Clearing in a cool place

Have a question or want to show off your project? Post it! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View


I'm about to make my first attempt at brewing some beer (Young's Definitive
Bitter). It says in the instructions that after transferring to the pressure
barrel and leaving for 4 days in a warm place (20degC), you should transfer
to a cool place to allow to clear, clarify and mature (3 to 4 weeks). I
don't really have a cool place in my flat - what difference would it make
leaving 3 to 4 weeks at room temperature? NB If I open the kitchen window it
may get down to 17 or 18 degrees C at night but back up to 20 during the
day. ( I may bottle some of it though and put it in the fridge)

Peter

anon_peter@yahoo.co.uk



Re: Clearing in a cool place



Quoted text here. Click to load it

Mostly the cool maturation helps to clarify the beer ... the cool temps
helps speed the settling of the yeast and other things, like "chill
haze."

IMHO, 17-20C will be OK, but your beer may not be as clear as it would
if you cooled it on down to the 5C area, perhaps.  The taste will
probably be about the same either way, tho' it will "mature" faster at
warmer temperatures.

Derric


Re: Clearing in a cool place


Quoted text here. Click to load it

What Derric says here is spot on Peter.

Personally, I don't really care what my beer looks like. I don't spend
a lot of time looking at it. For this reason I don't get concerned
with clarifying the brew. Some people do and good luck to them.

Again, you decide how you want it and do it that way. That's the
beauty of home brewing. You can make beer the way you want to.

Have fun.

PM



Re: Clearing in a cool place


Quoted text here. Click to load it

G'day Peter,

I'd say it's not all that important. I've had brews sit in the kitchen
for a few weeks while I've been away on holiday, or whatever. No
problems.

However, the method on the instructions you are using are different to
any I have seen. Not wrong. Different. My usual method (over many
years) is to brew in the fermenter for about a week and then put into
bottles and place in a cool place to allow to clear, clarify and
mature (3 to 4 weeks), or as I do these days, brew in the fermenter
for a week, transfer to a keg, put the keg straight into the fridge
and gas up, and drink in 3-4 days.

It's probably not all that important. Have a play and see what works
for you.

Cheers,

PM


Re: Clearing in a cool place



Quoted text here. Click to load it
Definitive
pressure
transfer
make
window it
Yes, that's what I was intending to do as well. Can you really fit a beer
keg in your fridge?

I was thinking of bottling some of the beer after the initial fermentation
is complete.
It would seem to make sense to siphon from the fermenter into the pressure
barrel,
add the priming sugar and finings, mix thoroughly then decant say 6 litres
into bottles.
The bottles could be left  4 days for secondary fermentation to take place
then transferred to the fridge. The pressure barrel would be left for 4 days
then transferred to a cool place for 3 or 4 weeks. Unfortunately I don't
have a cool place so the pressure barrel will just be left in the kitchen
with the window open. I'll probably just use the pressure barrel initially
and maybe try bottling some of the beer with my second batch.

Peter

anon_peter@yahoo.co.uk



Re: Clearing in a cool place


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Sure. Well a 19 litre Post Mix keg... This is not mine, but it is
simliar;

http://www.carwreck.com/img/beer_fridge-thumb.jpg


Quoted text here. Click to load it

I'm not familiar with pressure barrels, but it sounds like a big
version of a bottle? Gassed by secondary fermentation?

You might want to leave your bottles to condition a bit longer than 4
days. The rule I used to work to was 2 weeks minimum, with about 3
months being ideal. The taste does improve with the extra few weeks.
It might taste a bit thin after only 4 days. But, hey! As they say
here "Suck it and see."

Cheers,

PM


Re: Clearing in a cool place



Quoted text here. Click to load it
weeks). I
Quoted text here. Click to load it
the
beer
fermentation
pressure
litres
place
days
kitchen
initially
Well, it's just a sealed five gallon plastic barrel. The caps on some
barrels are fitted with a CO2 valve so you can inject further gas when the
naturally produced CO2 has been used up. Mine doesn't have a valve. It was
relatively inexpensive (18 pounds).

Peter

anon_peter@yahoo.co.uk



Re: Clearing in a cool place


On Wed, 23 May 2007 04:09:21 +0100, "Peter Barns"

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Is this a substitute for a "Cornelius" keg, like what
used to be used for soda (pop) syrup?

If there is an inexpensive plastic version available
that will hold pressure up to perhaps 25 psi (I don't
know the more sensible MKS system equivalent that you
use in the UK--sorry), I might be interested in getting
back in to kegging again. I gave up a bit too soon, I
think. Learned a lot since then and think I could give
it a go and be successful.

Am I correct in thinking that you're trying to do what
CAMRA promotes in making a naturally carbonated ale and
not just artificially carbonating your beer (just using
the additional CO2 to push the beer out of the keg)?

And how is the Campaign for Real Ale going over there?

Don

Re: Clearing in a cool place



Quoted text here. Click to load it
the
was

I'm not going to artificially carbonate my beer, although my local store is
selling the caps for the pressure barrel with the valve for the CO2
cylinder.

Peter

anon_peter@yahoo.co.uk



Site Timeline