Steeping tea in milk

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Hello all,

Does anyone know if steeping your tea directly in heated milk (i.e. no
water involved in the process) will affect it's infusion? Will using
milk only decrease the amount of "goodstuffs" (for lack of a better
word... and knowledge) that's extracted from the tea leaves?

Thanks.


Re: Steeping tea in milk



amkessel@gmail.com wrote:
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Let me preface this by saying I have never tried this and am not an
expert or chemistry-type person... but, I would think it would not
steep well. It would seem to me that the type of milk would be
important. Skim would most likely produce better results of all the
types of milk. I would think the fat content would inhibit steeping to
some degree.

The best I can say would be to try it out and report back. Good luck!

- Dominic


Re: Steeping tea in milk


Dominic T.1144782824.574113.75610@i39g2000cwa.googlegroups.com4/11/06
15:13dominictiberio@gmail.com

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Buffalo, and boil the shit out of it!


Re: Steeping tea in milk


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Yes, it changes the way the tea tastes considerably, because you are now
doing an oil extraction as well.  I think the result is rather unpleasant
but some folks like it for spiced masala teas.
--scott

--
"C'est un Nagra.  C'est suisse, et tres, tres precis."

Re: Steeping tea in milk


The chemical reaction of the polyphenols in tea with proteins and fats
contained in milk has been scientifically researched. The latest
consensus I heard of (forgot the source) says that adding milk doesnt
significantly "block" the polyphenols.

You might want to try a mix of 50% water/50% milk as it is widely
practised in India and Nepal. Bring to a boil, add tea (& chai spices),
steep, "enjoy".

Karsten


Re: Steeping tea in milk


On 11 Apr 2006 15:06:24 -0700, psyflake@yahoo.com wrote:

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Did you not just forget something here? The sickly sweet taste!

Add 2 or 3 large spoonfuls of sugar, per glass of tea. Real chai
should always be served in glasses, unless of course you can have it
in a little handmade clay cup, disposable, out the railway window
along with banana peel and other leftovers.


Lars
Stockholm

Re: Steeping tea in milk



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Rather negative description of proper chai, eh?  Add processed
white sugar to anything, and you'll drive the life right out of it. For
chai, put in jagery, or however you spell it. That's a rough raw sugar that
adds flavor and sweetness to the brew.  And for the love of God, don't under
any circumstances buy any product called "chai"; instead, make it up
yourself. I have spoken.

OP is of course correct on all counts.

Michael                                            


Re: Steeping tea in milk


Lars schrieb:
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Not exactly forgotten, I still get the shivers when I just think of it,
yuk ...
My first words in Hindi some x years ago: "bi na chini" - no sugar
(please).

Karsten [12 yr old green Menghai in der Tasse]


Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai


psyflake@yahoo.com1144928165.067494.3870@i40g2000cwc.googlegroups.com4/13/06
07:36psyflake@yahoo.com

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Me thinks no sugar please is antithetical to the beast. Speaking of which,
talk to us about your 12 year old green Menghai.
Michael


Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai


Michael wrote:
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Brewed in my beloved, leaky 5$ Yixing pot its mellow and complex, a
pretty dense, "round" and savory spectrum with sweet notes of algae and
warm spices, delicate flashes of clove, very dynamic through the
steeps, sweet and silky almost creamy lingering aftertaste.
What I almost like most about this tea is the lovely color it develops
after around the 3rd steep, a vibrating salmon pink that tends toward
indian red.
My personal #1 in my humble collection, complexitywise it will serve as
a kind of touchstone during my next trip to Yunnan.

Karsten [next candidate: 2006 bio-organic FF Darjeeling Pouchong]


Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai


psyflake@yahoo.com writes:

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I think I know (and love) what you mean by algae: the taste and smell
of a freshwater pond in summer.  For years I've thought that, if by
some miracle - which might be good or bad - our vocabulary for
describing tea gets standardized, the word for this will be "pondy".

/Lew
---
Lew Perin / perin@acm.org
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai


Lewis Perinpc7odz535eq.fsf@panix1.panix.com4/13/06 10:40perin@panix.com

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Pondy it is, and I wonder if it could be what I affectionately call "musty"
on occasion. Michael


Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai



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Well, it isn't what *I* call "musty": a kind of mammalian scent, I'd
say.  When I think of the mustiness of a nice young Pu'er, I think of
my cat Buster's fur.  We aren't getting this thing standardized, are we?

/Lew
---
Lew Perin / perin@acm.org
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai


Lewis Perinpc7k69tscxs.fsf@panix1.panix.com4/13/06 11:38perin@panix.com

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No, we're not. But it's in the discussion of the words rather than the words
per se that get us there. Once we're standardized, we're boring. (Hey, some
of us perhaps accomplish that feat already.) I'll see if Jenny's fur works
as well as Buster's. I think perhaps that smell is "soupy."

Michael


Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai



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I'm sure Buster would be interested in Jenny's fur.  Shall we ask the
two of them if a tasting session would be agreeable?

/Lew
---
Lew Perin / perin@acm.org
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai


Lewis Perinpc7hd4x72ax.fsf@panix1.panix.com4/13/06 14:33perin@panix.com

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I'll ask, but I guess we both know the answer. Unless Jenny's magnanimity
and trusting nature reach beyond reason, in which case I'll answer for her.
Michael


Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai


Lew wrote:
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Lew, thanks a lot for sharing that picture.
It helped me a lot to reflect on the "spontaneous", "automatic"
generation of my own aroma/taste visuals, all those numberless
potential factors that flow into those hallucinations.
Coming back to the Menghai, the visual that spontaneously showed up on
my internal screen was that of a camp spot on a late spring meadow
close to the beach on one of the Lofoten islands. Looking back it
reflects more of the salty/savory aspects of that specific tea but now
your summer pond not only matches the overall algaeish and herbal
facets better, but also reflects some of that teas aspects
("mustiness"/decomposition of organic matter) I didnt mention.
Wonderful.
While I happily add "pondy" to my tea tasting vocabulary, I however
dont see any advantage in a standardization of tea terminology but
still believe in using free and spontaneuos asscocations. Especially
after having tasted a large number of Darjeelings together with
professional tea tasters who indulge in endless repetitions of their
pretty limited professional terminology (woody, brisky, green, ...)
without deviating a single time from that muddy beaten track. IMO not
exactly helpful in communicating the impressions of a sensual
experience as complex as tea.

Karsten


Standardizing vocabulary (was: Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai)


psyflake@yahoo.com writes:

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I'm pretty ambivalent about trying to standardize tea vocabulary,
too.  I wouldn't want to be limited to a finite list of adjectives,
certainly, but I do find it frustrating that we have so little idea
what the other is experiencing.

(Yes, I'm aware that there are philosophical issues here, and I don't
think it would help to ventilate them.)

I wonder if the professional tea taster jargon might be a place to
*start* (with black teas only, I'd imagine.)  Does anyone know if the
tea tasters reliably agree with each other about whether a given tea
is woody, etc.?  Has this been studied at Tocklai or someplace?

The tea taster jargon is just a *possible* starting place; there are
others out there, certainly in China.

Here's a possible comparison.  I happen to care about music at least
as much as I do about tea.  Music is pretty complex, too, not to
mention sensual.  I find that I can glean a lot of useful information
- that is, bearing on whether I would actually *like* the music - from
reading music critics, often even those I dislike.  I don't have the
same level of confidence reading what people write about tea, and it
bothers me.

/Lew
---
Lew Perin / perin@acm.org
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html
Re: Standardizing vocabulary (was: Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai)


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Me too, needless to say.

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We get there by expanding our analogies and discussions of them.
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Oh, it's warm out here in NYC. I'll just open that window. There.
Ventilated.
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If you are refering to the "Tippy Orange Pekoe" crowd, I'd say it's a total
crock of shit and worthy of the dustbin of tea history. If you mean Oleg's
taste without aroma system -- his Russian group's system, that is -- then we
might be on to something, at least for starters. (That was Tea Disc, I
think. Oleg of Russia suggests a system based on taste and mouth sensations
rather than aroma.

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Yup. (That's my contribution.)
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Seriously, could you give an example of the kind of comment a music critic
might make that suggests to you how well you might like the music critiqued?
I think I see your point, but I'm not sure. I get a tremendous amount of
information form tea comments, but it is admittedly based on my (perceived)
knowledge of the speaker and his relationship to tea.

Finally, given the sole choice between a rigid standardization on the one
hand and "free and spontaeous association" on the other, I'd go with the
latter every time.

Michael


Re: Standardizing vocabulary (was: Re: Steeping tea in milk segue into Menghai)



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You mean you're sure that tea tasters, say, from two different
Calcutta brokers independently slurping the same DJ would describe it
in ways that don't overlap much?  Or do you mean that, even if they
reliably agree, their vocabulary covers nothing that would be
interesting to refined palates like, uh, ours?  Or what?

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Do you have a pointer to this?

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I'd rather not.  Why get into details of music and music criticism?
There are multiple approaches there, too, as you no doubt know.

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I didn't mean to say that I talk a lot here but find nothing worth
listening to; far from it.  But the closer the conversation comes to
the actual experience of having tea in your mouth, the more opaque all
the words seem.  (This is a first approximation, of course.  Some of
us write evocatively about tastes and aromas, at least sometimes.)

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Well, of course, but who's denying you the use of both?  (Leaving
aside the question of whether standardization must be rigid.)

/Lew
4th steep of 10-year-old Hejiang/Ha Giang so-called Pu'er
---
Lew Perin / perin@acm.org
http://www.panix.com/~perin/babelcarp.html

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