TN: Wines with bunny (Burg, Loire, Prosecco)


Last night some friends had invited me over for a bunny dinner, since there was a rabbit in mustard sauce recipe in last Wed's NYT. I carried over some open wines from night before as well as a Burg. The fresh wines we tried:
NV Riondo "Pink" Prosecco Crisp, just a touch off-dry, strawberries, not much on finish, but pleasant enough bubbles. B/B-
2007 Clos de la Fine Muscadet Cotes de Grandlieu Limes and saline, a bit thin, but decent flavors. B-
2002 Geantet-Pansiot "Champs Perdrix " Marsannay This is drinking well now, and goes with with the lapin a la moutarde. Black cherries and raspberries, just a whisper of cocoa, ripe fruit but with a good backbone of acidity. Probably would fall on modern end of spectrum, but not overdone or over the top. I really quite enjoy (as do others) B++
Fun night with friends.
Grade disclaimer: I'm a very easy grader, basically A is an excellent wine, B a good wine, C mediocre. Anything below C means I wouldn't drink at a party where it was only choice. Furthermore, I offer no promises of objectivity, accuracy, and certainly not of consistency. =A0
Reply to
DaleW
> > 2002 Geantet-Pansiot "Champs Perdrix " Marsannay > This is drinking well now, and goes with with the lapin a la moutarde. > Black cherries and raspberries, just a whisper of cocoa, ripe fruit > but with a good backbone of acidity. Probably would fall on modern end > of spectrum, but not overdone or over the top. I really quite enjoy > (as do others) B++
I'll have to look for the recipe, but it is a classic of Dijon. For my part, I find that the lapin a la moutarde that I make pairs best with serious Cru Beaujolais. Your Marsannay may not be far removed from that, though.
Mark Lipton
-- alt.food.wine FAQ:
formatting link
--
alt.food.wine FAQ:  http://winefaq.cwdjr.net
Reply to
Mark Lipton

Last night some friends had invited me over for a bunny dinner, since there was a rabbit in mustard sauce recipe in last Wed's NYT. I carried over some open wines from night before as well as a Burg. The fresh wines we tried:
Hi Dale, I saved this recipe when I saw it in the times. How was it? Would you do anything differently from the recipe as presented?
Regards, Jon
Reply to
Zeppo
> "DaleW" wrote in message > > news:53e9d769-7bb4-45a5-8413-1c05c3874f86@k8g2000yqn.googlegroups.com... > Last night some friends had invited me over for a bunny dinner, since > there was a rabbit in mustard sauce recipe in last Wed's NYT. I > carried over some open wines from night before as well as a Burg. The > fresh wines we tried: > > Hi Dale, > I saved this recipe when I saw it in the times. How was it? Would you do > anything differently from the recipe as presented? > > Regards, > Jon
I thought it was a good example, though it wouldn't have bothered me to have left in the creme fraiche as in Boulud's orginal. I love recipes with mustard - mustard can be a wine killer, but with braising or other long cooking methods it is an accent without acridity. Ron did 2 rabbits, and served over pappardelle. He felt it could have been a little more sauce, but I thought fine.
Reply to
DaleW
> "DaleW" wrote in message > > news:53e9d769-7bb4-45a5-8413-1c05c3874f86@k8g2000yqn.googlegroups.com... > Last night some friends had invited me over for a bunny dinner, since > there was a rabbit in mustard sauce recipe in last Wed's NYT. I > carried over some open wines from night before as well as a Burg. The > fresh wines we tried: > > Hi Dale, > I saved this recipe when I saw it in the times. How was it? Would you do > anything differently from the recipe as presented? > > Regards, > Jon
I thought it was a good example, though it wouldn't have bothered me to have left in the creme fraiche as in Boulud's orginal. I love recipes with mustard - mustard can be a wine killer, but with braising or other long cooking methods it is an accent without acridity. Ron did 2 rabbits, and served over pappardelle. He felt it could have been a little more sauce, but I thought fine.
Thanks. Off to find some hare.
Jon
Reply to
Zeppo
> "DaleW" wrote in message >> "DaleW" wrote in message >> >> news:53e9d769-7bb4-45a5-8413-1c05c3874f86@k8g2000yqn.googlegroups.com... >> Last night some friends had invited me over for a bunny dinner, since >> there was a rabbit in mustard sauce recipe in last Wed's NYT. I >> carried over some open wines from night before as well as a Burg. The >> fresh wines we tried: >> >> Hi Dale, >> I saved this recipe when I saw it in the times. How was it? Would you do >> anything differently from the recipe as presented? >> >> Regards, >> Jon > > I thought it was a good example, though it wouldn't have bothered me > to have left in the creme fraiche as in Boulud's orginal. I love > recipes with mustard - mustard can be a wine killer, but with braising > or other long cooking methods it is an accent without acridity. Ron > did 2 rabbits, and served over pappardelle. He felt it could have been > a little more sauce, but I thought fine. > > Thanks. Off to find some hare. >
You probably know this but for the peanut gallery hare and rabbit are not the same thing, nor would they necessarily go with the same wines or preparations. (Though hare with mustard sauce sounds good, too!)
Hare is much gamier and generally calls for a pretty big red, whereas rabbit is very wine versatile, like chicken, depending on the sauce.
There's a hare living somewhere near here I'd like to serve with sauce, or without. He's a whopper, and can strip bark off a tree near waist high.
-E
Reply to
Emery Davis
>> >> I thought it was a good example, though it wouldn't have bothered me >> to have left in the creme fraiche as in Boulud's orginal. I love >> recipes with mustard - mustard can be a wine killer, but with braising >> or other long cooking methods it is an accent without acridity. Ron >> did 2 rabbits, and served over pappardelle. He felt it could have been >> a little more sauce, but I thought fine. >> >> Thanks. Off to find some hare. >> > > You probably know this but for the peanut gallery hare and rabbit are > not the same thing, nor would they necessarily go with the same wines > or preparations. (Though hare with mustard sauce sounds good, too!) > > Hare is much gamier and generally calls for a pretty big red, whereas > rabbit is very wine versatile, like chicken, depending on the sauce. > > There's a hare living somewhere near here I'd like to serve with sauce, > or without. He's a whopper, and can strip bark off a tree near waist > high.
Emery, Actually, I did know that. It was a poor attempt at being witty. A bit too much Two Hands Bella's Garden the night before to pull it off.
Jon
Reply to
Zeppo

DrinksForum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.