How to make Coopers Stout from the homebrew kit


Hi!
I've made homebrews from kits once before. I read in "beer for dummies" that you should not add sugar to the mixes, no matter what is said on the box. The cooper's instructions mention kilos and kilos of sugar - what is the best method for making this beer yourself? According to the instructions or with less sugar?
Thanks for any responces, Marcus
Reply to
Marcus Räder

Dammit, now look what you've done! I'm going to have to add sugar to a batch to see if I can tell the difference.
I just count on the hops to balance it. I guess I'll have to do some experimenting. Oh, the pain, the pain, I'll have to make more beer.
> Honey has been mentioned as a replacement for sugar. It too is also > almost completely fermentable, but will often add flavors that will take > quite some time to mellow out. By carefully choosing the honey, this > addition can make some very nice beers. > > I hope this gives you some background on which to base your decision on > whether or not to use sugar in your beers. As a side note, almost all > Belgian beers use sugar to give them their characteristic dryness. Most > homebrewers that make barleywines will often use sugar to help lower the > final gravity.
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Reply to
Zaphod Beeblebrock

My own experience is that using sugar (of any type) in amounts up to 20-25% of total fermentables is perfectly fine. In fact, there's no way to make most Belgian styles or many British styles without using sugar. It will lighten the body of the beer, making what the Belgians refer to as a "digestible" beer. Without the sugar, high gravity Belgian beers would be too sweet and thick to be enjoyable to drink.
--------->Denny -- Life begins at 60...1.060, that is.
Reply to
Denny Conn

Ah, that was what I was thinking.
But I happen to like mine so thick that you almost have to chew them. When making any given recipe I tend to increase the amounts of malt, sometimes substantially.
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Reply to
Zaphod Beeblebrock

Weel, if that's what you want, more power to ya! I don't use sugar in high gravity brewes like BW, which are supposed to be thick and sweet. But that's the last thing I want in a tripel...they REALLY need the sugar.
----------->Denny -- Life begins at 60...1.060, that is.
Reply to
Denny Conn

Some more thoughts about this matter. Cooper's recommends using a minimum of 250 grams of sugar with their beer kits, to help with the fermentation. When made into a 23 liter batch this should give approximately between 3,2% - 3,5% alcohol by volume.
I decided I'm going to make a stout with one can of Cooper's stout extract and the recommended minimum of 250 grams of sugar. In addition I'm going to reduce the amount of water so that the beer should end up with the strenght I want. I'll probably make a 15 liter batch which should have approximately 4,9% - 5,4% alcohol by volume.
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hevimees

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Reply to
hevimees

"hevimees" skrev i meddelandet news: snipped-for-privacy@usenet.brewtank.com...
Thank you, that helped a lot! Hevimees is from Estonia or Finland? I think I'll try sth of the same.
M
Reply to
Marcus Räder

I'm from Finland, Oulu to be exact.
I actually bought the extract today and will probably make it tomorrow. I'll try to remember to post the results as soon as the beer is ready.
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hevimees

* Hevimees - bad spelling since 2004 *
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Reply to
hevimees

My stout has now been in bottle for about a month, and the result is not very good :(
Overhopped, but not much taste otherwise. I'll leave it for another month and see if it has smoothed out at all.
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hevimees

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Reply to
hevimees

I have found that malt adds body and sugar adds alcohol. In my stouts I use enough malts to give me the thick body that I love but then will always add sugar to give it just a bit more kick. After all it is the buzz factor that makes a good stout all the more interesting. Please note that more sugar less malt can create a thin almost nothing brew but can give you one big buzz, but then who wants to just go for the buzz without the wonderful flavor and enjoyment of a quality brew. If you are going for that you just as well make a still. Denny said 20-25% is OK and for the most part I have to agree with that. I say the most part because it depends on how much malt you plan to put in. If you going for one of those watered down 4-5% ABV brews then you may find 25% sugar doesn't leave you much body in the brew and you just as well to have picked up some cheap low cal light beers from the store and saved yourself the time and troubles.
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dlihcsnatas

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Reply to
dlihcsnatas

After four moths in the bottle the taste is just great :) Very smooth and tasty. Patience paid off this time, though according to all good home brewing traditions, most of my stout has been drunk by the time it starts to taste really good...
I'll definitely make this stuff again. In case someone's interested, I used one can of Cooper's Stout extract and 250 grams of white sugar, made into a 15 liter batch. I'll probably make the next one a bit stronger with less water.
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hevimees

* Hevimees - bad spelling since 2004 *
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Reply to
hevimees

White sugar? Seems like additional extract, instead of the sugar, might eliminate what you initially taste and don't care for.
>I'll definitely make this stuff again. In case someone's interested, I >used one can of Cooper's Stout extract and 250 grams of white sugar, >made into a 15 liter batch. I'll probably make the next one a bit >stronger with less water.
Reply to
Richard L Walker

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