How can you build a DIY wine filter?


I'd like to build a DIY wine filter, so yesterday I went to Home Depot to look at the water filters they sell. They have GE filter cartridges (such as the FXUTC), which can filter particles in the 0.5-1 micron range. However, I read the label on all of the different cartridges they have, and I couldn't find anywhere whether they had carbon or not.
Has anybody built a DIY wine filter? How did you do it? Where did you buy the components? Thanks in advance.
P.S.: please let's discuss how to build a filter, not whether it's useful or appropriate for a home winemaker to filter wine. Thanks.
Reply to
Franco
> I'd like to build a DIY wine filter, so yesterday I went to Home Depot > to look at the water filters they sell. They have GE filter cartridges > (such as the FXUTC), which can filter particles in the 0.5-1 micron > range. However, I read the label on all of the different cartridges > they have, and I couldn't find anywhere whether they had carbon or not. > > Has anybody built a DIY wine filter? How did you do it? Where did you > buy the components? Thanks in advance. > > P.S.: please let's discuss how to build a filter, not whether it's > useful or appropriate for a home winemaker to filter wine. Thanks. > I put coffee paper filters into a funnel and run wine through when bottling, works ok for me.
Reply to
leon
> "Franco" wrote in message > news:1153927982.720076.107400@p79g2000cwp.googlegroups.com... >> I'd like to build a DIY wine filter, so yesterday I went to Home Depot >> to look at the water filters they sell. They have GE filter cartridges >> (such as the FXUTC), which can filter particles in the 0.5-1 micron >> range. However, I read the label on all of the different cartridges >> they have, and I couldn't find anywhere whether they had carbon or not. >> >> Has anybody built a DIY wine filter? How did you do it? Where did you >> buy the components? Thanks in advance. >> >> P.S.: please let's discuss how to build a filter, not whether it's >> useful or appropriate for a home winemaker to filter wine. Thanks. >> > I put coffee paper filters into a funnel and run wine through when bottling, > works ok for me. > >
That's what I do also. Not sure this is helpful, but wanted to state it.
-- DAve
--
DAve
Reply to
Dave Allison
Doesn;t that oxidze the wine a little too much? > I put coffee paper filters into a funnel and run wine through when > bottling, works ok for me. > >
Reply to
Ric
> Doesn;t that oxidze the wine a little too much? > >> I put coffee paper filters into a funnel and run wine through when >> bottling, works ok for me. >> >> > > No, not at all.
Reply to
leon
> I'd like to build a DIY wine filter, so yesterday I went to Home Depot > to look at the water filters they sell. They have GE filter cartridges > (such as the FXUTC), which can filter particles in the 0.5-1 micron > range. However, I read the label on all of the different cartridges > they have, and I couldn't find anywhere whether they had carbon or not. > > Has anybody built a DIY wine filter? How did you do it? Where did you > buy the components? Thanks in advance. > > P.S.: please let's discuss how to build a filter, not whether it's > useful or appropriate for a home winemaker to filter wine. Thanks. >
Franco,
A filter assembly suitable for the home winemaker can be easily made from standard, 10-inch housings. These filter housings are used to improve drinking water quality. They are made of plastic, and they can be purchased for about $25. Two plastic tubing fittings ($2) are needed to connect plastic tubing to the inlet and outlet ports in the housing. This type of filter assembly can be used with any small transfer pump that can deliver a pressure of at least 10 pounds per square inch. Alternatively, a gas transfer system can be used to move the wine through the filter.
One-micron (nominal) depth type cartridges cost about $4, and they are suitable for rough filtration of all types of wine. Either 0.5-micron (nominal) depth cartridges or 0.2-micron (nominal) depth cartridges costing can be used for polish filtration. These cartridges cost about seven dollars and twenty dollars respectively. A 0.2-micron nominal cartridge is preferred for final filtration of white and blush wines. Cartridge life can be extended by carefully cleaning up the wine by fining and racking before it is filtered.
More info here
formatting link

Reply to
Lum Eisenman
> > "Franco" wrote in message > news:1153927982.720076.107400@p79g2000cwp.googlegroups.com... >> I'd like to build a DIY wine filter, so yesterday I went to Home Depot >> to look at the water filters they sell. They have GE filter cartridges >> (such as the FXUTC), which can filter particles in the 0.5-1 micron >> range. However, I read the label on all of the different cartridges >> they have, and I couldn't find anywhere whether they had carbon or not. >> >> Has anybody built a DIY wine filter? How did you do it? Where did you >> buy the components? Thanks in advance. >> >> P.S.: please let's discuss how to build a filter, not whether it's >> useful or appropriate for a home winemaker to filter wine. Thanks. >> > > Franco, > > A filter assembly suitable for the home winemaker can be easily made from > standard, 10-inch housings. These filter housings are used to improve > drinking water quality. They are made of plastic, and they can be > purchased > for about $25. Two plastic tubing fittings ($2) are needed to connect > plastic tubing to the inlet and outlet ports in the housing. This type of > filter assembly can be used with any small transfer pump that can deliver > a > pressure of at least 10 pounds per square inch. Alternatively, a gas > transfer system can be used to move the wine through the filter. > > One-micron (nominal) depth type cartridges cost about $4, and they are > suitable for rough filtration of all types of wine. Either 0.5-micron > (nominal) depth cartridges or 0.2-micron (nominal) depth cartridges > costing > can be used for polish filtration. These cartridges cost about seven > dollars and twenty dollars respectively. A 0.2-micron nominal cartridge > is > preferred for final filtration of white and blush wines. Cartridge life > can > be extended by carefully cleaning up the wine by fining and racking before > it is filtered. > > More info here
formatting link

You can buy a hand pump style filer kit for approx $30
I never filter my wine just age it long enough to clear properly.
Reply to
Martik
> > "Ric" wrote in message > news:qcPxg.73185$fb2.4480@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net... >> Doesn;t that oxidze the wine a little too much? >> >>> I put coffee paper filters into a funnel and run wine through when >>> bottling, works ok for me. >>> >>> >> >> > No, not at all. Does not clear the wine either. Not fine or thick enough.
Reply to
Martik
> > "leon" wrote in message > news:KOPxg.31468$i32.30636@newsfe2-gui.ntli.net... >> >> "Ric" wrote in message >> news:qcPxg.73185$fb2.4480@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net... >>> Doesn;t that oxidze the wine a little too much? >>> >>>> I put coffee paper filters into a funnel and run wine through when >>>> bottling, works ok for me. >>>> >>>> >>> >>> >> No, not at all. > Does not clear the wine either. Not fine or thick enough. > It clears ok, also you should bear in mind that this is a last process after finings have already cleared most of muck, it is only used to remove any bits that don't sink or the when the last dregs are being siphoned, and as i have used this method for many years experience shows that it does do what i want it to do.
Reply to
leon
Lum: Thanks for the response. What I'd like to know is: where can I buy these cartridges? Home Depot had different types of cartridges, but apparently they all have activated carbon, and that's a no-no, correct? The other element that I'm having a little trouble finding is an inexpensive transfer pump. I am familiar with Shurflo and Flojet, but it seems that their pumps are in the $150 range. I'd like to build a complete system for under $100. > "Franco" wrote in message > news:1153927982.720076.107400@p79g2000cwp.googlegroups.com... > > I'd like to build a DIY wine filter, so yesterday I went to Home Depot > > to look at the water filters they sell. They have GE filter cartridges > > (such as the FXUTC), which can filter particles in the 0.5-1 micron > > range. However, I read the label on all of the different cartridges > > they have, and I couldn't find anywhere whether they had carbon or not. > > > > Has anybody built a DIY wine filter? How did you do it? Where did you > > buy the components? Thanks in advance. > > > > P.S.: please let's discuss how to build a filter, not whether it's > > useful or appropriate for a home winemaker to filter wine. Thanks. > > > > Franco, > > A filter assembly suitable for the home winemaker can be easily made from > standard, 10-inch housings. These filter housings are used to improve > drinking water quality. They are made of plastic, and they can be purchased > for about $25. Two plastic tubing fittings ($2) are needed to connect > plastic tubing to the inlet and outlet ports in the housing. This type of > filter assembly can be used with any small transfer pump that can deliver a > pressure of at least 10 pounds per square inch. Alternatively, a gas > transfer system can be used to move the wine through the filter. > > One-micron (nominal) depth type cartridges cost about $4, and they are > suitable for rough filtration of all types of wine. Either 0.5-micron > (nominal) depth cartridges or 0.2-micron (nominal) depth cartridges costing > can be used for polish filtration. These cartridges cost about seven > dollars and twenty dollars respectively. A 0.2-micron nominal cartridge is > preferred for final filtration of white and blush wines. Cartridge life can > be extended by carefully cleaning up the wine by fining and racking before > it is filtered. > > More info here
formatting link

Reply to
Franco

Franco, Try here
formatting link
> Lum: > > Thanks for the response. What I'd like to know is: where can I buy > these cartridges? Home Depot had different types of cartridges, but > apparently they all have activated carbon, and that's a no-no, correct? > The other element that I'm having a little trouble finding is an > inexpensive transfer pump. I am familiar with Shurflo and Flojet, but > it seems that their pumps are in the $150 range. I'd like to build a > complete system for under $100.
Reply to
Lum Eisenman
> > "Martik" wrote in message > news:J8Wxg.174729$771.96175@edtnps89... >> >> "leon" wrote in message >> news:KOPxg.31468$i32.30636@newsfe2-gui.ntli.net... >>> >>> "Ric" wrote in message >>> news:qcPxg.73185$fb2.4480@newssvr27.news.prodigy.net... >>>> Doesn;t that oxidze the wine a little too much? >>>> >>>>> I put coffee paper filters into a funnel and run wine through when >>>>> bottling, works ok for me. >>>>> >>>>> >>>> >>>> >>> No, not at all. >> Does not clear the wine either. Not fine or thick enough. >> > It clears ok, also you should bear in mind that this is a last process > after finings have already cleared most of muck, it is only used to remove > any bits that don't sink or the when the last dregs are being siphoned, > and as i have used this method for many years experience shows that it > does do what i want it to do. Maybe you have finer coffee filters or use more than one. The ones I use in Canada are too coarse. If the wine is slightly cloudy it will still be so after filtering.
Reply to
Martik
That'd probably filter out a lot of the flavour. > I'd like to build a DIY wine filter, so yesterday I went to Home Depot > to look at the water filters they sell. They have GE filter cartridges > (such as the FXUTC), which can filter particles in the 0.5-1 micron > range. However, I read the label on all of the different cartridges > they have, and I couldn't find anywhere whether they had carbon or not. > > Has anybody built a DIY wine filter? How did you do it? Where did you > buy the components? Thanks in advance. > > P.S.: please let's discuss how to build a filter, not whether it's > useful or appropriate for a home winemaker to filter wine. Thanks. >
Reply to
M Lawson

Franco-
Contact these folks:
formatting link
/ Ask for Ed- he can point you to filters you can buy for standard housings. They've done well for me. Jason > Lum: > > Thanks for the response. What I'd like to know is: where can I buy > these cartridges? Home Depot had different types of cartridges, but > apparently they all have activated carbon, and that's a no-no, correct? > The other element that I'm having a little trouble finding is an > inexpensive transfer pump. I am familiar with Shurflo and Flojet, but > it seems that their pumps are in the $150 range. I'd like to build a > complete system for under $100. > > > > > "Franco" wrote in message > > news:1153927982.720076.107400@p79g2000cwp.googlegroups.com... > > > I'd like to build a DIY wine filter, so yesterday I went to Home Depot > > > to look at the water filters they sell. They have GE filter cartridges > > > (such as the FXUTC), which can filter particles in the 0.5-1 micron > > > range. However, I read the label on all of the different cartridges > > > they have, and I couldn't find anywhere whether they had carbon or not. > > > > > > Has anybody built a DIY wine filter? How did you do it? Where did you > > > buy the components? Thanks in advance. > > > > > > P.S.: please let's discuss how to build a filter, not whether it's > > > useful or appropriate for a home winemaker to filter wine. Thanks. > > > > > > > Franco, > > > > A filter assembly suitable for the home winemaker can be easily made from > > standard, 10-inch housings. These filter housings are used to improve > > drinking water quality. They are made of plastic, and they can be purchased > > for about $25. Two plastic tubing fittings ($2) are needed to connect > > plastic tubing to the inlet and outlet ports in the housing. This type of > > filter assembly can be used with any small transfer pump that can deliver a > > pressure of at least 10 pounds per square inch. Alternatively, a gas > > transfer system can be used to move the wine through the filter. > > > > One-micron (nominal) depth type cartridges cost about $4, and they are > > suitable for rough filtration of all types of wine. Either 0.5-micron > > (nominal) depth cartridges or 0.2-micron (nominal) depth cartridges costing > > can be used for polish filtration. These cartridges cost about seven > > dollars and twenty dollars respectively. A 0.2-micron nominal cartridge is > > preferred for final filtration of white and blush wines. Cartridge life can > > be extended by carefully cleaning up the wine by fining and racking before > > it is filtered. > > > > More info here
formatting link

Reply to
purduephotog

I have a filter system that I built that is basically a copy of the one that is sold on Presque Isle's website www.piwi.com
I bought the 10" cartridge filter assembly from a plumbing store, and the 1/4 hp carbinator motor for about $50. from grainger. This I attached to a Procon pump that is designed for the transfer of wine and wont oxidize it, and this also was purchased from Presque Isle. It is rated at 110 gph I believe. It attatches to the motor with a special clamp that costs about $2. from Presque Isles so I would make sure you remembered to order one of them if you decide to go this route. The carbonator motor that attaches to the pump has a different shaft on it with a half moon sort of end, so make sure you order the right one. I also buy the filters from Piwi which are .45 micron, and .2 micron nominal rating. In my experience you can count on either one of them to filter the wine well enough to not use sorbate. That is not to say that this method is sterile filtration as it is not, but for the home wine maker it is more than adequate. My advice to anyone doing a filtration such as this would be that the wine should be so clear BEFORE you filter it that you think it is ready to go into the bottle as is. Next I would highly recommend the use of fresh Sorbate (and sulfite of course) along with the filtration. If you plan to filter a wine that is cloudy, then you are going to be spending a whole lot of money on filters, or I would recommend buying the cheap 1 micron filters for this purpose. Ideally your wine should be fined and clear before filtration. HTH John Dixon
Reply to
J Dixon
John- > I have a filter system that I built that is basically a copy of the one that > is sold on Presque Isle's website www.piwi.com > snip >If you plan to filter a wine that is cloudy, then > you are going to be spending a whole lot of money on filters, or I would > recommend buying the cheap 1 micron filters for this purpose. Ideally your > wine should be fined and clear before filtration. HTH >John Dixon
If you contact Aftek they can point you to reusable filters. You shouldn't have to discard a cartridge filter if it slows- just purge it and wash/clean it. If you aren't using re-usable filters- why not? Please note I didn't check the prices at piwine.
Even my depth filters are reusable- I don't, but I could back flush them with SO2 / NaOH and rinse, then run normal again. No reason at $0.50 / filter I only need 1 or 2 for 15 gallons- 3 (Standard set) is overkill.
Jason
Reply to
purduephotog

DrinksForum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.