Evil Wine....

Now, most people know that if you eat beets, or drink beet wine, you
have a change of passing red urine. What most peopel don't know is
that ingesting oxalic acid alongwith the beets greatly increses this
chance, as the oxalic interferes with the metabolism of the pigments.
So, if I starty a rhubarb-beet wine now, it should be ready to serve
on April Fool's Day.....

---The Mad Alchemist---
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Reply to
Darren George
You are bad! :-) I had a kidney infection at 12 and the doctor gave me a prescription for some pills that turned my urine tuquoise blue for two weeks. Shoulda seen me and the guys at the urinal in the locker room...
Reply to
Bob
Darren, I've made and drank a lot of beet wine and never passed red urine. My wife says she hasn't either. Where did you get this information?
April Fool's Day in 2007 perhaps. Beet wine does not lose its earthy undertones for at least two years, but the wait is well worth it.
Jack Keller, The Winemaking Home Page
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Reply to
Jack Keller
I don't know where he got this information but googling it did come up with a number of references that state it is possible, though some of them state that it occurs in the "rare individual." None of the sources say anything about how much beets someone is required to eat for this condition to happen, nor how long it takes. Darren you may have to go beyound and above just serving some wine, you may have to serve a whole meal (beet soup, beat side dish, rhubarb pie for desert, your beet/rhubarb wine; you may even have to add some red food colouring to your meal). Ken
Reply to
Ken Vale
On 22 Oct 2004 20:18:13 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com (Jack Keller) wrote:
Joe Schwarcz' "Radar, Playful Pigs, and Hula Hoops" (a commentary on the fascinating chemistry of everyday life) says that red beet urine will occur in about 15% of the population- I'm assuming that this is probably genetic, since most of my cousins complain about it. Oxalic acid will increase this number (although I've done no experiments to find out by how much).
Even with the oxalic acid, not everyone will be affected by this.
Every time someone calls beet wine or carrot wine "earthy", I'm tempted to point out that you are supposed to wash the beets. But I haven't been posting here long enough for people to recognize my jokes.
Cheers, ---The Mad Alchemist---
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Reply to
Darren George
Darren,
I would have probably missed your joke unless you made it obvious (smiley face, LOL, ROTFLMAO, etc.). Anyway, the truth is that almost all root wines have an "earthy" nuance to them when young. Carrots are perhaps the least earthy, but it is still there. Parsnip, turnip, celery root, beet, dandelion root, rutabagas all have this taste when young. Onion and potato wines do not; I don't know why.
Here's an experiment you (or anyone serious about winemaking) can do. Make a gallon of beet wine. It will take about 8 months from start to bottling if you make it the way I do (see
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. When finished, date the bottles and set them aside. Sixteen months later, start another gallon batch and make it the exact same way. In about 8 months, when you bottle it, pour the residual left in the secondary after bottling into one glass and open a bottle of the previous batch (now 24 months in the bottle) and pour a second glass. Now taste each and compare. Then you will know the truth about aging beet wines. BTW, if you wait another 16 months and make a third batch and then taste a glass from all three batches, you will be amazed a the smoothness of the first batch (now 4 years old).
I did this for many years with apple wine, making a batch every autumn and only when the new batch was in the bottle did I open the previous year's apple wine (a practice my grandfather taught me). It was always orders of magnitude better than the new wine, but after its third year in the bottle it declined rapidly. You can extend this another year with tannin, but it changes the wine quite a bit -- it's okay, though, if you spice the wine before bottling (cinnamon, cloves and allspice).
Jack Keller, The Winemaking Home Page
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Reply to
Jack Keller
On 26 Oct 2004 08:34:07 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@lycos.com (Jack Keller) wrote:
Yeah, but it would have been ridiculous to ROTFLMAO at my own joke.
I believe you- I haven't tried making any of them yet. I just couldn't resist the comment.
The idea that a bottle of wine could last two years without being drunk boggles my mind. I guess I'm just not making enough.
Definitely not the same apples that I had in Edmonton- they were way too tannic for good wine (unless blended with black currant or chokecherry). Now I'm in the Okanagan valley, so I'm trying wine from the local juice.
Speaking of experiments, since you're not normally susceptible to beet-urine, perhaps you could try having some rhubarb wine in the same evening as beet wine. Let us know if it has an effect.
Cheers,
---The Mad Alchemist---
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Reply to
Darren George

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