New to beer making

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  I am a seasoned wine maker so i know the basics, my question is : when
i was bottling my brew the beer was foaming up in the bottles when i was
filling them , is that normal.  will the beer clear up in the bottles,
it looked like muddy water in the carboy.

I am looking for a clone for Heiaken beer , sorry my spelling sucks.


Re: New to beer making


That is normal, I believe it's just the co2 coming out of solution.  If
your bottles are warm, foaming will be worse.

Dave


Re: New to beer making


Vince wrote:

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The muddiness will probably not clear up. Generally speaking
you will probably want to make sure you use some sort of finings
to get rid of that, geletin, irish moss or whatever.


--

"A dead religion is like a dead cat -- the stiffer and
more rotten it is, the better it is as a missile weapon."
 - H.G. Wells

Cheerful Charlie

Re: New to beer making



Vince Wrote:
> I am a seasoned wine maker so i know the basics, my question is
: when
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Some beers foam more during bottling than others, so yes, it's normal.
That
won't tell you anything about the final result, so there's nothing you
should
worry about just yet.

I'm guessing the muddy water look is caused by the yeast in the beer,
and
that's ok as well. Your beer should clear up in the bottles in a week
or two.
This
time depends on the type of yeast used, some are quicker to flocculate
than
others.


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Re: New to beer making



I would also recommend a secondary ferment, to clear it up.


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Re: New to beer making



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Vince, I just wanted to be sure that you checked to see that your beer
had finished fermenting before bottling.  You checked the gravity, etc.,
right?

Usually by bottling time *most* of the yeast will have settled and the
beer will be fairly clear.  Personally, I have only had significant foam
when bottling a few times... usually when the beer was VERY cold from
lagering - i.e. about 30F and there was a good bit of CO2 in solution.

The combination of "muddy" and "foaming" sorta raises a red flag that
there may have been active fermentation.  Perhaps not, but I just wanted
to make sure!  If you wish, tell us more about your procedure, recipe,
temperatures during fermentation, gravity measurements, etc...

Regarding clearing in bottles... yeast will settle out after priming
is done.  There may still be haze.  If that bothers you a lot, after
priming you can refrigerate them for several weeks to settle out some
of the other haze.  Since haze doesn't affect taste, mine usually
doesn't last that long! :)

Derric


Re: New to beer making



I'm going to clarify a statement I made:

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It would be more accurate to say "after carbonation" since the beer
will need a couple of weeks at room temperature (~70F) to allow the
yeast to carbonate the beer... THEN you can refrigerate it as long as
you wish!

Derric

Re: New to beer making


I used a beer kit, when  i started the gravity was at, 1.040 then it
went down to 1.010 in a week  that's when i bottled,  i just checked the
bottles and there clearing up  but i see some slight sediment on the
bottom of the bottles, looks ok , how long  can you kept beer in a
carboy  before you have to bottle it?

Derric wrote:
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Re: New to beer making


Some around here believe years for the proper lagering of prime lager wort.
and others months for ageing of their English Bitters.
-Vosen

Vince wrote:

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--
subjugate the rhyme and rock with the rhythm
only got one line to balk all the schizm

Re: New to beer making



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That sounds about right.


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Agreed, sounds OK.  (Oh... you mentioned you were a winemaker... here's
a difference since wine usually has very little sediment: when you pour
your beer into a glass, be sure to do it carefully and try to avoid
stirring up the yeast sediment.  Leave a little beer in the bottle.
You'll get a clearer and better beer that way).


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If your beer is on the "trub" (the old used hops, hot/cold break
material, and old yeast), then a month or so would be fine.

If you siphon the beer off the trub into a fresh glass carboy, you CAN
leave it there practically forever.  Most beers will improve some over
time... strong beers continue to improve longer than lighter beers.
If you drop the temp to 30-40F, then you are "lagering" or "cold
conditioning" and that will further clarify and improve your beer.
For a real rough idea, most English/American ales are good drunk early.
Stronger ales (like IPA) age well, at least a few months.  Lager beers
improve with several months lagering at low temps (the lager yeast will
continue to work some).  Very strong ales, like "barleywines" continue
to improve for years.  It's a running homebrew joke that the last beer
out of the keg is always the best one!

Derric


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