Apple Cider Wine - adding Tannin


Hi.
I'm taking some Apple Cider (no additives, just pastuerized) for a
gallon of wine. Have Jack Keller's recipe, he states "taste and add
tannin as necessary". The question is:
What am I tasting for? If it's dull, then I add tannin? When it bites my
tongue, I don't?
I am guessing, but wanted to confirm the use of adding Tannin.
thanks, and I read this newsgroup daily and growing in skill and
knowledge weekly.
DAve
Reply to
DAve Allison
All the recipes I have for apple juice or cider wine call for 1/4 teaspoon of tannin, per gallon. I also would like to make some cider wine, but can't find cider without preservatives. Bart
Reply to
Bob Bart
Search your local area for "pick your own" apples. The one local to me also had apples and cider for sale. No preservatives, and unpasturized, if you can believe that in this world today. I'm guessing they just produce apple cider so people can make hard cider. Or for people who think pasturizing is bad, or something.
I left out the tannin, myself. Just cider, some spices, and cider yeast from the wine store.
Reply to
ralconte
Thanks. My question is : what does Tannin do? Does it make it more "bite" or less "bite"?
I'm not sure what part of US you are in, but Ohio, Virginia and North Carolina - I find local orchards have apple cider with no preservatives. I can't find Apple juice though. But today I added the yeast, so my gallon is off and running. The recipe says it should be ready to drink in a year. wow. long wait. patience is what i'm learning in this hobby! DAve
Reply to
DAve Allison
It is always difficult to describe what something tastes like. We have lots of words that we are all familiar with that describe what something looks like but not that many that we all agree on that describe a taste.
Tannin adds zest or bite to the flavor if that does anything for you. Do some experimenting even if you have to put off your adjustment a few weeks. It will not hurt your wine to wait a little. Try this. Put 1/4 tsp of grape tannin in a gallon of water. Set it aside for a few days to sit. Then taste it and some plain water. this should give you an idea of what underlying taste you are looking for.
If your wine tastes flat or unbalanced it could be due to lack of acid (sour) or lack of tannin (bite). It is not always easy to tell which and if both are off it is really hard. But if the acidity okay but it seems to be lacking something, it is probably tannin. Try adding a little and see how it effects it.
Ray
Reply to
Ray Calvert
Tannin is the dry astringent mouth puckering quality found in red wines but not in white wines. It is the bitterness found in plum skins and grape skins.
Reply to
Droopy
it is found in white wines. Just not to as great of an extent. Without any tannin, white wines will be flat and flabby.
Ray
Reply to
Ray Calvert
It is what provides a "chalkiness" or drying effect to the wine. Yes,it occurs in both whites and reds but much, much, MUCH higher in reds particularly because of the skin contact time ( Thanks. My question is : what does Tannin do? Does it make it more "bite"
Reply to
patrick mcdonald
Thanks for all the replies. Now I get it. :*) I think I understand now what to "taste" for applying Tannin to the apple cider wine.
next... pumpkin wine. Dang, my wife says we should consider a basement in our next house to hold all the wine. ha. DAve
Reply to
DAve Allison

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