,etc.
I've poured the '01 Bourriquot (oneof the few CA wines I've bought by the case) several times to some friends, some of whom are quite "fruit-friendly." No one has ever not thought it lovely. I'd love it if anyone else who has tasted this wine would post comments.
Dale
Reply to
DaleW

Its an old tune, Dale--low scores for great wineries. Years ago they gave a Bruno Giacosa Barbaresco I forget which bottling a 66. Just waking up in the morning, Bruno G gets a 66, when gets up add 10 points, add another 10 if he goes near a vat......... Just part of the hype. Don't you know it was Laube's bad reviews that caused the Mondavis to deconstruct. You quote Laube's review, what about one of Marvin's celeb pals like Rusty Staub, Harold Prince or Chico "Beisbol been good to me" Escuela.
Reply to
Joseph B. Rosenberg

I have not had this, but RP has:
90 Points - Robert Parker (Wine Advocate) "The 2001 Bourriquot is a dead-ringer for a St.-Emilion, not surprising in view of its blend of 62% Cabernet Franc and 38% Merlot. A deep ruby/purple color is accompanied by sweet scents of tobacco, spice box, menthol, and black fruits. Reminiscent of a Chateau Figeac or Cheval Blanc, but clearly made with ripe California fruit, it still has some tannin to shed, so give it 2-3 years of cellaring, and drink it over the following 10-15. This is a stylish, provocative effort."
Reply to
EMRinVT

In article , snipped-for-privacy@aol.com says...
As long as we're talking about Robert Parker and reviews, has anyone tried the most recent vintage of Patrick Jasmin Cote Rotie? My wine seller pulled a $50 bottle of it off the shelf (two actually, since the first one was corked) to let a few of us taste it so he could mock Parker's review. He said Parker gave it a glowing review (if someone could double check that, I'd appreciate it) but the taste obviously wasn't there. He described it as very thin. A veteran wine drinker described it as a good $20 Rhone. I didn't taste much of anything. He seemed to think Parker doesn't taste all the wines he says he does, often going by what the winemaker tells him. He also offered out that what wine critics taste are special bottles, not what's sold to the public.
Reply to
Steve Timko

Parker tastes blind, either at home or in country--I believe he both visits the winery and has wines sent to his local residence to taste. He may taste a wine two or three times and no winery owner can change his mind.
I'll bet that he tasted this wine in the Rhone not out of "special cask" he's been there, done, that in his early days. Somewhere between the winery and the local wholesaler, somebody screwed up. Shit happens, the wine stays too long on someone's loading dock, the importer cutting corners does not ship the wine in temperature resistant containers ie "reefers". Someone's warehouse is not air conditioned. If you got his address & wrote him a note--he may go to a local shop, plunk his money down & retaste. Why don't you go his free website and nose around the wine talk site. Believe me if there was major damage one of the posters would mention it. Do a search on the site & see if someone posted tasting notes. You may have to register to do a search but cruising the Squires site is free, but the access to the archives of RP's notes cost money.
If your retailer thinks Parker can be influenced or is faking, he ought to check the temperature of his own storage. Putting a bottle in the window or near the heater doesn't help it---many stores like to show off their "gems" and in doing so, alter the taste. It all sounds like sour grapes to me.
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Reply to
Joseph B. Rosenberg


If you call a score of "(87-89?)" and a wording like "Unfortunately, the acidity sticks out like a sore thumb. If it becomes better integrated, this effort [Côte Rôtie 2003, M. P.] will merit a score in the high eighties"*) a "glowing review", then we're with you.
Thus said, I am 100% with Beppe Rosenberg: Seems very much like sour grapes to me.
*) TWA 156, December 2004, p. 25.
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay

In article , snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net says...
Glowing review is my term and likely an embellishment on what the wine seller said. He said Parker described it as one of the better examples of the wine, or words to that affect. The point is, Parker gave it a positive review. The bottles he had didn't merit it and we could taste it.. I guess that doesn't indict all of the bottles. He's also what Parker would describe as an acid head or acid freak, whatever Parker's term is. So I think there's a difference of opinion there, since Parker is more towards the high-alcohol/fruit end of the spectrum. The place is dimly lit and he's quite meticulous about how he cares for his wine, from what I can tell. As good as any wine shop I've been in. Plus, he carries a $40 bottle of Chablis from an importer named Rosenberg. That shows some good wine sense, doesn't it?
Reply to
Steve Timko


Before we go into detail about Parkers likes, dislikes, and tasting abilities: could you check whether we are taking about the same vintage (2003) of the Patrick Jasmin Côte Rôtie or not?
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay

And how can you taste "blind" during a visit to the winery? If he goes to Chateau X, do you think at the "blind" tasting they will pour something from Chateau Z?
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Reply to
Leo Bueno

My experiences with the Parker tastings are limited to the following:
On 3 occasions, I have seen Rogavani taste and note every wine in his article.
Pretty much annually, Parker has an article on CA Cab barrell samples. This comes out after the Addy Bassin barrell sampling in wash DC. The wine makers, etc at the barrell sampling state that they have set up the rp tasting earlier in the week.
Around 1990, as I recall, RP was thrown out of Burgundy for claiming that the cellar offerings were not the same as the bottles that hit USA. There were no burgundy reviews for a number of years, and parker still does not review personally Burgundy.
I do not necessarily agree with many of parker's taste, but I do not question his integrity.
I am a veteran wine drinker(sure does not take much to make that claim), and I think most Cote Rotie have been badly overpriced for the past 20 years. Most bring over $50, and most taste to me like a good $20 Rhone. RP gave the wine a very mixed review, and I think your experts do not know the difference between too much acid(RP) and very thin.
Reply to
gerald

In article , snipped-for-privacy@slaweck.bz says...
I don't myself, no, but I'm poretty comfortable saying he does. I'm waiting to confirm the vintage before going any further. I've also signed up for the Mark Squires bulletin board and I'll pursue the issue there, as well, although perhaps without lobbing hand grenades at Parker. I still trust Parker. And believe me, I emphathize with a critic who just by doing his job is going to tick off people and perhaps create conspiracy theories about how he reaches his decisions. But the dude can't bat a thousand. From what I can tell so far, this wine doesn't merit praise. I'm curious about how a wine that tsstes like that gets praise. On the other hand, the 2003 Guigal Cotes du Rhone rated by Parker in the high 80s that I opened last night is a wonderful wine. I don't know how much of it is from a roasted slope Syrah, but I think most people would pick it over that Cote Rotie in a blind taste tasting. It was $10.
Reply to
Steve Timko

[] ] On the other hand, the 2003 Guigal Cotes du Rhone rated by Parker in the ] high 80s that I opened last night is a wonderful wine. I don't know how ] much of it is from a roasted slope Syrah, but I think most people would
Almost certainly none.
] pick it over that Cote Rotie in a blind taste tasting. It was $10.
Although I haven't tasted the Cote Rotie in question, what you say is probably true for any C-R in its youth, even the greatest. You're comparing a wine made to be friendly young to one that takes years to become approachable.
-E
Reply to
Emery Davis

Okay, my bad. I checked last night and it appears we are discussing the 2001 Patrick Jasmin Cote Rotie. Okay, so I was only off two years. Does anyone have access to this review? As long as I'm making corrections, I said in an earlier post that Parker described a Hansel Three Rows pinot noir as tasting like a Romanee Conti. Actually, he said it had a bouquet like a Romanee Conti.
Reply to
stephentimko


| The 2001 Côte Rôtie's deep ruby color is accompanied by | explosive aromas of of sweet raspberry fruit intermingled with a | hint of apricots (7-8% Viognier is added to the blend). | Well-delineated and floral, with a cherry/raspberry fruit | component beautifully displayed, this medium-bodied 2001 is not | a blockbuster, but it wins the taster over with its delicacy and | Finesse. Anticipated maturity: 2004-2012. | (90-92)
(TWA 147, Closing date 2003-06-30, p. 13.)
M.
Reply to
Michael Pronay

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