Removing glue from wine bottle labels


There has been considerable discussion on this topic, and I've tried a number of different approaches. Most were mediocre at best.
Butyrate dope thinner works remarkably well. After scraping the labels off (I use a dull hunting knife after soaking), a bit of the thinner on a paper towel removes most of the remaining stuff in one pass!
A quart would do dozens if not hundreds of bottles. Available at aviation maintenance shops that work on fabric covered aircraft.
Reply to
Jack
> There has been considerable discussion on this topic, and I've tried a > number of different approaches. Most were mediocre at best. > > Butyrate dope thinner works remarkably well. After scraping the labels > off (I use a dull hunting knife after soaking), a bit of the thinner on > a paper towel removes most of the remaining stuff in one pass! > > A quart would do dozens if not hundreds of bottles. Available at > aviation maintenance shops that work on fabric covered aircraft.
Acetone works well too, I use exactly the same method as you. It's available anywhere they sell paint.
Joe
Reply to
Joe Sallustio
I think my meathod works best. I now have hundreds of bottles so I just toss the ones with bad glue. After you have washed hundreds of bottles you learn which are worth salvaging. Just look down the road to when you have a nice inventory of both full and empties and life is so much better! Ray > There has been considerable discussion on this topic, and I've tried a > number of different approaches. Most were mediocre at best. > > Butyrate dope thinner works remarkably well. After scraping the labels > off (I use a dull hunting knife after soaking), a bit of the thinner on > a paper towel removes most of the remaining stuff in one pass! > > A quart would do dozens if not hundreds of bottles. Available at > aviation maintenance shops that work on fabric covered aircraft. > > >
Reply to
Ray Calvert
A-men, brother. Now that I have hundreds of bottles, sorted and cleaned - the hard ones - tossed! smile. DAve > I think my meathod works best. I now have hundreds of bottles so I just > toss the ones with bad glue. After you have washed hundreds of bottles you > learn which are worth salvaging. Just look down the road to when you have a > nice inventory of both full and empties and life is so much better! > > Ray > > "Jack" wrote in message > news:46A65BD8.B5EBCFF1@nbnet.nb.ca... >> There has been considerable discussion on this topic, and I've tried a >> number of different approaches. Most were mediocre at best. >> >> Butyrate dope thinner works remarkably well. After scraping the labels >> off (I use a dull hunting knife after soaking), a bit of the thinner on >> a paper towel removes most of the remaining stuff in one pass! >> >> A quart would do dozens if not hundreds of bottles. Available at >> aviation maintenance shops that work on fabric covered aircraft. >> >> >> > >
Reply to
Dave Allison

I'm fairly new to this, but a friend who works at an upscale restaurant has been bringing me about a dozen bottles every week or two for the past few months. I start by rinsing and filling the bottles with hot water. I stand them in the laundry sink, and then fill it with hot water and let them soak. Some of the labels fall off by themselves. Most, I can scrape off with my thumb nail, after soaking for an hour or so, and some won't come off at all. For the really stubborn labels, I use a razor scraper and peel it off in strips. To remove the remaining glue, I lightly scrub the outside of the bottle with an S.O.S. pad. This removes 99% of the glues used on most bottles. For those that are really stubborn, I spray it with citrus based Goo Gone. That stuff is awesome. I then scrub as before using the steel wool S.O.S. pad, and the Goo Gone quickly disolves the glue and it simply rinses away. This has been working very well for me, and I now have about 125 empty bottles in the basement awaiting my first creations to finish.
Reply to
Gumpydog1
> There has been considerable discussion on this topic, and I've tried a > number of different approaches. Most were mediocre at best. > > Butyrate dope thinner works remarkably well. After scraping the labels > off (I use a dull hunting knife after soaking), a bit of the thinner on > a paper towel removes most of the remaining stuff in one pass! > > A quart would do dozens if not hundreds of bottles. Available at > aviation maintenance shops that work on fabric covered aircraft.
got a better one.
fill your bathtub, add a small ammount of dish detergent (I use dawn). let soak overnight.
90% of the labels were off the next morning, the rest soaked off after i got back from work
Reply to
Tater
> >>There has been considerable discussion on this topic, and I've tried a >>number of different approaches. Most were mediocre at best. >> >>Butyrate dope thinner works remarkably well. After scraping the labels >>off (I use a dull hunting knife after soaking), a bit of the thinner on >>a paper towel removes most of the remaining stuff in one pass! >> >>A quart would do dozens if not hundreds of bottles. Available at >>aviation maintenance shops that work on fabric covered aircraft. > > > got a better one. > > fill your bathtub, add a small ammount of dish detergent (I use dawn). > let soak overnight. > > 90% of the labels were off the next morning, the rest soaked off after > i got back from work > I use the dish washer.
Put the bottle in with a nornal wash load, be sure the label can 'see' one of the sprayers.
The label will be on the bottom of the dish washer and all the glue is gone.
Found this be accident. Doesn't always work, but mostly.
don
Reply to
Donald
> > >>There has been considerable discussion on this topic, and I've tried a > >>number of different approaches. Most were mediocre at best. > > >>Butyrate dope thinner works remarkably well. After scraping the labels > >>off (I use a dull hunting knife after soaking), a bit of the thinner on > >>a paper towel removes most of the remaining stuff in one pass! > > >>A quart would do dozens if not hundreds of bottles. Available at > >>aviation maintenance shops that work on fabric covered aircraft. > > > got a better one. > > > fill your bathtub, add a small ammount of dish detergent (I use dawn). > > let soak overnight. > > > 90% of the labels were off the next morning, the rest soaked off after > > i got back from work > > I use the dish washer. > > Put the bottle in with a nornal wash load, be sure the label can 'see' > one of the sprayers. > > The label will be on the bottom of the dish washer and all the glue is gone. > > Found this be accident. Doesn't always work, but mostly. > > don- Hide quoted text - > > - Show quoted text -
Paper can plug up the water outlet of the dishwasher - pain to clean up. Proceed with caution.
Pp
Reply to
pp

DrinksForum website is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.