Milk products in sparkling wine?

Hi,
I recently came across a bottle of Queen Adelaide, a sparkling wine from Australia. Nice, palatable, fine mousseux... and an intriguing back label saying that "milk products" had been used in the elaboration of this sparkler. I could not find a specific "milky" smell or taste in the product, although some kind of unusual "froth" seemed to glide along the glass. A few questions to the illuminati among you:
- am I right in assuming that the presence of "milk products" is in no way linked to a possible malolactic fermentation?
- why would a wine maker add "milk products"?
- is this common practice and/or legal in major Champagne/Crémant/Sekt/Cava/SparklingWine producing countries?
Looking forward to your replies, I'll have another milk-shake, thanks
Yves
Reply to
Yves Tychon
>- am I right in assuming that the presence of "milk products" is in no way >linked to a possible malolactic fermentation? yes >- why would a wine maker add "milk products"? milk can be used for fining >- is this common practice and/or legal in major >Champagne/Crémant/Sekt/Cava/SparklingWine producing countries?
no idea about how legal or common it is
-- Steve Slatcher
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Steve Slatcher
http://pobox.com/~steve.slatcher
Reply to
Steve Slatcher
This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------=_NextPart_000_0033_01C4CAEF.2B390C50 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="Windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable "Yves Tychon" wrote in message = news:419761c1@news.vo.lu... > Hi, >=20 > I recently came across a bottle of Queen Adelaide, a sparkling wine = from > Australia. Nice, palatable, fine mousseux... and an intriguing back = label > saying that "milk products" had been used in the elaboration of this > sparkler. I could not find a specific "milky" smell or taste in the = product, > although some kind of unusual "froth" seemed to glide along the glass. = A few > questions to the illuminati among you: >=20 > - am I right in assuming that the presence of "milk products" is in no = way > linked to a possible malolactic fermentation? >=20 > - why would a wine maker add "milk products"? >=20 > - is this common practice and/or legal in major > Champagne/Cr=E9mant/Sekt/Cava/SparklingWine producing countries? >=20 > Looking forward to your replies, I'll have another milk-shake, thanks >=20 > Yves
Just sent out this piece by email yesterday I've used rich text as = related sites are embedded. Cheers! Martin
What's in Australian wine?
Are consumers well-served by Australian wine labelling? Probably not. In = an era of legally enforced truth in labelling you can still find = Australian wine for sale with labels alleging that the contents are = 'champagne', 'white burgundy', 'port', 'sherry', 'tokay' etc.
=20
Yes these labels are gradually and I suspect reluctantly being phased = out but local winemakers have ridden on the back of European = geographical nomenclature for over a century, happily foisting misnamed = wines on an unsuspecting public. I won't even mention the millions of = litres of wine made from sultana juice, legally but misleadingly sold as = cask 'riesling' until very recently.
=20
But consumers are becoming more educated about food and beverages and = they are encouraged in this by media stories about health problems such = as cancer and allergenic reactions - rightly or wrongly attributed to = chemicals and additives introduced to the food chain. Consequently, one = has only to walk down a retail aisle to see shoppers peering at product = labels proclaiming 'Fat-free' 'GMO-free' 'No salt' 'No preservatives = added' and so forth.
=20
And wine consumers concerned about food purity may be surprised to learn = that most wine does not consist solely of the fermented juice of fresh = ripe grapes. In fact, Australian wine law permits the use of over 50 = additives and processing aids in winemaking. Permitted animal products = used include collagen, egg white, enzymes, gelatine, isinglass, = lysozyme, milk and milk products. (Source, Food Standards Australia New = Zealand.)
=20
Most of these chemicals/additives do not have to be listed on labels but = if they are, the ingredients are rarely spelt out in plain English, = marketers preferring to use cryptic code numbers that are = incomprehensible to many.
=20
Newish wine labelling laws concerning allergens will indicate the = presence of some additives but a significant and increasing number of = consumers maintain diets that prohibit consumption of products that = contain certain additives, or that contain or may have contained animal = products.
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  "Yves Tychon" <tychonNOSPAM@pt.lu> = wrote in=20 message news:419761c1@news.vo.lu...
a bottle of Queen Adelaide, a sparkling wine from> Australia. = Nice,=20 palatable, fine mousseux... and an intriguing back label> saying = that=20 "milk products" had been used in the elaboration of this> = sparkler. I=20 could not find a specific "milky" smell or taste in the product,> =
although some kind of unusual "froth" seemed to glide along the glass. A =
few> questions to the illuminati among you:> > - am = I right=20 in assuming that the presence of "milk products" is in no way> = linked to=20 a possible malolactic fermentation?> > - why would a wine = maker=20 add "milk products"?> > - is this common practice and/or = legal in=20 major> Champagne/Cr=E9mant/Sekt/Cava/SparklingWine producing=20 countries?> > Looking forward to your replies, I'll have = another=20 milk-shake, thanks> > Yves Just sent out this piece by email = yesterday I've=20 used rich text as related sites are embedded. Cheers! Martin  
What's in =
Australian wine? Are consumers well-served = by=20 Australian wine labelling? Probably not. In an era of legally enforced = truth in=20 labelling you can still find Australian wine for sale with labels = alleging that=20 the contents are 'champagne', 'white burgundy', 'port', 'sherry', = 'tokay'=20 etc.   Yes these labels are = gradually and I=20 suspect reluctantly being phased out but local winemakers have ridden on = the=20 back of European geographical nomenclature for over a century, happily = foisting=20 misnamed wines on an unsuspecting public. I won't even mention the = millions of=20 litres of wine made from sultana juice, legally but misleadingly sold as = cask=20 'riesling' until very recently.   But consumers are becoming = more=20 educated about food and beverages and they are encouraged in this by = media=20 stories about health problems such as cancer and allergenic reactions - = rightly=20 or wrongly attributed to chemicals and additives introduced to the food = chain.=20 Consequently, one has only to walk down a retail aisle to see shoppers = peering=20 at product labels proclaiming 'Fat-free' 'GMO-free' 'No salt' 'No = preservatives=20 added' and so forth.   And wine consumers = concerned about=20 food purity may be surprised to learn that most wine does not consist = solely of=20 the fermented juice of fresh ripe grapes. In fact, Australian wine law = permits=20 the use of over 50 additives and processing aids in winemaking. = Permitted animal=20 products used include collagen, egg white, enzymes, = gelatine, isinglass, lysozyme, milk and milk products. = (Source,=20 Food Standards Australia New Zealand.)   Most of these = chemicals/additives do=20 not have to be listed on labels but if they are, the ingredients are = rarely=20 spelt out in plain English, marketers preferring to use cryptic code = numbers=20 that are incomprehensible to many.   Newish wine labelling laws = concerning=20 allergens will indicate the presence = of some=20 additives but a significant and increasing number of consumers maintain = diets=20 that prohibit consumption of products that contain certain additives, or = that=20 contain or may have contained animal=20 products.
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Reply to
Martin Field
This is a multi-part message in MIME format. ------=_NextPart_000_0060_01C4CAFA.2458CA50 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="Windows-1252" Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable "Martin Field" wrote in = message news:7kQld.644$Rb.26107@nnrp1.ozemail.com.au... "Yves Tychon" wrote in message = news:419761c1@news.vo.lu... > Hi, >=20 > I recently came across a bottle of Queen Adelaide, a sparkling wine = from > Australia. Nice, palatable, fine mousseux... and an intriguing back = label > saying that "milk products" had been used in the elaboration of this > sparkler. I could not find a specific "milky" smell or taste in the = product, > although some kind of unusual "froth" seemed to glide along the = glass. A few > questions to the illuminati among you: >=20 > - am I right in assuming that the presence of "milk products" is in = no way > linked to a possible malolactic fermentation? >=20 > - why would a wine maker add "milk products"? >=20 > - is this common practice and/or legal in major > Champagne/Cr=E9mant/Sekt/Cava/SparklingWine producing countries? >=20 > Looking forward to your replies, I'll have another milk-shake, = thanks >=20 > Yves
Just sent out this piece by email yesterday I've used rich text as = related sites are embedded. Cheers! Martin
What's in Australian wine?
Are consumers well-served by Australian wine labelling? Probably not. = In an era of legally enforced truth in labelling you can still find = Australian wine for sale with labels alleging that the contents are = 'champagne', 'white burgundy', 'port', 'sherry', 'tokay' etc.
=20
Yes these labels are gradually and I suspect reluctantly being phased = out but local winemakers have ridden on the back of European = geographical nomenclature for over a century, happily foisting misnamed = wines on an unsuspecting public. I won't even mention the millions of = litres of wine made from sultana juice, legally but misleadingly sold as = cask 'riesling' until very recently.
=20
But consumers are becoming more educated about food and beverages and = they are encouraged in this by media stories about health problems such = as cancer and allergenic reactions - rightly or wrongly attributed to = chemicals and additives introduced to the food chain. Consequently, one = has only to walk down a retail aisle to see shoppers peering at product = labels proclaiming 'Fat-free' 'GMO-free' 'No salt' 'No preservatives = added' and so forth.
=20
And wine consumers concerned about food purity may be surprised to = learn that most wine does not consist solely of the fermented juice of = fresh ripe grapes. In fact, Australian wine law permits the use of over = 50 additives and processing aids in winemaking. Permitted animal = products used include collagen, egg white, enzymes, gelatine, isinglass, = lysozyme, milk and milk products. (Source, Food Standards Australia New = Zealand.)
=20
Most of these chemicals/additives do not have to be listed on labels = but if they are, the ingredients are rarely spelt out in plain English, = marketers preferring to use cryptic code numbers that are = incomprehensible to many.
=20
Newish wine labelling laws concerning allergens will indicate the = presence of some additives but a significant and increasing number of = consumers maintain diets that prohibit consumption of products that = contain certain additives, or that contain or may have contained animal = products.
Fining products don't really remain in the product, although there's = always a small chance that traces will remain. I know one (excellent) = winemaker who tends not to fine his wines these days, not because he = prefers it that way but because some people get scared or confused by = references on the label to egg white.
Kieran
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"Martin Field" <martenospam@notspam= ozemail.spamcom.au>=20 6107@nnrp1.ozemail.com.au...   "Yves Tychon" <tychonNOSPAM@pt.lu> wrote in=20 message news:419761c1@news.vo.lu...
recently came=20 across a bottle of Queen Adelaide, a sparkling wine from> = Australia.=20 Nice, palatable, fine mousseux... and an intriguing back label> = saying=20 that "milk products" had been used in the elaboration of this>=20 sparkler. I could not find a specific "milky" smell or taste in the=20 product,> although some kind of unusual "froth" seemed to glide = along=20 the glass. A few> questions to the illuminati among = you:>=20
is in=20 no way> linked to a possible malolactic fermentation?> =
this=20 common practice and/or legal in major>=20 Champagne/Cr=E9mant/Sekt/Cava/SparklingWine producing = countries?>=20
milk-shake,=20 thanks> > Yves Just sent out this piece by email = yesterday=20 I've used rich text as related sites are embedded. Cheers! Martin  
What's = in=20 Australian wine? Are consumers = well-served by=20 Australian wine labelling? Probably not. In an era of legally enforced = truth=20 in labelling you can still find Australian wine for sale with labels = alleging=20 that the contents are 'champagne', 'white burgundy', 'port', 'sherry', = 'tokay'=20 etc.   Yes these labels are = gradually and I=20 suspect reluctantly being phased out but local winemakers have ridden = on the=20 back of European geographical nomenclature for over a century, happily =
foisting misnamed wines on an unsuspecting public. I won't even = mention the=20 millions of litres of wine made from sultana juice, legally but = misleadingly=20 sold as cask 'riesling' until very = recently.   But consumers are = becoming more=20 educated about food and beverages and they are encouraged in this by = media=20 stories about health problems such as cancer and allergenic reactions = -=20 rightly or wrongly attributed to chemicals and additives introduced to = the=20 food chain. Consequently, one has only to walk down a retail aisle to = see=20 shoppers peering at product labels proclaiming 'Fat-free' 'GMO-free' = 'No salt'=20 'No preservatives added' and so forth.   And wine consumers = concerned about=20 food purity may be surprised to learn that most wine does not consist = solely=20 of the fermented juice of fresh ripe grapes. In fact, Australian wine = law=20 permits the use of over 50 additives and processing aids in = winemaking.=20 Permitted animal products used include collagen, egg white, enzymes, = gelatine, isinglass, lysozyme, milk and milk products. = (Source,=20 Food Standards Australia New Zealand.)   Most of these = chemicals/additives do=20 not have to be listed on labels but if they are, the ingredients are = rarely=20 spelt out in plain English, marketers preferring to use cryptic code = numbers=20 that are incomprehensible to many.   Newish wine labelling = laws=20 concerning allergens will indicate the = presence of some=20 additives but a significant and increasing number of consumers = maintain diets=20 that prohibit consumption of products that contain certain additives, = or that=20 contain or may have contained animal products.   Fining=20 products don't really remain in the product, although there's always a = small=20 chance that traces will remain. I know one (excellent) winemaker who = tends not=20 to fine his wines these days, not because he prefers it that way but = because=20 some people get scared or confused by references on the label to egg=20 white.   Kieran
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Reply to
Kieran Dyke
> Hi, > > Australia. Nice, palatable, fine mousseux... and an intriguing back label > saying that "milk products" had been used in the elaboration of this > - why would a wine maker add "milk products"? > - is this common practice and/or legal in major > Champagne/Crémant/Sekt/Cava/SparklingWine producing countries?
Yves,
Skim milk (or casein) is a fining agent. It is used to remove phenolic compounds from the wine. These may give a harsh or flabby character to the palate, which the winemaker wants to remove. Fining agents are generally insoluble in wine, and they simply strip an undesirable character, then settle to the bottom of the tank as solids.
It is generally believed by winemakers that there are no traces of milk left behind - in particular the proteins that might cause an allergic reaction. However, it is now known that galactose traces remain (milk sugar), and because current analytical methods may not be sophisticated enough to pick up low levels of proteins, the labelling regulations now require it to be mentioned.
It is a very common fining agent, and has been used for many years - the only difference is that the label must now mention it if it was used. Milk is actually fairly innocuous, when you consider that ox blood used to be a common fining agent! Milk is legal in Australia, but I cannot speak for any other countries - I would be surprised if it was illegal though, along with isinglass, gelatine, and other fining agents.
Cheers,
Andrew
Reply to
Andrew L Drumm

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