What Rush Drinks


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well, you know, H.R. said, "What kind of wine goes with pigs in a blanket?" You people think you can trip me up with these questions. I served an Italian Cabernet last night called Sassicaia. You talk to anybody who knows wine, their tongue is on the floor right now. I had a double magnum of it.
Reply to
Evan Keel

Evan, you did me a great favor. I now know the answer to a question I hadn't even thought of asking - who do I least care about what they might be drinking?
Yep, I now know the answer ...
Reply to
AxisOfBeagles

writes:
Wow, and I didn't think it was possible for me to dislike Rush more. I was wrong.
Reply to
DaleW

On Thu, 22 Nov 2007 04:32:12 -0800 (PST)
writes:
Hard to find much redeeming. I clicked down the link where he lauds President Sarko. He notes how France is turning conservative, never realizing that Sarko is comfortably to the left of any Democrat!
-E
Reply to
Emery Davis

writes:
Rush comes from a long line of talk radio hosts that date back to before WW II and that are to the far right. Rush does seem to have more influence than most, and he does have a talent for making many people like him and many others hate him - there seems to be little middle ground. For him, even the current administration in Washington often seems too far left. He is a huge person. I have heard him called "Lush" instead of "Rush" by some who dislike him. He does seem to have plenty of money to spend. I have read other stories about wines he drinks. He serves much first growth Bordeaux of good vintages, including old ones. If it is expensive, famous, or rare he likely serves it.
Reply to
cwdjrxyz

The below is very well said Ed. Which is why so many of us are sick and tired of hateful blowhards like Limbaugh. And as I said before, he is one human being whom I truly couldn't care less what he drinks.
Reply to
AxisOfBeagles

On Thu, 22 Nov 2007 16:54:07 GMT
writes:
Hi Ed,
Hope you're enjoying a very fine Thanksgiving. Just read the rest of the comments, and like Dale, I must say I was referring to Rush's blowhard comments about "tongue on the floor." I find that very objectionable. I once remember hearing about Malcolm Forbes -- known for popping fine Paulliac at lunch and boasting about pouring the rest down the drain. This is a little similar, somehow.
I've heard a little about Rush's various substance problems, like you I don't consider this grist for the mill.
Now, the French, supporters and detractors alike, refer to Sarkozy as Sarko. So there's no disrespect intended there, nor would any be perceived. No doubt his entourage calls him Nicolas. (A very good book on Sarko by Yasmina Resa; "The Dawn, Day or Night." I recommend it, but probably not translated yet. She certainly admires the man and paints a vivid and often amusing picture).
Sarko's avowed strategy was to pander to the right in order to undermine the fascist National Front party. This has led to some curious policies like advocating DNA testing for emigrants. (Those with a keen sense of history may draw their own conclusions.)
However, he is (on practical terms) a hands on nationalising manager, protectionist when it comes to trade, supports a vast and crumbling farm subsidy system, wouldn't dream of privatizing health care (nor should he in my mind) and supports a "tax-and-spend" system that would get any US politician skewered in an instant by all sides of the spectrum.
Oh, he has a socialist foreign minister and has gotten a socialist appointed to the head of the IMF! (Both good fellows, BTW.)
More to the point, the poor fellow is a tea-totaller. Although I believe he permits himself the occasional Havana, at least. Now it is well known that the Palace has a very considerable cellar, I believe they spend (or spent) 250,000 EU per year keeping it stocked.
How can France have a abstinent president? Sacre Bleu! :) They need our help keeping up.
To your very good health, Ed,
-E
Reply to
Emery Davis

I have waited on the man. When he was in my restaurant, he opened the wine list and then closed it. When I came to the table, he gave me the number . I said "Romanee Conti". He said "Yes, my favorite wine". He was nothing but a gentleman. I opened the wine, they each drank half a glass, leaving me more than half a bottle. In my restaurant, the menu prix fice is $95, plus a $4,000 bottle means a large check. He left the waiters 20%. Waiters like $900 tips from 2 people.
Mark
Reply to
Tire-Bouchon

On Thu, 22 Nov 2007 21:30:05 -0800 (PST)
Honestly "my favorite wine" rubs me the wrong way too, it implies he spends a lot of time drinking R.C. Kind of boasting, perhaps. Glad he was a gentleman, though.
I'm prompted to respond with a question about this kind of order, independent of Mr. Limbaugh. Question of etiquette.
If someone who is not known to you orders a radically expensive bottle, do you somehow verify they know what they're doing? I can imagine someone who knows little about wine misreading the list, then goggling the bill when it arrives.
What's the procedure for this situation?
-E
Reply to
Emery Davis

Good question, because those things have happened before. As an example, when someone orders a $1,000 bottle, I usually counter with a suggestion around $700. If they blanch at that price, I know they've made a mistake and proceed accordingly. I have had customers order terribly expensive wines by mistake despite my pointing directly at the price more than once. Conversely, I have had customers who could not grasp the fact that the most expensive wine is not necessarily the best wine.
Reply to
Tire-Bouchon

This can be a problem at wine auctions. There are people who just like to bid, but then do not have the money to pay. Of course the auction does not lose the wine, but they do lose commissions and offend those wanting to auction their wine.
Michael Broadbent was auctioning wine at Christie's many years ago. A man, with two companions, was placing top bids for many of the top expensive wines. Broadbent cut off accepting more bids from the man, because he did not know him. The man and his two companions were "casually dressed, to say the least". The man was Andrew Lloyd-Webber who was just about to stage Jesus Christ Superstar and was not yet well known. Broadbent invited him to Christie's for lunch two months latter, apologized, and explained his actions.Broadbent calls this the most embarrassing moment in his career as an auctioneer. Broadbent describes this incident in his Vintage Wine book.
Reply to
cwdjrxyz

Perhaps when Rush made the "tongue" remark, he was really talking about a corned beef tongue sandwich? I haven't listened to his show in a while.
Dan-O (Wonder what Limbaugh thinks of Missouri wines?)
Reply to
Dan the Man

Personally I enjoy the Norton/Cynthiana with beef, Chambourcin with pasta, and Vignoles as a dessert wine.
Mark Sievert of Missouri (who BTW, skips the sweet reds of Missouri)
Reply to
Mark E Sievert

Regardless of which side of the political spectrum you're on, we all know "a little dope" can become commander-in-chief. We even had one who said he didn't inhale. LOL!
And just for the perspective whack of it...40 years ago, an exceedingly famous jazz musician (and Nobel Prize winner) sat in our SF living room and regaled us with tales of his command performance at the White House. After which, he claimed, he and LBJ retired to a private room and "smoked a little dope." There was no reason for him to make it up.
Knowing what I know now, I'm a lot more interested in what wine LBJ served in 1967. Think of the Bordeaux available for a song at that time. I wonder if the White House (or maybe the LBJ Library) maintains an archive like that.
JJ
Reply to
jj

He lauds particular issues he agrees with. Hell, he bashes Bush and many Reps routinely on particular issues. In the end he's just an entertainer and nothing more. I may agree with some of his issues but can't stand his show.
Does anyone really care what wine super famous so and so drinks? I was in a winery in Temecula, CA. I asked if they had any wines that were not on the tasting list. I was told "Why yes, we have a $100 wine that Jay Leno liked so much he bought 6 cases". No mention of what the wine is, just the price and that Jay Leno bought a bunch.
Reply to
miles

I've had severe rhematoid arthritis for over twenty years. Severe pain is an old friend of mine.
Reply to
Bi!!

Mine too. I can see in certain cases where a person is in extreme pain, Dr's can't find or solve the issue, physical therapy etc. fails, that the person resorts to pain killers to get through a day. Some of those become addictive.
Now for me I have found what works better than strong pain killers is a few glasses of wine. Works great!
Reply to
miles

I know that when you go tasting in the CA wine country, you will come across a number of wineries that have a framed White house menu from a date on which their wine was served.
Since it /is/ the government, could we not make a FOIA request to discover the contents of the cellar?
K
Reply to
Kevin T. Neely

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