5 Gallon Boiling Pot - UK blues


I hear with a little jealousy how accessible bulk equipment seems to be in the US for home food and drink making. In England it seems that any larger cookware at a real premium.
I would love to find an affordable supplier of 5 gallon boiling pots suitable for heating all my must water in one hit. Currently the most I can boil at a time is about 6 litres and I fear that I am 'cooking' my fruit for too long when I add in four consecutive loads of boiling water over an hour or so - plus its a real hassle.
Does anyone know of any UK suppliers of suitable cookware which comes at a reasonable price? Otherwise, suggestions as to likely catering supply outlets would be a boon. I have googled this and am still reasearching, but most of the stuff I find is for stand alone electric boilers - I'd be happy enough to get one which would sit on my hob.
Many thanks for suggestions, Jim
Reply to
jim

Jim.. I'm sure you know this, be sure to get ceramic clad or stainless. Even short exposure to aluminum can cause problems with acids.
Reply to
EnoNut

Thanks for the advice both, I know to avoid aluminium, but reminders are always helpful :)
Those categories dont seem to exist for ebay UK, but I was able to drill down and find items that didn't appear to me previously from restaurant stock, trouble is they're in Germany and that doubles the price after delivery to UK.
I'm wondering if it might be worth a trip to some of the large chinese supermarkets nearby to see if they have something suitable.
Jim
Reply to
jim

Thanks for the suggestion. My only concern with a tea urn (and the reason I wasnt looking for them in particular) is that I don't know if you can use them to boil the sugar into the water or if that would gum up the works some how.
Do you use it to boil your water and sugar?
Cheers, Jim
turns up a few SS ones.
Reply to
jim

I have seen several posts lately about boiling the water used in winemaking or pasturizing the fruit. If this is your proceedure fine, but think about how comercial wineries do it. They never boil water they add or pasturize the fruit. I know this is important in beer making as the alcohol content is not high enough to protect the final product. But with wine, if you are fermenting to above 10%, it is not a problem. I never boild the water or paturize the furit and I have never had a problem. Just some comments. Maybe you are making things more complicated than need be.
Ray
Reply to
Ray Calvert

Thanks for the comment Ray.
I do so to dissolve the sugar and believe it helps for flavour and colour extraction too as well as a step against wild yeasts on the fruit. The reason I think this is because of the words of Terry Garey and Jack Keller who advise the practice. I could be wrong, I've not had reason to doubt the process until now.
I am making country wines rather than grape wines, I don't know if that makes a difference. I started to like the idea of not sulfating the must to begin with - on the grounds that it was treated to a soaking in near-boiling water which should do a decent enough job of killing most life in there.
I could well be wrong, those are my assumptions / reasons. Cheers for the brain food.
Jim
pasturizing the fruit. If this is your
water they add or pasturize the fruit.
enough to protect the final product. But
boild the water or paturize the furit and
more complicated than need be.
US for home food and drink making. In
for heating all my must water in one
that I am 'cooking' my fruit for too long
plus its a real hassle.
reasonable price? Otherwise, suggestions
and am still reasearching, but most of the
one which would sit on my hob.
Reply to
jim

Jim, whatever works for you is what you should do. Sulphiting and letting sit for about a day will, however, increase the glycerol production by your yeast. glycerol adds smoothness and some body to wine.
Reply to
Paul E. Lehmann

AGA do an 8 ltr stock pot in stainless steel. Thats about 2 gals. However it will be pricey!
--
Thanks and regards, Shane.
"A closed mouth gathers no feet!"
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Reply to
Shane Badham

Each of us developes his own proceedure as he goes along. I would not argue. Just commenting on my proceedure. Heating the fruit will probably change the flavor a bit. Some people talk about it causing a Jaminess in the wine, but heck, I like Jam too.
I have been known to pour boiling water over fruit with skins to kill anything that might be on them, especially if they show signs of mold or the like. I don't worry about wild yeast. I do not have trouble disolving sugar but honey can be a problem so I have added some hot water to honey to soften it.
Ray
Reply to
Ray Calvert

hi jim! i usually suggest this to my non-foodservice friends: make friends with a local chef ( we're easy, chat us up, tell us your problem, then promise us a taste..) ask him or her to take you into a professional wholesale shop. be specific in your needs with with a clerk & .be prepared to pay cash money. plan B would be to ask friend chef to share some of his catalogues and order from same - we usually get supply catalogues regularly. plan 3: bribe friend chef to toss an appropriate vessel into the dustbin, as i believe you call them, some late night whilst you're wandering past his back door . ;^) maybe friend chef chef knows of a concern about to close up shop... HTH regards, bob
Reply to
bobdrob

All good ideas! Thanks Bob :)
Jim
with a local chef ( we're easy, chat us
you into a professional wholesale shop. be
plan B would be to ask friend chef to share
regularly. plan 3: bribe friend chef to
late night whilst you're wandering past
up shop... HTH regards, bob
US for home food and drink making. In
for heating all my must water in one
that I am 'cooking' my fruit for too long
plus its a real hassle.
reasonable price? Otherwise, suggestions
and am still reasearching, but most of the
one which would sit on my hob.
Reply to
jim

Sorry be away, NO to boiling the sugar, I use a 25 ltr plactic fermenter the and release from the Burco onto the sugar in there. Needs fast wrist action, and usually to stage.
Reply to
come on!!!!

Right, that's how I imagined using it, thanks for the update :)
Jim
and release from the Burco onto the sugar
wasnt looking for them in particular) is
that would gum up the works some how.
turns up a few SS ones.
Reply to
jim

Ray,
I agree with you on "fresh" fruit. However, I freeze most of the fruit i pick for country wines, because my motorcycling hobby takes me away for much of the harvesting season.
Freezing most fruits (berries, plums, peaches, etc) will help macerate the fruit, bringing more of the fruit in contact with the yeasts. This may in the long term take longer to clear, but all of the pulp gets exposed in the must.
Since I prepare the fruit before freezing (pitting and rinsing), I get to go right to the prep phase if I dissolve sugar in boiling water and further masticate the thawed/partially frozen fruit. This I can do at my leisure during the winter months.
This has worked well for me with blueberry, blackberry, elderberry, plum, and cherry.
Magically, after I boil water and pour over the fruit, I get a room temp must that I adjust SG witi simple sugar and elbow grease.
I have yet to fail with this method. !!
I one day will try this with grapes, freeze, press, simulated ice wine anyone?
Greg, Erie, PA
Reply to
Hoss

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